Cooking over pine

Discussion in 'General Bushcraft Discussion' started by D.K, Feb 19, 2012.

  1. D.K

    D.K Tracker

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    I made tea over oak coals and some pine twigs and pinecones. That was a mistake :11: I had to scrape of the pine tar this morning haha.

    Lesson learned!
     
  2. RangerJoe

    RangerJoe Bushwhacker Bushclass II

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    yup, been there, sometimes all you have is Pine.
     
  3. Yellow Lab

    Yellow Lab Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    Skip the pine cones. They tend to have more resin in them. Cooking with pine has it shortcomings. For me I think it coats the pot well. I put my pot in a small bag and it protects everything else from the pine tar.
     
  4. Seeker

    Seeker Woods Bum Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    that's one thing i hate about my area... not a lot of hardwood deadfall... so i end up cooking over pine and magnolia. and one wood around here, i can't figure out which, has the eye-stingingest smoke i've ever run into... but every once in awhile i accidentally throw a stick in and pay for it.

    as stated, use a plastic grocery bag for the pot. one good thing is it heats up quick once it's black, and i like how it smells too (wife doesn't though.)
     
  5. mainewoods

    mainewoods Maine Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    Pine great for a overnight fire with hard wood add, But cooking like others have said too Much resin . But Like Joe Said " sometimes all you have is Pine "
    Thanks for the Post.
     
  6. L.V

    L.V Guide Bushclass I

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    If it burns without killing you it's good firewood ;)
     
  7. Ron

    Ron Guide

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    I go for birch whenever possible....
    But in the woods around here, unfortunately often pine is the only option...
     
  8. Friartuck

    Friartuck Guide

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    Birch is my all around favorite wood. The smoke is like french perfume to me. I have heard that pine is a carcinogen, or at least some component of it is, but can't provide and scientific proof. I still cook over it though and agree, it can be smokey and sooty but fire is fire!
     
  9. WoodsJack

    WoodsJack Guide

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    I seem to recall someone saying that they paint their cookware and water bottles with a black, heat paint (like for BBQ stuff) before they use 'em in camp. I think this was somehow to also prevent that kind of pitch build up.

    Anyone know about this, or do it?
     
  10. .338WinMag

    .338WinMag Scout

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    I would have to say that not all pine's are necessarily bad to cook with a old pard of mine who has recently passed on, cooked a forrest grouse on the north fork of the salmon river once and it was mighty fine tasting as i recall ,the wood of the evening's fire was ponderosa pine which the old mature stuff is quite hard for a pine imo also we cooked many elk and deer steaks ,steelhead ,and regular chickens on it when ever we were up that way and it was always great imo. .338winmag:)
     
  11. Gryphonblade

    Gryphonblade Guide

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    Man, I'd love to have some pine to burn! Cottonwood has no heat in it, just smoke.
     
  12. Trail Dust

    Trail Dust Scout

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    We are surrounded by thousands upon thousands of acres of lodgepole and ponderosa pine, with just a smidgen of aspen and blue spruce mixed in with that. So, if one is going to burn wood around here, it will be pine. Pine can certainly be messy to deal with but, you get used to it and learn to appreciate it for what it is...the 'only' option. Over the mountain from here a few miles, more spruce varieties start showing up along with white and douglas fir, tamarack, cedar, and yew. These, too, have their problems when it comes to a good cooking fire wood when compared to some of the better hardwoods (how I miss hickory, ash, birch, and oak).

    I sprayed a couple of my Guyot stainless bottles with black "Rust-Oleum High Heat Enamel", used for protecting wood stoves, grills, etc. It does help with cleaning up some of the gunk that accumulates when using pine. Darkened, smoky cookware I don't mind as it becomes 'efficient' cookware. However when it becomes sticky with tar buildup, I go to removing that.
     

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