Distinction: Slip Knot vs. Noose Knot

Discussion in 'Other Skills' started by NJHeart2Heart, Feb 17, 2017.

  1. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Backyard Bushcrafter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2016
    Messages:
    1,867
    Likes Received:
    6,975
    Location:
    Morris County suburbs, NJ, USA
    I am planning on completing the Intermediate Knots practice and noticed an important detail in the official Bushclass video by Skab

    I was confused as to specifically which end of the rope was to be formed into a bight and passed through the loop, so I searched for other resources on "slip knot".

    According to Animated Knots:

    Slip Knot

    Noose Knot

    Using the above source, and looking at other comparable videos, I personally would call the knot he demonstrated as the "Noose Knot" (not the hangman's noose, which is a more complex knot).

    They are completely different knots which tighten from opposite ends of the rope. One knot forms the bight out of the long or "standing" end and the other forms the bight out of the short or "working" end.

    According to the website, the word "slipped" is added to a primary knot name when it's modified to be releasable using a tucked in bight. I personally call this a quick release.

    In the context of Skab's video, the knot he used to form the button was clearly functional and is exactly what I create when using the button technique on tarps, but I'm not so sure about the name he used for it.

    After studying the differences, I was reminded how important it is understand the terminology you use. It reminded me how my use of the wrong knot and/or incorrectly naming a knot could mean at the very least, losing an item of equipment, but at worse, someone's life could be endangered.
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2017
    rsnurkle, OrienM, Zebra Alpha and 6 others like this.
  2. Sandcut

    Sandcut Bushmaster Vendor

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2010
    Messages:
    5,097
    Likes Received:
    2,636
    Location:
    Gouldsboro, PA
    This is why plants and animals have Latin names, to avoid issues with common names.

    I would say that the knot known as "noose knot" in your link is the one more commonly referred to, in my experience, as a "slip knot". I have never seen a slip knot refer to a stopper knot before.

    ETA: I'll be teaching slip knots in my class tomorrow and it will be similar to the one identified as a noose knot in your link.
     
    rsnurkle, OrienM and Jasonacraft like this.
  3. ra2bach

    ra2bach Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2014
    Messages:
    3,384
    Likes Received:
    1,589
    Location:
    ATL
    good catch. if you want to get confused, check out the way the Taut Line Hitch is tied...

    :54:

    I see the slip knot demonstrated on the animated site used as a stopper knot. if you use it around something some might still call it a slip knot or a turn with a slippery half hitch. people who hammock would call that a Becket Hitch, which can also be called a slippery sheet bend.

    the problem with knots is there a lot of them that are called by multiple names. and some of the names are regional and simply derive from common usage. the Noose Knot is shown by another name, the Running Bowline. a Lark's Head is actually a hitch, properly a Girth Hitch, sometimes called a Cow Hitch.

    but no matter, there are functional differences and I think as long as you're aware of that and use the correct knot in the right application, you can call it a Granny Knot around the running part and it will be correct...

    most important is that you are taking the time to learn about this stuff. good on you!..
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2017
    rsnurkle, NJHeart2Heart and Sandcut like this.
  4. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Backyard Bushcrafter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2016
    Messages:
    1,867
    Likes Received:
    6,975
    Location:
    Morris County suburbs, NJ, USA
    Hmm. interesting take. I may edit my OP as to the stopper part, as I was not sure how that sounded.. Thanks for weighing in, and good luck with your class! :)
     
    Sandcut likes this.
  5. Smokey Radley

    Smokey Radley Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2011
    Messages:
    1,150
    Likes Received:
    762
    Location:
    Oklahoma, USA
    +1 on knots having multiple names. This can be cultural, industry, regional based, etc. Knots can also have different names based on which variation of a knot you are using.
     
    rsnurkle likes this.
  6. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Backyard Bushcrafter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2016
    Messages:
    1,867
    Likes Received:
    6,975
    Location:
    Morris County suburbs, NJ, USA
    I like the aforementioned linked website in particular because it has detailed descriptions and comparisons to other knots underneath the videos, and is based on what seems to be considered the classic manual of knots (The Ashley Book of Knots).
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2017
    rsnurkle likes this.
  7. Zornt

    Zornt Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2010
    Messages:
    1,313
    Likes Received:
    219
    Location:
    Southeastern Ohio (Bellaire)
    Knots are addictive!!!
    If you want to have more fun and confusion, plus a whole lot of good information.
    Grab a copy of The Ashley Book of Knots, by Clifford Ashley.
    He lists around 7000 (not a typo) different knots.
    This is not a cheap book it lists for around $70 on Amazon.
     
    werewolf won and NJHeart2Heart like this.
  8. DarrylM

    DarrylM Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2016
    Messages:
    1,069
    Likes Received:
    2,507
    Location:
    NE Washington State
    The multiple names for a given knot as well as the multiple knots with the same name is why Ashley's Book if Knots (ABoK, ABOK, abok) has each knot listed by a unique number instead of names. Which has similar effect to the latin naming of species.
     
    NJHeart2Heart likes this.
  9. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Backyard Bushcrafter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2016
    Messages:
    1,867
    Likes Received:
    6,975
    Location:
    Morris County suburbs, NJ, USA
    I'm a BIG fan of databases and organizing by unique index number is a critical part of a good database. It's so true- avoids much confusion over names.
     
  10. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Backyard Bushcrafter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2016
    Messages:
    1,867
    Likes Received:
    6,975
    Location:
    Morris County suburbs, NJ, USA
    I do have several knot books, but have never been brave enough to buy THE book ABOK :) As much as I love knots, I get overwhelmed with too much at once. I have to pick a few, learn a few really well, then move on.. I think unfortunately the ABOK would be a shelf warmer ;)
     
  11. DarrylM

    DarrylM Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2016
    Messages:
    1,069
    Likes Received:
    2,507
    Location:
    NE Washington State
    It is mostly a reference tome often used to bludgeon people who make the mistake of being seen to be slightly wrong on the internet.
     
    Backyard and NJHeart2Heart like this.
  12. werewolf won

    werewolf won TANSTAAFL Supporter Bushcraft Friend

    Blog Posts:
    5
    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2010
    Messages:
    11,377
    Likes Received:
    5,442
    Location:
    East Freetown, MA
    I went to a tree climbing demonstration last year, wow I thought I knew a lot of knots from caving and rock climbing and the marine industry –was I mistaken!

    Not to be macabre but the knot the Europeans used to hang people with is quite a different affair from the American’s hangman’s knot. Their knot is a whipped eye with the bitter end threaded through it. They used a thinner rope and that combination caused close to instant loss of consciousness by occluding blood flow to the brain. The so called hangman’s fracture (which does exist) the American knot was supposed to cause was rarely if ever caused by the knot.
     
    rsnurkle likes this.
  13. OrienM

    OrienM Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2013
    Messages:
    829
    Likes Received:
    1,368
    Location:
    Gila, NM
    Huh, weird terminology there IMHO. To me, the first knot is a single overhand knot with drawloop, the second is a "normal" slipknot.

    (A related knot I'm unsure of is what I call a 'reversed' slipknot, where the short end tightens the loop...it needs a stopper knot, usually a single overhand, added on the short end to keep from pulling out. Does this have its own unique name?)
     
  14. Backyard

    Backyard Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    May 8, 2016
    Messages:
    828
    Likes Received:
    2,763
    Location:
    SE PA
    A rose by any other name.....

    I know and have practiced a number of knots and hitches, they all have names. I refer to them for their use. There is the one I use on my ridge line, a few I use for guy lines, ones I use to attach this to that. Most of the reason behind not caring about the name is that so many people use different terms, and my main focus is on functionality.
     
  15. southron

    southron Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2015
    Messages:
    722
    Likes Received:
    1,242
    Location:
    N.E Alabama
    Always some issues with names, esp regional naming of a given know. Also folk who do some sort of specialty I.E. sailors often have their own specific name for a given knot.

    What is most important to me is to have a selection of knots to accomplish the things you need to accomplish.

    My first two places I learned named knots would have been boy scouts and military sources.

    I used different ones I learned from individuals and the name they used often conflicted with the name I later was taught by those formal sources and others. Bottom line is the knot was consistent and did what I expected it to do so in the end it worked.

    Still communication means we gotta all understand what others are saying so that is something worth working on being able to put your knowledge into language that who your talking to can understand.

    For example I know a british fellow who talks about boot sales. To me that means a place to buy foot wear at a good price, to him it means selling stuff out of the car trunk (boot).

    Anyway, thanks for getting my brain juices to thinking.

    Jim
     
  16. ra2bach

    ra2bach Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2014
    Messages:
    3,384
    Likes Received:
    1,589
    Location:
    ATL
    have you looked at the the Taut Line Hitch yet? almost universally tied incorrectly. it is a small but critical difference.

    I was taught the proper way, which is also called Midshipman's Hitch, but in general use most people tie it like this -- http://www.netknots.com/rope_knots/tautline-hitch
     
    rsnurkle likes this.

Share This Page