Does anyone make Emergency Kits???

Discussion in 'Preparedness' started by MATT CHAOS, Aug 8, 2011.

  1. MATT CHAOS

    MATT CHAOS Guide Bushclass I

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    Does anyone here make emergency kits? I know everyone makes First Aid Kits(FAK) and Personal Survival Kits (PSK's) but what about an emergency kit? I am a Scoutmaster in a Boy Scout Troop and one of the things all the boys in the troop make are Emergency kits. I do have to say that it is very similar to PSK in many ways but in many ways it is different. It is something they can grab and give them the needed essentials to survive for a few days if the need arises. The boys make their kits in case of floods, power outages etc. Imagine Hurricane Katrina type disaster. The kit tends to be larger and contains essentials they need to survive for a few days (including the needs of their families) until they are rescued etc. The kit is kept in something that they or someone in their family can quickly grab as they exit their house, usually a medium sized duffel bag. It usually contains food (usually canned or dried preserved), water, matches, plastic bags (from garbage bag sized to small), water purification tabs, toliet paper, pencil and paper, meds for at least a few days, a small first aid kit, spare seeing glasses etc. Each boy's kit is slightly different because each person has their own unique needs for a few days, for example meds etc. What is everyone's thoughts on this?
     
  2. aste

    aste Scout

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    You might want to check the preparedness subforum. :)
     
  3. Pinebaron

    Pinebaron Guide

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    Here's an on going thread about that type of kit:

    Urban Kit
     
  4. Sgt. Mac

    Sgt. Mac Elder Staff Member Administrator Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II Bushclass Instructor

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    Allot of guys refer that to a BOB or a Bug Out Bag Matt
     
  5. sidecarr

    sidecarr Scout Bushclass I

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    I'll get you bob list when I see you later
     
  6. Tyronethepro

    Tyronethepro Tracker

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    I make a BOB, here's a list of what's in mine now.

    1 CS Rifleman Hawk
    1 1950's Northern King Axe
    1 Machete (Modified so I can use the end as a shovel)
    1 Ontario MKIII USN Knife
    30FT Paracord
    2 Lighters
    1 Magnesium Bar
    25 Matches
    1 Ferro Rod
    1 4' X 2' Square of Foil
    18" Snare
    24" 16 Gage Wire
    1 Poncho
    1 Space Blanket
    1 Smith's Knife Sharpening Kit
    2 Water Bottles
    1 Map of the Cascade Mountains by Tampico
    1 Compass
    1 Whistle
    1 Tinderbox (2 Pitch Balls, 4 cotton balls, 1 oz dryer lint)
    2 Mini Mag Lite Flashlights
    1 12LED Flashlight
    2 Bandannas
    Extra Socks

    That's about it
     
  7. mountainshadow

    mountainshadow Scout

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    It sounds like your troop has their act together Matt. My wife and I put together a BOB that contains freeze dried food and MREs for 3 days, machete, rope, tarp, fire steel, e-tool, compass, map of the area, brass snare wire, gill net, fish snare. SKS and 500 rnds ammo, first aid kit, mess gear, rain gear, extra medications, water purification tablets and filter, books. Soap, hand sanitizer, antiseptic, playing cards, paracord. There's probably more in there but I don't recall what it is.
     
  8. benajah

    benajah Scout

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    I work for one of the supermajor oil companies and they actually issue survival kits to all employees and contractors.
    Depending on where you are they contain different stuff, but here in the SF Bay area they are most concerned about earthquakes, so the kits contain a gallon of water, a space blanket, little first aid kit, power bars, whistle, etc.
    For the guys out looking for oil in the boonies, they have GPS, rifles, tents, cooking gear, food, water filters, all sorts of stuff, but those guys go out to the ends of the earth.
    We even have to fill out emergency action plans every year and do drills, where if we get hurt or stranded how do we contact the company, and how do we contact our next of kin,
     
  9. pure_mahem

    pure_mahem Guide

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    Might I sugest starting with a 5 gallon bucket with a potty lid, some trash bags, TP, Bleach, and some of the RV stuff you put in the potty in the camper. These are items often overlooked and seem to be first of need every time the power goes out. I find a head lamp and some oil lamps very handy. We store every thing in a spare closet. For everything else I got my Bug out Bag that sets me up pretty well. the only other thing I might add would be to store some water, not all situations are like this but usually all of my situations revolve around some rainstorm or blizzard knocking the power out so when we know that type of weather is coming we fill all the big pots with water in addition to the jugs of water we have. Good for washing up and cooking if the power is out for days on end. We also have a Kerosene heater we store filled and a siphon as our main heat uses Kerosene so we don't have to store extra we just have to be able to axcess it. It's a good idea. Don't forget the P38 either seems to get a lot of use at my house. Good luck with the rest, I don't think you'll be short on info in your search. It's a good idea let us know how your kit turns out or post us on your progress I'm sure we all will add further suggestions. We're good at that, lol!
     
  10. Boy Scout

    Boy Scout Scout

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    Matt, I'm an Emergency Management/CERT officer in Indianapolis. The first thing I do when I teach a citizen preparedness class is to introduce the DHS/FEMA system to the public and the resources available for training through the website. I encourage folks to start building preparations (preps) by using the IS-22 course as a guidline, then build your preps and kit from there, based on your specific area and needs.

    Here is a link to IS-22: http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/is/is22.asp

    Also, I wholeheartedly recommend getting your boys (and family or anybody else you know, for that matter) involved in CERT (Community Emergency Response Team) training. CERT is usually offered by your local emergency management agency, sometimes free of charge. The bonus is, every attendee gets a free CERT kit at the end of the course. Here's a link for more information: https://www.citizencorps.gov/cert/
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2011
  11. MATT CHAOS

    MATT CHAOS Guide Bushclass I

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    I had to take a whole bunch of FEMA courses when I volunteered at the 2010 Boy Scout Jamboree. I agree those courses are great and the ones I took were free. I had forgotten about them. Thanks for the reminder!!!
     
  12. sherlockian100

    sherlockian100 Scout Bushclass I

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  13. StoneHopper

    StoneHopper Scout

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    Sounds like what we used to call 72 hour kits. Lots of info here and in the Preparedness section of Downloads on them.
     
  14. Surefire91

    Surefire91 Tracker

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    Yeah I make my own earthquake kits! For me and family!
     
  15. Bard

    Bard Scout

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    72 hour kit is what we call them. It has all we need to get by for three days. We have one for each member of the family.
     
  16. EdD270

    EdD270 Guide Bushclass I

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    Good on you for working with the Scouts. That training and experience is more important to those boys than we can imagine in today's world.

    Sounds like the kit for the Emergency Preparedness merit badge. Most folks call them 72 hour kits, or grab bags or BOBs. Lots of good advice and references already given here. There should be a listing of suggestions in the Emergency Preparedness merit badge booklet, too. As you say, there will be some differences according to the boy's needs and circumstances, but they are essentially the same. should contain rain gear, such as a poncho, light source such as headlight, candles, or flashlight, fire starting stuff, some sort of shelter such as a tarp or poncho, compass, some water, food, medicines, socks and underwear, personal hygiene items like toothbrush and paste and comb, a small battery or crank radio, ID, list of emergency contact phone numbers, some money, both bills and change, and other things the boys may want to include to get them through at least 3 days, 72 hours, until help comes.
    Everything, except possibly the water, should fit into a daypack, bookbag, or 5- or 6- gal plastic pail. The pail can be part of the kit as it can be used for carrying water, etc. Water is problematic since it's so bulky and heavy. Three days of water is at least three gallons, five would be better. If you live where surface water is abundant you could substitute water purification, not just filtering, gear for water itself. Out here in Arizona that's not always a good option, though.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2012

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