Elders Challenge #1

Discussion in 'Tree and Plant ID Database' started by GreyOne, Jun 30, 2010.

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  1. Sgt. Mac

    Sgt. Mac Elder Staff Member Administrator Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II Bushclass Instructor

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    Great job Rusty!! Well done
  2. Ironwood

    Ironwood Guide

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    Hey there,
    Going to try this, hope the images work.

    First tree
    Red Oak: Quercus rubra
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    Leaves are pinnately shaped and alternately arranged. The dead leaves are retained throughout most of the fall and winter.

    Red oak is the provincial tree of Prince Edward Island, Canada and is featured on our provincial flag four times, representing the monarchy (symbolically not figuratively) and the three counties, Prince, Queens, and Kings of Prince Edward Island.
    Red Oak is great for many things first and foremost feeding all those squirrels and chipmunks and other critters that love their acorns.
    Commercially most kitchen cabinetry and oak flooring is made from red oak. The wood is legendary for furniture and other uses where toughness and durability are key.

    Second tree
    White pine: Pinus strobus

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    White pine is identified by 5 needles per vascular bundle, which incidentally can be remember as each letter in the word w h i t e. The leaves are soft to the touch and have a blueish tinge or frosting to them.
    White pine was crucial to the early ship building days and most stands were clear cut and wisked away back to Europe. Today white pine is commercially important for furniture and other building purposes. The pitch is useful to make glue, firstaid treatment or fire accelerant.

    Third Tree
    Butternut:Jugulans cenerea

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    Characterized by large compound leaves greater than 8 inches in length with 11 to 17 leaflets. Much larger and longer than black walnut.
    The Butternut tree is a member of the walnut family and is sometimes referred to as white walnut. It has value as lumber for furniture making. The fruit is useful to many species of wildlife.

    Fourth tree
    Hard maple, Sugar maple, Rock maple:Acer saccharum

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    Leaves are oppositely arranged on the twig are broad, flat simple, palmately lobed, notches U-shaped, small notches.

    The wood is hard, close-grained, and heavy, making this a very valuable timber tree. It has many uses, including for flooring, furniture, bow making, veneer, musical instruments, and a variety of wooden ware. In terms of quantity produced, this tree is the best source of maple sugar, and has been used as such since the days of early settlement.

    Fifth tree
    Saskatoon berry, Service berry:Amelanchier alnifolia

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    Leaves: 2 - 5 cm long; broadly elliptical to nearly round; rounded at both ends; coarsely toothed above middle; usually with 7 to 9 straight veins on each side. Dark green and becoming hairless above, paler and hairy when young underneath. Bark: gray or brown; thin, smooth or slightly grooved. Twigs: reddish-brown; narrow, hairless. Flowers: 2 - 3 cm wide; with five narrow white petals; in small, terminal clusters; in spring with leaves. Fruit: 12 mm in diameter; small, apple-like, purple or blackish, edible, juicy and sweet with several seeds.
    I love these kinda like a cross between a plum and a blueberry, yummy.

    So there you have it a few trees that I like and enjoy around my neck of the woods. Hoope you had fun and learned a little.

    phil

    p.s. thanks elders for the fun opportunity
  3. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    Ironwood, looks like it worked fine !
  4. Grits

    Grits Guide

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    Thanks Rusty. I learned about the Blackjack Oak and Hackberry from you!
  5. Grits

    Grits Guide

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    Thanks Ironwood. I learned about the Butternut from you.
    Do you know if the butternut wood has the same properties as black walnut that would make it a good bow wood?
  6. Ironwood

    Ironwood Guide

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    Hey grits

    From everything I have read about bow woods, butternut is considered a non bow wood. Having said that this does not mean a bow could not be made from it. It just means that the limbs need to be a little longer and wider, and draw weight lower than the average bow made with more traditional bow woods.

    I am working on a white ash bow right now, taking my time with it. As a white wood hardwood it is just considered average to good for bow making. Elm, ironwood (hophornbeam), and black locust are considered good white wood bow woods. I would even go with sugar or hard maple before the walnut family of woods. I saw a guy make a great shooting bow out of white birch. It was a huge looking bow with really wide limbs and long but he said it shot marvelously so experiment away but be humble if the wood fails.:)

    cheers
    phil
  7. MattM_Gilbert

    MattM_Gilbert Tracker

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    Here is something a little different, from the desert Southwest.

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    I have elected to place all of the cuttings in a single photo, to make this easier on folks who review BushcraftUSA from a smart phone.

    Across the bottom is a "leaf" from Perry's Agave or Agave parryi.

    The left most leaf structure is from a tumbleweed Salsola Kali.

    Moving clockwise from there are the following:

    Brittle Brush Encelia Farinosa

    Arizona Redwood Vaquelinia Californica

    Fremont Cottonwood Populus Fremonti

    Pointleaf Manzanita Arctostaphylos Pungens

    Screwbean Mesquite Tornillo Prosopis Pubescens

    For this photo, a leaf structure was included, as a single leaf just would not hold a candle to the broad leaves seen through out the thread.

    This combination of tress can be found in the watershed areas of the Salt River and Gila River.
  8. Trekon86

    Trekon86 Guest

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    Great going guys! Good selection of various trees of various lands!:)
    PMZ
  9. Trekon86

    Trekon86 Guest

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    Hmm...I shoulda done a piece on my current favorite carving wood, which is...get this...

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    Windfalls from our giant Norway Maples!
    Tell ya what guys...some of the prettiest things I have carved, have been carved from the Norway maples in our yard. Esp. the slingshots--every time there is a fork in this wood it produces "ripples" or tiger-maple burliness in the wood outside and sometimes inside the fork. Sanded to 320 grit and given a coat of oil, this stuff is gorgeous!

    I just made another catty from it...it's a bigger (thicker) one than last time...but just as purty.

    I elected to dye it using chestnut brown pigment dye and I am in the process of giving it several coats of tung oil.

    Sorry, just had to share:eek:

    PMZ
  10. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    Pics or it didn't happen ! ;) :)
  11. FrauHilda

    FrauHilda Guide

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    I'll start this off with begging for mercy from the Elder panel, as this is quite the challenge for me on a couple of levels. (here come the excuses...)

    I am a transplant to this area and my ID is terrible. The terrain is pretty-much opposite of my old home turf. What lives out here (flora, fauna, humans..) isn't really thriving in this environment, it's just sort-of barely surviving. :D

    And then there's the terrain itself, and my assumption that what the Elders sought was not just five trees, but 5 different species of tree. :eek: This definitely compounded the difficulty of my completing this challenge.
    I had to resort to an abandoned, landscaped property to complete the mission within 30 days.
    I submit the following as evidence to support my claim of hardship:

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    I will leave the identification of my finds to those more qualified, as I only know 3 of these for sure, and of those, I know only the genus and would guess at specie and variety or cultivar.

    On to the trees then..
    #1

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    #2


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    #3


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    #4


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    #5


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    I DO know that one of these is our state tree, and also offer the following recipe to show my appreciation to those who would positively identify my finds.


    Crabapple Jelly

    5 C. Crabapples, stems and seeds removed, chopped
    2 C. Water
    sugar to measure

    Simmer chopped crabapples and water until soft

    Strain juice through a jelly bag or 3 layers of cheesecloth. For clear jelly, do not squeeze. (clear or cloudy tastes just the same)

    For each cup of juice add 3/4 C. sugar.

    Return to saucepan and quickly bring to 220f.

    Remove from heat and pour into hot, sterilized jars.

    Makes 2 pints.

    If you’ve ever had the pleasure of tasting Pomegranate jelly, you’ll find crabapple is quite similar.
  12. Grits

    Grits Guide

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    Thanks Phil. Yes, I'm on board with that whole "experiment thing" with bowyering. Working on a red oak board bow and a hickory sapling bow now, and both are going s.l.o.w.l.y.
  13. Grits

    Grits Guide

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    Thanks, FaruHilda! My Grandma used to make crabapple jelly every year. Yum! I miss it (and her.)
  14. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    Frau Hilda, the Elders hereby recognize your ingenuity in difficult circumstances, as well as the incredible perseverance it took to find 5 trees in your local area, much less different trees !!

    Perhaps Buroak will give us some positive ID on these miracles of the high plains ! ;)

    :) :)
  15. Sgt. Mac

    Sgt. Mac Elder Staff Member Administrator Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II Bushclass Instructor

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    Well done Frau, you had a true challange on a couple of diferent fronts. Ya done good
  16. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    Hear Ye ! Hear Ye ! Let all know the time for this challenge draws swiftly to its end ! Let those brave souls who have tried the task and faltered make a last effort and show us your skill ! :)

    The Elders await your posting !
  17. lonetracker

    lonetracker Guide

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    Location:
    iron mountain mi. upper peninsula
    couple more
    eastern leatherwood dirca palustris
    also known as moosewood,rope-bark,indian rope,and wicapy
    range is all of eastern north america, to include all states boredering the mississippi river.
    leatherwood is a shrub it reaches 10 ft at the most.
    it grows in thick mature hardwoods the most were there is little light.it is often the only bush growing in these understoreys.
    it gets yellow flowers in the spring
    the branches of the leatherwood are quite pliable.they are impossible to brake,because they just bend.the wood is very light in weight and color.the bark is very usefull. for making cordage the inner bark is excellent and very strong.i have gotton two embers using this bark for the cordage of my bowdrill.the bark can also be used to tie things as soon as it is peeled from the bush.it peels very easily.i have gotten an ember using this wood for board and spindle of my firedrill.it is rare to find a dry dead bush however.
    these next two pics are about as big as they get

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    leatherwood[​IMG][/IMG]

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    peeling bark.these bushes can easily be cut through with a sharp knife and just hand pressure

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    balm of gillead or balsam poplar Populus candicans
    rangemost of north america except the south east us
    grows to 90 feet.
    it grows mostly in the area between a lowland and a dryer area.
    i used the buds of this tree to make balm of gillead salve.the buds are an expectorant and stimulant.tea made from them is used for coughs and as a gargle for sore throat, and is used externally for inflammations, cuts, wounds, and burns.The buds contain salicin which helps to explain their aspirin-like pain relieving property.

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    these trees allways look sickly to me.
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    i was going to do jueberry/serviceberry but someone beat me to it but here is more pics of it.lots of berrys thus year

    the berries are very tasty.you can eat them as soon as they turn red.the purple ones are best,they are at the peak of ripeness.they stain your mouth and hands purple.i made jelly out of them one time.it was the most vivid purple color,and tasted good.

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  18. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    This is the last call for those who wish to post to the Elders Challenge.
    As this is the end of the July moon, we will close the thread tomorrow morning, and I will move it to the Tree ID sub forum.

    To all who shared their efforts here, the Elders give you thanks, and award each of you an honorary virtual Eagle feather ! :)

    I am very grateful for all the fine pictures and detailed information , my personal thanks to all who participated, and to Sgt. Mac and Trekon for their effort in making this challenge a reality.

    A question for all members- do you wish to see further challenges from the Elders ? They won't be a regular monthly feature, but if you think the idea a good one, we will meditate deeply in the Sacred Cave, and bring a new challenge to you in the future. Speak, and let your will be known. ;)
  19. nickosnow

    nickosnow Guide

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    I'd like to see more challenges! Any excuse or better yet any motivation to strap on my boots and get outside is always a plus. I learned a lot from this challenge. And not just from other's pictures but from hands on learning!
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