Emergency Blanket With Tent

Discussion in 'Shelter' started by Matrix, Oct 29, 2012.

  1. Matrix

    Matrix Scout Bushclass I

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    I still aint all up for sleeping without a tent unless I know there is no crawlies or bigger animals that could harm me around. Insects, spiders and stuff aint the problem now but still thinking of coyotes, bears, wild bores or some other animal sniffing me while I'm sleeping don't appeal to me.
    I know, how is a tent gonna keep something out if it won't to get in.

    Anyway, going on at least 10 or 30ish mile hike (depends how I feel after crossing Blood Mnt.) on the AT in N.GA next month and may carry my Eureka Solitaire tent and to help cope with the cold I thought about putting my SOL Survival Blanket between netting and rain fly to help keep in the warmth. I was gonna try to position it where I could still get ventilation to reduce condensation.

    Would this idea work?
     
  2. MarcoMontana

    MarcoMontana Scout

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    Try a Hammock Tent that's Bushcrafty.... lol

    [​IMG]
     
  3. mjh

    mjh Supporter Supporter

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    I'd think that you would be better off with the survival blanket closer down on top of you, perhaps under your pad and then wraped over you and your bag if there is enough blanket there to do it with. If the ground is cold what can you do to improve your thermal layer underneath you? You've got the tent to trap air and some warmth, and of course your sleeping bag. I rely on my bag for warmth and the tent or tarp to keep the weather elements off me and my gear....Have fun on your trip...
     
  4. steene

    steene Scout

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    My solitaire is a pretty "warm" tent. There isn't a whole lot of space left over after I crawl in there. I think it would be worth a shot. Being someone who moves around alot when sleeping, the idea appeals to me.
    That being said, I have only used my solitaire to ~30*f. What could it hurt to give it a try?
     
  5. dducey

    dducey Scout

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    Tents need to be ventilated to keep the moisture moving out of the tent. If you are blocking the vents then the moisture from your breath will condense on the inside of the tent which could cause problems if it is heavy enough. Stay warm by dressing properly and using an appropriate sleep system. Insulation from the ground is critical in cold weather so an insulated sleeping pad is needed or several layers of insulating material can be used (fleece blankets, etc).
     
  6. Spork

    Spork Supporter Supporter

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    After looking at a photo of the Solitaire I can see where you're coming from...it's a 3-season with lots of mesh in the body. I use a first gen Sierra Designs Clip Flashlight with nothing but mesh on both ends. I've been snowed on in that tent a couple times and had icy wind shoot right under the fly and pass through. I'm with mjh above...I'd keep the emergency blanket close and forget about trying to keep the whole tent warm.
     
  7. rdec

    rdec Guide

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    With a reflective blanket you would be better pinning it up on one side inside. This can provide a small amount of actual insulation by trapping air between the tent wall and the blanket as well as reflecting heat (from you and perhaps a candle lantern) and light. It's surprising how much heat a candle lantern will provide in a small tent.
     
  8. PineMartyn

    PineMartyn Scout

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    Well, dducey made every point I was thinking of making, Matrix. I can only echo it and amplify it by adding: Never block your tent's ability to vent moisture (nor your sleeping bag) in cold weather. Nothing will make you feel clammier, colder, and reduce the insulating efficacy of your bag and shelter, than trapped moisture.

    Hope this helps,
    -Martin
     
  9. GrandLarsony

    GrandLarsony Guide

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    Consider a chemical hot-pack like hand or foot warmers but for your lower back. They sell them at any drugstore, same type of material but much larger and with a Velcro belly-belt. Actually heats your blood as it passes through your kidneys. They work. Get one per night, about 6 oz each (I'm guessing).

    Lots of alternate ways to improve heat -- hot water bottles (zero weight), good hat & socks, proper sleepwear, candle lantern inside tent, etc.

    Frankly I usually stay warmer in a tarp with a fire, but I don't mind having critters sniffing my eyeballs while I sleep.
     
  10. Davros

    Davros Guide Bushclass II

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    I put an E blanket over my tent but under the rain fly and it made a noticeable difference. My tent is an REI quarter dome T3 plus and is mostly no-seeum netting so i had ventilation. The only heat source was battery operated christmas lights. I used a 35 degree bag and insulated air pad. The temp got down to 2 degrees. I was fine as long as I stayed in the bag. I think a UCO lantern would have made a huge difference.

    [​IMG]

    More pics from that night. http://s596.photobucket.com/albums/tt50/chrisnimon/BushcraftUSA/Outings/Outing%201/
     
  11. Matrix

    Matrix Scout Bushclass I

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    Yea, I didn't want to block the venting but thought it would trap some heat in. I did get a new sleeping bag, a Kelty Cosmic 20 Down. I know it's not the best but from reviews they seem to be good. Plus if I'm not 100% satisfied with it I can return it to REI.
    I have used the hand warmers, I have put 3 in my bag and my feet still got cold. Maybe I need to get a good pair of wool socks instead using my regular cotton socks.
     
  12. Panzer

    Panzer Prepared Wanderer Supporter Bushclass I

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    That would help. Plus putting on dry socks before bed. Don't sleep in sweaty socks.
     
  13. R_W

    R_W Guide

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    CLEAN DRY socks and long underwear (bushcraft jammies) make a huge difference, as does a spongebath before bed.

    Using an e blanket to partially close off a tent can work, but it can also prevent any good sleep from noise instead of cold.
     
  14. GA_MTN_MAN

    GA_MTN_MAN Scout

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    Just before bed, heat some water (not boiling) and put it in a Nalgene bottle. Slide a sock over that and keep it in your sleeping bag. You would be suprised how well that works for several hours.
    Make sure you have a good vapor barrier (foot print) under your tent and a good pad. You should be fine i that area. Hopefully it WILL be cold and the mice will stay away. Near the shelters they are like an army.
     
  15. Gerald_G

    Gerald_G Scout Bushclass I

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    On the subject of sleeping socks, I always ensure that I have a clean dry pair for sleeping in (Wool or blend) and that these have loose or no ankle elastic. I feel that elastic around the ankle can limit circulation to the feet and they'll be colder.

    Have you considered down booties?
     
  16. Bouncer871

    Bouncer871 Scout

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    If you have a fire going to stay warm nothing is going to come near you. Most animals have a natural fear of fire. That is of course if using a tarp setup and not a tent.
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2012

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