Flintlocks!!!

Discussion in 'Firearms' started by oldsoldier, Mar 4, 2013.

  1. oldsoldier

    oldsoldier Guide Bushclass I

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    I had the opportunity to shoot my first black powder rifle this weekend, and it was an old style flintlock. I was at a friends shooting range, and a guy on the line had one. As this type of firearm I have zero familiarity with, I asked him about a million questions. He had built it from parts, which he acquired over time. Its his 3rd one. It was a .45 caliber one, I have no idea the model, so, please, dont ask :).
    The double trigger is intriguing, but really neat. I found that the delay, between the flash pan and the firing, at first, was odd. I have heard many people talk of it, I was aware of it, but, well, experiencing it was kind of cool. I shot twice, and, here are my observations, from a complete newb:
    These rifles are actually surprisingly lights, for their size. I expected a beefier feel to it, with the length of the barrel, but it was actually quite manageable.
    The delay between trigger pull & actual expulsion of the projectile forces one to have good shooting discipline. Flinching will assure a miss. Period.
    This rifle was truly a work of art. Its asthetically pleasing to the eye, and something I may look into in the future
    Now, I have a few questions. First, living in MA, we only have 3 ways to hunt; bow, shotgun, and black powder. I am planning on bowhunting this year, but, I think I may try black powder next year. I spoke with the gentleman who let me shoot his flintlock, and we discussed weather issues-primarily, rain when using it. Now, I know black powder & rain dont mix. But, how important is it to keep the flint & striker plate dry? This may seem like an obvious question, but, I honestly dont know, and didnt think to ask. If someone here uses a flintlock in inclement weather, what are the methods for keeping this dry? As much as I loved the flintlock, I think that, for now, I may be leaning more towards a cap & ball black powder, simply for the weather here, which can literally be anything during hunting season.
    I am now hooked though. I am really looking into assembling one of these myself. It may be a project over time, but, I would love to own one of these someday, for fun, possibly hunting, and definitely for the artistry some of these posess!
     
  2. rob/saltrock

    rob/saltrock Scout

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    I have flintocks and each is a little different on the hang time and the locks waterproofness.
    If its just a quick shower i turn the rifle upside down and tuck the lock under my armpit. If it looks like its gonna rain for a while i brush out the pan, put a dab of grease on the bottom of the frizzen and then hold the lock upside down under my armpit.

    Rob/saltrock


    Your rifle will vary
     
  3. oldbow

    oldbow Scout

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    Rain= Two items I have found that work for flintlock, a feather in the touch hole.

    Also a piece of greased leather to cover the pan/ lock area. Called a calfs knee.

    Do not prime until you are ready to shoot, keep your barrel down.
     
  4. Scott Allen

    Scott Allen Guide

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    Firstly, a good flintlock that is "timed" well, should not have a big noticeable delay (called lock time). It should be almost instantaneous. As has been mentioned, a period correct way to protect your lock area from rain and snow is a greased cows knee. I also smear a bead of grease around the edge of the pan before putting the frizzen down. To assure that I get ignition, I also use 3F powder in the pan as priming rather than 4F. 4F draws moisture quicker. I also change my priming powder often throughout the day to ensure it is dry when the moment of truth arrives. Have fun!

    Scott
     
  5. oldsoldier

    oldsoldier Guide Bushclass I

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    I couldnt tell you what the ACTUAL delay was, but, it is noticeable-coming from modern firearms. It was in the 10ths of seconds, I would guess. Enough to notice, and, as I wasnt used to it, it was certainly different.
    Thanks all to the methods you use to keep these dry. I kind of figured not to put priming powder into the flashpan until ready to shoot. I really want to build one of these, if for nothing else, than the novelty of saying I built it, and shoot it :).
     
  6. Jeffro

    Jeffro Scout Bushclass I

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    I have shot a flinter for many years now and the rifle I own is a Tenesee Mountain Rifle that a fine gunsmith built from a kit and I suffer no perceptable locktime. The Gunsmith who built this weapon tuned the lock by polishing the moving surfaces the same way you polish a trigger sear, he then drilled out the touch hole to the next NUMBER SIZE drill bit to increase heat transfer. Pay attention I now give to you a pearl of wisdom, "on the prarie", just as it was given to me. Heat not flame through the touch hole is what ignites the main powder charge so do not fill the pan to it's utmost capacity and before firing tip the pan away from the barrel to move the prime to the outside of the pan so you have an unobstructed touch hole for the heat to travel through. This act alone should eliminate locktime
     
  7. hunter63

    hunter63 Bushmaster

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    Yup..........
     
  8. mlp2147

    mlp2147 The "retired" Gunny Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I have been lusting after a flintlock for a good long while. I look at hunting the way I look at a lot of things in life. Why make things so easy that there isn't a challenge at all? I like the older things in life ( to a point ) and the nostalgia behind them. Currently I bow hunt exclusively but when I start my black powder hunting it will be by way of the flint lock.
     
  9. Thaddius Bickerton

    Thaddius Bickerton Guide

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    Growin' up the flintlock users put a "mules ear" which I suspect is same as a calf's knee over the lock to keep it dry .

    Nothing wrong with starting out with a flintlock if that is what tickles your fancy.

    A well set up lock, using ffffg powder for priming and fffg for the main charge (up to 50 caliber) is the best choice. Given a choice I would like "french flints" (used to be able to buy them, sadly the supply is long gone)

    The lock time with a proper charge and flint is negligible.

    Without being there I suspect that more modern priming of a coarser nature and probably a coarser main powder were used. Perhaps also the priming pan was "over filled"?

    To add to your black powder knowledge, the rifling twist rate impacts the choice of projectiles and charges. a 1 turn in 66 inches twist or slower (2nd number higher) tends to favor patched round balls. A faster twist such as 1 turn in 48 inches tends to favor conical maxi-balls.

    By adjusting the powder charge one can get good accuracy with patched balls in a faster twist, sadly, the slower twist just will not stabilize the longer conical as well.

    A percussion lock (well maintained) performs similar to a modern cartridge. All one needs to do is pay attention to the charge and cleaning etc. If you soften a dab of wax and crimp it over the cap it tends to pretty much waterproof the percussion nipple.

    Also if you manage to look at older original rifles and shotguns (fowling pieces / muskets etc) they often had a "cork" stopper to keep moisture out of the barrel. For modern usage a simple piece of electricians tape serves as well and blows off when you discharge the piece. (Also a balloon or condom can serve to keep water out of your barrel.)


    I'm not gonna go into modern in line percussion sabot firing rifles because they do not appeal to me any more than arrow launching machines do (compound bows). Nothing wrong with them, just not something I care for, tried them out and then went backwards where I usually prefer either a hawkin style percussion or a Kentucky style flinter.

    Also (not sure if it is a gobt approved hunting tool) but the older sharps rifles offered a lot. The 1863 was a breach loading weapon that used "paper cartridges" and a percussion cap to fire. These were as capable as the 1874 metallic cartridge firearms but used "nitrated paper" (think cigarette rolling papers) that burnt up when fired. The breach cut open the rear of the cartridge as it closed, and then you capped the nipple and fired it. (I have heard of just loading a bullet with loose powder behind it, but never tried it. Nitrated paper can be made by getting some salt peter and soaking cigarette papers in it then drying them and rolling them around a dowel then glue in a bottom or twist the bottom closed, put in the charge, use a string or glue and tie in the bullet.

    If you can get a replica Enfield or Springfield "war of northern aggression" rifled musket it makes a fine hunter. Also the earlier "Mississippi rifles" will do the trick. These are front loaders so should come under the black powder muzzle loader regulations. Being in 58 - 62 caliber usually they pack considerable wallop and would be fine for most anything one chose to shoot.

    Do not underestimate the "trade rifles" which are often 69 caliber (20 gauge) smooth bore flinters. These can fire both shot, buck n ball , or ball or mini bullets. Treat them similar to a slug gun for hunting purposes of large game, and switch to shot for birds, squirrels, rabbit and such. A good foraging choice IMHO.

    If you wish to build a rifle, consider getting a copy of Dixie Gun Works catalog. (Great reading even if you don't care for traditional stuff.) Also they carry a lot of things like tinder box, and period clothing etc.

    Be warned, once you go down the buck skinner road, you will find it an addictive hobby. One that builds confidence in your ability to feed yourself and loaf in the bush as long as you wish.

    There are many rendezvous that you can attend to explore more of this if it please you.

    Keep your powder dry and your top knot safe.

    Thad
     
  10. oldsoldier

    oldsoldier Guide Bushclass I

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    Thad, to be honest-thats my fear. Going down this road, never to return!!! But, I think I would be OK with that :).
    I will definitely give dixie gun works a look-as I am just dipping my toes in, and fear I will be jumping in to the deep end, clothes and all, before too long. I am OK with that too though!!!

    To everyone offering advice, thank you. I have been around firearms since I was young-shooting with my dad, 13 years in the Army as an Infantryman, serving on several different crew served platforms, earning my armorers certificate-but, I have zero experience with the older shooting arts. And, I am truly looking forward to this journey!
     
  11. Mutno

    Mutno Tracker

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    The down side of a long gun, whether flint or cap, is that the stock is pinned to the barrel. The barrel actually supports the stock. This makes it more time consuming to clean as it takes many patches to do the job. A patent breach, think Hawken short stock, is much easier as you pull the wedge, unhook the barrel, and put the breach end in a sink of hot soapy water. Then just run the patch back and forth until the water comes clean through the nipple or touch hole.

    I built both a .32 cal squirrel gun and a chief's grade trade gun in the eighties, both with Siler flint locks but don't shoot them nearly as much as I did my first which was a Thompson Hawken kit.
     
  12. mischief

    mischief Guide

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    I have gone down the flintlock road and I will never go back.Look into installing a White Lightnin SS Vent Liner.

    Keep your powder dry and your dobber up
     
  13. stormpriest

    stormpriest Scout

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    some weapons bragged of a "weather proof" lock, the 1803 Harpers Ferry was one of those, .54 cal., half stocked for quick break down and cleaning and all the metal has been browned, rather than blued.

    These can be had pre fabbed (AKA not kits but ready to fire) at dixie gun works. www.dixiegunworks.com
     
  14. Todd Bradshaw

    Todd Bradshaw Banned Member Banned

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    I've seen frizzen covers before, and if you're sitting in the rain, waiting for something edible to walk by I suspect it wouldn't be hard to build a little "lock poncho" that covers the whole hammer, pan, frizzen area and ties underneath (Velcro would be handy, but the noise it makes when you unhook it might be a serious problem). I've also observed that the black powder substitutes seem to be more prone to picking up moisture than the real deal, so I tend to avoid them (confession: I also like that sulpher smell of real BP).

    This may seem kind of silly, but when teaching my wife to shoot a flintlock without flinching, I told her this:
    "It's pretty much a matter of mind-set and anticipating what is going to happen. When you shoot the percussion rifle or cartridge rifle, your mind is thinking that you'll pull the trigger and it will go 'boom'.That's what you are anticipating. With the flintlock, I want you to think and anticipate that you'll pull the trigger and the rifle will go 'kaboom' instead of just 'boom'. If you prepare your brain for that slight hitch in the delivery, then when the boom does come, it won't be a surprise."

    In some ways, shooting the big Sharps is similar, even though it's a cartridge gun since that big hammer has to swing so far after you pull the trigger (plus, you know your shoulder is going to get pounded pretty good when it does go off). Adjusting your brain to the lock time of the gun seems to be the key, and for some folks thinking kaboom will help do it.

    Also check out "Track Of The Wolf" for BP guns and supplies. Good folks and some nice rifles and high-end custom kits (more involvd than the mass production kits, but higher quality).

    http://www.trackofthewolf.com
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2013
  15. aw738

    aw738 Banned Member Banned

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    I don't have any expriance with flintlock or caplock black powder but I do have an inline. I would like to have a Civil War era Sprinfield replica. Don't let anyone tell you that an inline is modern. It was invented the same year that Daniel Boone was born.
     
  16. tree-ratsniper

    tree-ratsniper Guide

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    Pretty soon flintlocks will consume your thoughts! I grew up shooting bolt guns & never would have imagined becoming a "traditional muzzle-loader." Then a buddy turned me to the "holy black" side... ;)
     
  17. Bartnmax

    Bartnmax Scout

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    Blackpower shooting involves quite a few 'nuances' which need to be properly learned.
    Things such as which ball to use, best patch material, learning to 'read' your patches when developing loads, etc.
    For that reason I believe that the newbie is usually better off starting with a caplock rather than a flintlock.
    The caplock is just that touch easier to master than is the flintlock.
    It's also a touch better to hunt with for the newbie as it is more weatherproof.

    Once you've been at it for a while, & you're developing a good understanding of the 'art' that is BP shooting, I would then say start thinking about a flintlock arm.
    You'll have a better idea of what's involved & which FL best suits your shooting/hunting needs.
    You'll also be better equipt to think about maybe having a custom FL 'front stuffer' made - then you'll really appreciate the art of BP shooting from a whole new level.
    A poor quality flintlock can put you off BP shooting for good as it can be a niughtmare just to get on target, but a fine custom FL that shoots well is a real pleasure to shoot & own, & will give you a whole new respect for our forefathers & how they lived & survived with BP arms.

    Good luck mate.
     
  18. pacondor

    pacondor Scout

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    You're done now. Its got ya. I hunted my first 2 years ('92-93) with a Thompson Hawken kit rifle my Grandfather built for me. I got back into it about 3 years ago and killed my first blackpowder deer this January. We hunt rain, sleet, snow. Light flurries/drizzle I'll just throw my handkerchief over the lock. Rain/snow I've got a piece of inner tube cut to length and sliced open. Drape it over the lock and gun voila! You can also put a little bore butter along your barrel to keep water from running down into the pan. A dab of butter over the barrel and you're waterproof. As far as powder 7f in the pan goes off like a rifle but draws any moisture from the air. I use 4f pan/ 2f barrel and it seems to work pretty good for me. Also, try to use the least amount of flash pan powder possible. Find how much powder is required to touch off the gun.(powder and no ball). Use just a bit more than the required minimum The more powder you use in the pan the longer the delay. For lead I use round balls I pour myself. My gun is 1:48 so it doesn't shoot the maxi balls very well. As for the addiction, I really think the sulphur smell has something to do with it. lol
     
  19. ron d

    ron d Scout Bushclass I

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    I have a couple you can shoot.

    I have a .62 caliber (20 gauge) smooth bore fusee (trade gun) and .50 pistol(rifled) that a friend of mine from NH. built. That you are welcome to shoot.

    ron d
     
  20. hunter63

    hunter63 Bushmaster

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    Curious
    What dia ball are you using for the trade gun?......
     
  21. Paul Foreman

    Paul Foreman Bushmaster

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    i have long fancied a 20- or 28-gauge flintlock fowler, set up for ball ...
     
  22. Scott Allen

    Scott Allen Guide

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    I use a .600 ball with an .015 patch in front of 65 grains of 3F. Works real well. I put a rear sight on mine and it shoots like a rifle out to 75 yards, then accuracy starts dropping off a little.

    I love the versatility of a smoothbore. I've killed everything from deer down to rabbits and squirrels with mine using shot or ball. I have one that is "jug choked" and it is death on turkeys! I definetly don't use roundball in it though!

    Scott
     
  23. hunter63

    hunter63 Bushmaster

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    Thanks, I need to come up with a load for a French Fusil, .62 cal....(20 ga)....have a choice of .595, .600, .610 from Track of the Wolf....so want to come up with a load before buying a mold....
    use the .015 thousandths patch in my .50 rifles.....
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2013
  24. stormpriest

    stormpriest Scout

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    well, to give you a comparison, my Howdah pistol is 20 ga, and it is advised I go for the .600 mould as the .595s I bought premade went into the bore a little too easily. Like, w my thumb by accident while I was "holding it in place" reaching for my short starter... *thump* went right in. As for shooting at the range, yeah, sure. but on a hunt? no, needs a stiffer mount so the second round doesnt rattle loose.

    In short, .600 mould (bag mould at track of the wolf is $40) and probably some wehre between .015 and .018 patching.
     
  25. stormpriest

    stormpriest Scout

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    45 years old, 30 years on roads and trails... and can not spell for :56: sorry bout my "French" I am apparently fluent.
     
  26. mischief

    mischief Guide

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    In a smooth bore during a woods walk I start out using .600 ball then switch to .595 after 7 shots.

    Have started to use tow over powder then tow again over the ball for faster loading during a Seneca run,need all the help I can get when up against the young 55 yr olds
     
  27. ron d

    ron d Scout Bushclass I

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    60 w/ a patch
     
  28. Ascham

    Ascham Scout

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    2x - this is the way to go. Hunted with flintlocks for years and no problems in rain or snow.
     
  29. tree-ratsniper

    tree-ratsniper Guide

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    That's why I want a smoothbore, we have an overabundance of turkeys around here & have never had any of the neighbors tell me no when I ask if I can hunt em... :57:
     
  30. Gruxxx

    Gruxxx Scout Bushclass I

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    Keeping your powder dry is all part of the game. :) Fortunately, it's not that difficult. If you spend the money on a decent gun, it should have a good lock that allows the frizzen to seat dead flush with the pan. This alone makes a pretty good moisture seal. Wrap a cow's knee around the lock if you want to keep it dry in damp weather. Carry it in a wool gun sock if you want to keep it still drier. Keep it in an oiled leather gun sock for the ultimate in protection. Personally, I've hunted in driving wet snow, sleet, and freezing rain with either a cow's knee or wool gun sock. Those have kept the gun dry enough to touch off when I've emptied the gun at the end of the day.
     
  31. WindWalker

    WindWalker SourDough Lifetime Supporter

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    Mr.stormpriest,
    If you would not mind my asking, what amount of powder charge are you using with the PRB?
    Ours is made by Pedersoli. Your's?
    Best Wishes
     
  32. stormpriest

    stormpriest Scout

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    yup, the same, a Perdisoli. I'm using 30 to 40 2FF per barrel. Tho, one thing I can say is, 777? Not bad, but no where near as good as the real thing. I also noted more power/kick when using Goex. Was just throwing RBs down the range for sh*ts n giggles, but still noticed that w the 777, I had to "reprime" the barrels 3 out of 4 shots. That is, unscrewing the nipple ( God I hope no one googles this) and pouring a lil more powder in there before it wld go off.
     
  33. diannamarsolek

    diannamarsolek Tracker

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    i like my

    50 cal flint lock and have used it up here in the great north wet
     
  34. Bartnmax

    Bartnmax Scout

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    I have a gun sock made from oilskin that is wool lined & it's simply unbeatable for keeping my front stuffer dry.
    Not hard to make (I didn't make mine - friend did).
    Would make a great bushcraft project if ya looking for something to do on a rainy night.
    The cow's knee certainly keeps the FLs shootable in bad weather although I still prefer a caplock if hunting in bad weather.
    A touch of candle wax around the nipple & it's pretty much weatherproof unless you get water down the spout.
     
  35. Thaddius Bickerton

    Thaddius Bickerton Guide

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    Just some random thoughts while reading further into this

    A hooked breach in a half stock in 50 caliber with a percussion lock is a great starting (and finishing if you like them) point.

    Double set triggers are my preference over single triggers

    Seems I recall T/C or some hawkins offered both percussion and flint locks that could be swapped out but I may just be faulty on that memory.

    Lot of the older (origional) BP weapons had barrels of soft iron that you could actually shave with a knife. As they shot out (the rifling wore out) a new cherry (a larger round ball thing used to cut a new mould was made and the barrel re-rifled (freshed out). This is why some odd ball sized barrels are to be found.

    I lately prefer a 50 but 40 or 45 are useful for most things also. If one has a simple T/C type hawken in .45 caliber , uses a 400 or so grain boolet with 70 - 120 grains of BP then you are duplicating the balistics of the BP 45/70 cartridge (or 45/120 etc).

    For some reason a round ball kills out of all proportion to what the numbers indicate it would do.

    Lot of folk use "short starters" but I have found the handle of my patch knife to seat a patched ball, followed with choking up on the ramrod to shove it a bit works for me.

    Be sure to get a "ball puller" n Patch worm and a few cleaning attachments for your ramrod.

    I have been told by old timers that after shooting "peeing" down the barrel was one way to clean out the barrel, but no solid research on that other than hear say.

    If using a longrifle with pinned barrel, having a piece of tubing / something like a nipple / plug to fit the touch hole etc lets you pour hot water down the barrel to help clean it out. Also the tubing in a pot of hot water and a tight patch and you can kind of suck the water up and down to swab out the barrel.

    A hooked breach with wedges is much easier to clean, I have often just pulled such and cleaned em in the sink / bath tub.

    Also try to avoid petroleum products as they seem to enhance fouling. (bore butter is a good commercial option for most uses.) (Bear grease is my preference if I can get it.)

    I'm kinda having a brain drizzle at the moment, but want to try to set this down as I'm gonna need to rest in a bit. (some days the stroke effects seem stronger than others and at the moment my head is buggin me.)

    I also am thinking of making myself a nice 12 bore rifle (At first I was thinking a double, but that may be to difficult so maybe just a real fine single barrel.) May even look into a 10 or 8 bore.

    Now those are huge game / African calibers, but I suspect that they would put down a elk or moose or griz just fine n final.

    Plus they plain ol' shine.

    Remember that ya need a possible bag to carry your shooting stuff. Start looking for horns to make up your own powder horns, (these can be true works of art, n if polished enough become translucent n ya can see your powder through the horn to see about how much you have.)

    If you want another idea get a piece of wood and drill a hole into one end and fit it with a stopper to hold a powder charge. Then bore cross ways the other end and seat a patched round ball. Just pour the powder down, flip n seat the ball by holding the other end over the barrel n ramming it in part way, then remove n finish seating it.

    Mark your ramrod both unloaded and loaded with a ring around it so putting it down the barrel confirms it is loaded or unloaded.

    Buy spare ramrods, nothing stinks like breaking one and not having a replacement. (the fiberglass type may not be traditional but hold up better.

    Somewhere around her i have what looks like a derringer pistol, but you put a dab of powder in the barrel and shove a candle into the barrel wick near the powder n then when you touch off the thing it ignites and lights the candle. (Think I got if from dixiegunworks back in the 80's but memory is weak on that)

    Heck, guess I"m just off on a old man's ramble today, but I love watching folk start doing something that adds so much to fun in the woods.

    Oh, if you can find a .32 squirrel rifle, they pretty much fill the 22LR bill for playing n hunting, but you need to swab out more as the smaller bore tightens up after only a few rounds. I usually opt for my 36 when hunting small game just on account of it is a tad easier.

    Make yourself a set of crossed sticks n see if that helps your shooting also.

    Howda pistols, I been meaning to try out a set of those. Saw one made to take regular 12 gauge shells once, but never got to shoot it.

    Sorry for the long ramble, but , well thanks for letting me just enjoy thinking about stuff.

    Thad.
     
  36. tickflicker

    tickflicker Supporter Supporter

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    Started out with a Dixie southern rifle changed the lock pretty fast to a WL Cockren fit pretty close a Bob Roller would work to. but to be honest a flintlock is a learning curve. If it is all you shoot it aint so bad. you should also know that store bought is not the same as what you can build. parts just not as good. If you can check out Caywood in Berry-ville Arkansas.
     
  37. hunter63

    hunter63 Bushmaster

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    Thanks Thad......
    Great summary of little details things.....

    Peeing down the barrel, was kinda a poor man's ammonia solution that cuts BP crud nicely....not really needed these days...also was said to be used in the old military rifles with the old corrosive powders and primers (read Nagants), and said to be the reason for a "dark bore".

    Also rumored was the "peeing on a barrel in white' allowing it to rust, then oiling and polishing.....or "Browning the metal".

    When shooting at game, either looking under the smoke, or running up thru it to see if your shot was true.....Works.

    Rather than fiberglass as a hunting loading rod and wiping stick, go with composite, it doesn't shave off and make little glass splinters to get in your hand, is easier on the rifling at the muzzle, doesn't swell in bad weather, (like wood)...nothing more frusteration than to have your ramrod stick in the tubes when wanting a second shot.

    Do not take composite or fiberglass rod to a primitive shoot.....I don't use the rod in the gun at the range, but a longer loading rod, and separate 'wiping stick"

    Half the fun is making you horn and bag.

    They are fun.....nothing is like trying to hit a "running deer" (target on cable) from horse back (55 gal drum w/saddle on) springs.....The second shot is really a trip.......
     
  38. hunter63

    hunter63 Bushmaster

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    Thanks, ordered up a mold and some .600 balls......

    Found a assortment of wads at Cabales, has both over powder and over shot in the same bag.....for starters.


    http://www.cabelas.com/product/East...or+shot+guns&WTz_l=Header;Search-All+Products
    I think a wad cutter would be in order if you are gonna shoot a lot of smooth bore shot gun loads, though.
     
  39. chiefs50

    chiefs50 Banned Member Banned

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    Barrels can vary in size. Not all .62 cals are created equal. Most .62's measure closer to .610. It is always advisable to try several size balls/patch combinations before ordering a mould. My Colerain barrel mic's out at .612. A .600 ball is too tight unless I am shooting bare ball. I now shoot .595's out of a Jeff Tanner mould. I may order a .590 from him as I would like to use a thicker patch. I highly recommend Jeff. He makes a quality brass mould for a reasonable price. If you have trouble finding the size ball you need, I'm sure some of us can provide a few to try. http://www.jt-bullet-moulds.co.uk/
     
  40. stormpriest

    stormpriest Scout

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    check out the wad column pieces they have there at TotW as well. It's a 3 part wad column; felt wad goes on top of the powder charge, then the cushion (self evident in appearance) then yer shot and then the white "card board wad as a sot "keeper.
    They also have prefabbed single and dbl 0 buck shot by the pound I believe.
    As to powder charges, my howdah takes a light charge by comparison, same bore/ caliber, but the barrels are 11 inches. I wld guess the "medium" load for yours wld be rough about 90 2FF. Then again, every weapon has it's "sweet point" and it takes range time and sometimes a fair bit o patience.
     
  41. hunter63

    hunter63 Bushmaster

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    Thanks boys....I have been shooting BP for a lot of years, and figuring out loads....so that half the fun.
    This is a my first experience with a smooth bore.

    Barrel is a Dixie Gun works on a "built Fusil"
    [​IMG]
     
  42. Paul Foreman

    Paul Foreman Bushmaster

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    very nice, hunter ...
     
  43. hunter63

    hunter63 Bushmaster

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    Thanks , I was lusting after it for a while....guy that builds them camps behing me on the next row.....so I have to walk past all the time.....LOL
    Second one I bought from him.
     
  44. chiefs50

    chiefs50 Banned Member Banned

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    I get my wads and cards from Circle Fly. Sometimes TOTW is not the cheapest source and it pays to shop around. http://www.circlefly.com/html/products.html
     
  45. mario

    mario Scout

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    Uh, not really. Completely different animal. They didn't have percussion caps, 209 primers, stainless steel, synthetic stocks, pelletized powder, synthetic blackpowder and saboted, jacketed bullets.

    Nice try though.


    I started out with a Pedersoli Frontier Rifle. Caplock, .36 caliber. REALLY accurate with 30grs of FFFG. Shot many Spruce Grouse an Ptarmagin with it.

    Then I found flintlocks...:dblthumb:


    Been shooting flintlock exclusively since 2002. As has been said, a well made flintlock will fire as fast as a caplock.

    The fastest lock time I've had was with a Caywood Wilson Trade gun. Next fastest is a Mike Brooks Carolina Gun/Type G (this is my current favorite).


    Mario
    PS- Windex (the one with ammonia) is about the best BP cleaner around.
     
  46. stormpriest

    stormpriest Scout

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    I didn't have the heart to break that bubble. Mainly cuz I didn't wanna start yet another useless argument.
    I have both cap and flint... kinda torn cuz I love my Howdah in spite of it being a cap lock.
     
  47. mario

    mario Scout

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    I have also noticed that my flintlocks are more reliable than my caplocks. I think it's because by their very nature, flinters need a little more care and I know that. Whereas I didn't always take the same care of my caplocks.

    Mario
     
  48. oldbow

    oldbow Scout

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    Back in the 70s got the bug. Had a Hawken built by a friend. Then I went to the " Dark Side" = Flintlocks! Built many myself and have owned guns by some of the great gunsmiths

    Jud Brennan and Frank House to name two, got paranoid caring a 3k gun around. Built a smooth 60 cal. rev.war ara gun and had much more fun. (See; Show your leather work post #357)

    Anyway; Keep it simple and buy Quality, There are a lot of very good gun builders out there at very reasonable price, do a search.

    Read Allen Ecker's book The Frontearsman It will realy mess up your mind.

    NOTE; Inlines are NOT muzzel loaders....
     
  49. aw738

    aw738 Banned Member Banned

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    OK I was off by several years. It was patented in 1808 by a Swiss man named Pauley. So I don't consider it modern.
     
  50. hunter63

    hunter63 Bushmaster

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    The important thing is you are getting out there an shooting it....these days gun owners shouldn't be so picky.

    That is an argument that may rage on forever.......LOL

    Had a guy not allowed to shoot a ML shoot with a "Match lock" in full Spanish conquistador armor...Too early....?

    Most states will allow in-lines for muzzle loader hunting, some even allow a 45/70 as it was a historic cartridge (although limited to single shots)....some don't,.... flinters only.

    Check you local laws and regs.....
     

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