Homemade powdered eggs - a review

Discussion in 'Food' started by Old Philosopher, Apr 21, 2011.

  1. Old Philosopher

    Old Philosopher Banned Member Banned

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    This could just as easily gone in the 'preparedness' section.
    Sorry, no pictures this time.

    Over the past 3-4 days, I've been experimenting with making my own powdered eggs. After some consideration, I decided to use the raw egg method because I wanted egg powder, not reconstituted scrambled eggs.

    I started out with 4 dozen eggs. I whipped them up just as I would to cook scrambled eggs. I have the equivalent of a Garden Master food dehydrator with a thermostat control. I also have the 'fruit roll up tray liners' that come with the machine.

    It turned out that 1 dozen scrambled eggs would exactly fill one tray. I took the four filled trays and turned the dehydrator up to 165 F to kill any nasties in the raw eggs. I left them at 165 F for about 3 hours. At that point, I turned it down to 115 F and dried the trays for about 18 hours. When I checked them, they were still a little oily, so I let them go for another 6 hours.

    After they were dried, I crumbled them into a blender. I have a Vita-Mix blender that I use to grind wheat, rice and barley flour. It has a pulse capability, and a "reverse" setting on it. I ground up the eggs the same way I would whole grains, by pulsing the blades, and reversing them each time. I didn't want to just turn it on and let it go, because the heat generated by the friction with the blades could 'cook' the eggs. The ratio turned out to be 2 parts egg powder, 3 parts water.

    Out of 4 dozen eggs, I ended up with 1 quart of product, about the consistency of corn meal. Now for the test!

    I reconstituted the eggs in warm water. I wanted them the runny, like thin pancake batter. The tendency is to use too little water, but think about how 'runny' a fresh egg is. I let them rehydrate for about 15 minutes, and then added a splash more water. They looked surprisingly like whipped, fresh eggs.

    I poured them into a hot skillet and stirred them as they cooked. Whoa! They LOOKED like scrambled eggs. Taste test. Whoa! They even TASTED like scrambled eggs! Full flavor, and a whole lot better than any commercial powdered eggs I've ever eaten, including Egg Beaters.

    The experiment was a success, and I have another 8 dozen scheduled for the same treatment. I would say the secret for frying powdered eggs is to get the mixture thin enough, whip a bunch of air into it with a fork, or whisk, and stir them in the pan. If you just plop in a glob of thick paste, you're gonna get an egg pancake that doesn't taste like either eggs, or pancakes. ;)

    FWIW.....YMMV.
     
  2. Plains Woman

    Plains Woman Guest

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    Wow, I need to get a dehydrator! I am currently overrun with eggs (as it sounds like you are). It never would have occurred to me in a million years to do this. Very cool!
     
  3. Bucketosudz

    Bucketosudz ARTISAN ATTRIBUTES Supporter

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    Have you eaten Egg Beaters for comparison OP? Thanks for sharing your experimentation, I may have to give it a try as well. Did you find that the fan from the dehydrator "splashed" the egg at all?
     
  4. Marsh

    Marsh Guide

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    You and I must be thinking the same thing on eggs OP. :) I read that most are freeze dried and was going to put my machine into the freezer and run it with scrambled (not cooked eggs) in the trays.

    Will you still play it safe and keep your dried eggs in a freezer environment until wanting to use?

    Have you tried using your eggs in baking? Like a cake mix for instance? Or a bread mix requiring eggs?

    I'm anxious to see how more of your experiments work.

    Marsh.
     
  5. Old Philosopher

    Old Philosopher Banned Member Banned

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    That's why I referenced Egg Beaters in my OP. These are better.
    The way these better quality round dehydrators are designed, the air flows across the trays. That's why you can use the nylon 'roll up' trays, because the air doesn't need to blow up through the product. I've consistently dried herbs as fine a thyme, and the product doesn't blow around at all.

     
  6. MK-9

    MK-9 Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    Very interesting post / experiment man. Thanks.
     
  7. Blazin

    Blazin Guide

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    Wow and my wife has been begging me for a food dehydrator. Thanks for the post!
     
  8. Seeker

    Seeker Woods Bum Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    Just want to add a little bit on 'shelf life'.

    i did this back on January 15th. I put them in an old vitamin/supplement bottle and stuck them in the cabinet over the fridge (the one my wife can't reach, and where she lets me keep my camping food, cooking gear, and experiments like this one!) 3 months later, they still smell fine and have not (as far as my nose can tell) gone bad.
     
  9. DancesWithaTrout

    DancesWithaTrout Guest

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    I still have nightmares of green eggs from when I was in the service and eating C-Rats and LRRPs....... Brrrrrrrrrrrrr-Shiver-hack-hack.......

    As long as they stay yellow or white, I am good......
     
  10. HoosierArcher

    HoosierArcher Banned Member Banned

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    Thanks OP for doing the experiment and sharing it.
     
  11. wsdstan

    wsdstan Guide

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    Thanks OP, that sure beats carrying eggs around in my egg case and hoping I didn't break any on the way in.
     
  12. Old Philosopher

    Old Philosopher Banned Member Banned

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    Not as over run as I get in the summer. But when I get the next 8 dozen in the dehydrator, I'll be "down" to 17 dozen in the storage fridge!
    The most I ever got back up was 52 dozen. We had frittatas, soufflets, and egg salad coming out our ears! :eek: Not to mention 20 dozen went to the local food bank.
     
  13. sotramk

    sotramk Guide

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    No salt added before dehydrating?
    Thanks for the test, good to know.
     
  14. OnTheLambWildman

    OnTheLambWildman Scout

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    I learn something new here all the time. Thanks for sharing.
     
  15. Old Philosopher

    Old Philosopher Banned Member Banned

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    No salt. No additives at all. But that raises an interesting question.
    Potassium sorbate is a common preservative as a mold and yeast inhibitor. It's in almost any dried meat, soft drink, fruit juice, yogurt or bread product you can buy. I use it to stabilize my homemade wine, and prevent spoilage.
    So...it might be reasonable to toss a little sorbate in the raw eggs before dehydrating. The shelf life might be increased significantly, as well as the safety factor.
     
  16. Two Rivers

    Two Rivers Guide

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    Thanks. I've always wanted to try this and just never had. I will definately dry some up before my next trip.
     
  17. Seeker

    Seeker Woods Bum Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    ooh. good point... yeah, i think i did add some salt, maybe a tsp, to the 6 eggs i did in january...
     
  18. wolfy

    wolfy Guest

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    This sounds like a great idea, but I don't think my rollup trays are deep enough to do more than a half dozen in each one....it would take me forever, I think. I will give it a try, though. Thanks!

    Ironically, the largest egg laying and dessicating site in the world is only about 30 miles from my front door. They make dried eggs for Betty Crocker, Duncan Hines, etc. They only sell pallet loads to commercial buyers though. Talk about opposite ends of the production scale!
     
  19. Old Philosopher

    Old Philosopher Banned Member Banned

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    I thought the same thing. I started filling them up just enough to not spill, and when the 4 dozen eggs were used up, I'd filled 4 trays. They look shallow, but I think mine are pretty standard for a 15 in dia machine.
     
  20. Campbell

    Campbell Tinder Gatherer

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    I've done this for many years and have eaten these up to a year after I made them.

    One thing I did that actually made the eggs taste better and get rid of more oil is I Froze my eggs on a cookie sheet after I scrambled them, for some reason they taste better and are easier to break up into a powder after you dehydrate them.
     
  21. Old Philosopher

    Old Philosopher Banned Member Banned

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    So, with pre-scrambling them (cooking), were you still able to use them as an egg substitute in baking, etc.?
     
  22. HillbillyBushcraft

    HillbillyBushcraft Scout

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    OP,

    Please get us some pics next time you make a bunch. I would really like to SEE how these turn out. :)
     
  23. Plains Woman

    Plains Woman Guest

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    So, if you don't mind me getting a little off topic, how to you handle and store your eggs? How long can you store them and still eat them?

    I was reading an old Mother Earth News article that said unwashed, fertile eggs can stay good if they are refrigerated for as long as six months. I have about 8 dozen eggs right now not counting the hard boiled eggs. I just can't eat them as fast as my chickens produce them. And I don't see people very often since I'm fairly isolated so I can't always give them away or sell them.

    Anyhow, just wondering what your experience is with this.
     
  24. Campbell

    Campbell Tinder Gatherer

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    Oops, sorry I did not mean Pre-Scrambled as in cooking them, I should have said I whip them first, than pour it out into a cookie sheet raw, than freeze, and after frozen, Dehydrate.
    Sorry about the bad writing.
     
  25. Old Philosopher

    Old Philosopher Banned Member Banned

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    These eggs I'm dehydrating are 8 months, at the oldest.
    If you can avoid washing them, do so. If you have to wash them (poop, mud, etc.) make sure the water is as hot as you can stand it, and hotter than the egg. Cold water opens the pores in the shell and can suck contaminants into the egg. Commercial eggs are washed and then coated with mineral oil, or another oil, to replace the natural protective coating from the hen. You can do the same thing, but I don't.
    Don't store your eggs in a 'frost-free' refrigerator. The dehumidifying effect of that type of refrigerator draws moisture from the eggs and shortens their life.
     
  26. Bush Otter

    Bush Otter Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    This thread is so good, answers so many of my questions.
     
  27. Plains Woman

    Plains Woman Guest

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    8 months? Wow! I am impressed. :)

    I do avoid washing them; I believe they last longer with the "bloom" still on them. Skid marks get scrubbed off with a damp, soft toothbrush. Otherwise I just wipe them off with a dry paper towel and then give them a more thorough wash when I'm ready to use them. If they are really, really dirty, I let the chickens keep them. lol They break their eggs fairly often so I let them keep the messy ones. I don't really care if they eat them or hatch them or what. As long as I don't have to scrub them. ;)

    I did not know that about the frost free refrigerator though. Guess now I have to find another fridge. :(

    Thanks for sharing your experience with me. :)
     
  28. Old Philosopher

    Old Philosopher Banned Member Banned

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    I'll try to take some pix during the process next time.
    This is how this batch came out. Four dozen eggs just about filled a quart jar. They aren't really powder, it's more like granulated garlic, or corn meal.

    [​IMG]
     
  29. Easy_rider75

    Easy_rider75 Supporter Supporter

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    Very cool yet another project to try someday
     

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