How do you put a new edge on a knife?

Discussion in 'Edged Tools' started by Bluegill, Jul 25, 2011.

  1. Bluegill

    Bluegill Scout Bushclass I

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    I keep seeing the phrase: "so I just put a new edge on it..." or something like that on the knife discussions. Question: Are you talking about sharpening an existing edge, or can a completely new edge be ground onto a knife as a matter of course? If so, how? Do you need a grinder or belt sander to do this? Is it hard to do? Also, can a knife edge be changed from one type (i.e. chisel grind) to another as a routine procedure? This is kind of a basic question, and maybe I am not catching the substance of the discussions exactly, but any basic info. on this is appreciated because I really do not understand it.
     
  2. Trekon86

    Trekon86 Guest

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    It *can* be done with stones but you will want a range of stones from very coarse to very fine...

    PMZ
     
  3. briarbrow

    briarbrow Banned Member Banned

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    I dont know what they mean either.

    If you consider that all you need to do to put on a "new" edge is cut something- the edge changes with every cut so it is now new lol.

    what they probably mean is they are altered the bevel is some way
     
  4. J

    J Bushwhacker Bushclass I

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    Mostly I see it as a v grind secondary edge changed into a convex edge. Either 0 degree, or with a small micro bevel. Like convexing a Becker or ESEE. You arent convexing the knife, just its edge. Also seen it dealing with getting rid of a secondary bevel on a scandi grind edge.
     
  5. EagleRiverDee

    EagleRiverDee Guide

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    I recently read up that some knife makers (such as Japanese specialty chef knives) actually ship the knives dull because each person has their own sharpening method and grind angle they use. I suspect when people say they are putting a new edge on a knife it means they are adjusting the grind angle to what suits them. The initial sharpening away from the factory angle will take some time, but after that it's your angle.
     
  6. Ratty1

    Ratty1 Guide

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    I do it all the time. With almost every knife I own I have been less than happy with the edge the factory leaves on it so I put a new edge on it. I'll change the angle to what match up for the work I do with the knife. A lot of people change it to a convex edge also for their own reasons. When I change the angle I just use stones but for a convex edge I use sandpaper and a mouse pad.
     
  7. blkbd

    blkbd Tracker

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    Most edges from a factory are put on by a employee with a belt grinder who free hands it, So the back half of the blade may have a 30 degree bevel and the near the tip it maybe some were near 45 degrees. So using a good sharpening system that can be set for more precision lets say 20 degree bevel can be used to put a new edge on and one that will be consistent from the heel to the tip.


    The other method is to re-profile the blade from a V grind to say a convex edge.


    The third is someone may be telling you your knife is dull and needs a fresh/new edge.
     
  8. insector

    insector Tracker

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    As described above, a "new" edge means it gets a new profile or angle put on it. It may be thinner for slicing or thicker for batoning with wood.........

    If the blade has a straight grind (a v grind) then I almost always convex the edge. So I say it got a new edge as opposed to sharpening the same grind that it had.................I am a huge believer in the power of a convex blade over a straight grind. A full convex grind even better. So call me controversial................:4: I think straight is a product of mass production. Convex goes back ad infinitum..................it's a natural thing, not artificial like mass produced grinds................like the man says, I could be wrong I suppose.

    I also use various grits of sandpaper for reprofiling the edge. But for sharpening I use a leather hone impregnated with a waxlike black compound colored on there from a "block". I also have a green compound for polishing and refining but the black compound does the work............


    Yep, another convex nut. It's so easy though
     

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    Last edited: Jul 25, 2011

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