Is is just me...?

Discussion in 'Fire' started by Dross, Apr 27, 2012.

  1. Dross

    Dross Guest

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Ok somethings been on my mind lately.
    The "One Stick" or "Split Wood" fire
    I'd never seen it until I found this forum and now I hardly ever start a fire with squaw wood.
    What I've noticed is that outside of our little online wilderness "Shangri la" I've not run across anyone else using/teaching/talking about this method.
    Terry can't be the only wilderness instructor that was taught/is teaching this right? Discuss
    +1 to team BCUSA for awesomeness.
    ~rob~
     
  2. Hunt4lyf

    Hunt4lyf Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2012
    Messages:
    2,540
    Likes Received:
    849
    Location:
    Colorado
    I agree. I've spent the last 30+ years in the hills, read tons of books, arcticles, etc... and I've never heard of it till coming onto this website. This place is awesome!!!
     
  3. J

    J Bushwhacker Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2009
    Messages:
    13,552
    Likes Received:
    9
    Location:
    here nor there
    Its in Air Force 64-4 and was taught to SERE instructors and students. I never heard of it before Terrys instruction either, but its one of those no brainer type things where after you do it, it just makes so much sense. I believe the Boy Scouts do it with a match for ignition. One stick one match fire drills.

    Im the same way, all of my fires have some aspect of the splitwood fire. Even bowdrill fires.

    Its a valuable skill to own, and should be practiced frequantly.
     
  4. MJDavis

    MJDavis Unworthy Field Participant Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2009
    Messages:
    4,051
    Likes Received:
    87
    Location:
    Northern Indiana
    Gregory J Davenport in his book "Wilderness Survival" alludes to the splitwood fire calling it a "heartwood" fire, but does not explictly explain as Terry does. I see a lot of Terry's other techniques in this book also. Of course I think both have USAF survival instruction experience (SERE). That may be the connection there. I too, have never heard of the technique until Terry's MWSB Class.
     
  5. J

    J Bushwhacker Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2009
    Messages:
    13,552
    Likes Received:
    9
    Location:
    here nor there
    Yeah Id say that the SERE experiance is the tie in between those two and the skill.
     
  6. FarmerJohn

    FarmerJohn Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2012
    Messages:
    217
    Likes Received:
    13
    Do y'all have a link for what a split wood fire is on here and if not could you guys elaborate?
     
  7. MJDavis

    MJDavis Unworthy Field Participant Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2009
    Messages:
    4,051
    Likes Received:
    87
    Location:
    Northern Indiana
  8. 1Jesster

    1Jesster Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2009
    Messages:
    2,144
    Likes Received:
    23
    Location:
    South West Iowa
    I stumbled across it on my own as a kid, but not to the degree I have learned hear. Now I actually know what I'm doing (kind a), and can get a fire with limited "good wood" As a kid it was just something to look cool at when the girls at camp were watching.
     
  9. 1Jesster

    1Jesster Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2009
    Messages:
    2,144
    Likes Received:
    23
    Location:
    South West Iowa
    Maybe it's just because it's Saturday morning and all but watching that video and the soft mellow town of Terry's voice just made me thing of good old Bob Ross from PBS painting a picture of a Big Tree.........


    Jesster
     
  10. stillscout

    stillscout Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2010
    Messages:
    1,562
    Likes Received:
    26
    Location:
    NC
    Cliff Jacobson demonstrates this technique in his video... The Forgotten Skills, 2004 production.
     
  11. FarmerJohn

    FarmerJohn Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2012
    Messages:
    217
    Likes Received:
    13
    O ok so its basically making kindling for a fire. I was under the impression it was a type of fire starting or build
     
  12. Iz

    Iz MEMBER of a BANNED Bushclass I Bushclass Instructor

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    May 2, 2009
    Messages:
    29,156
    Likes Received:
    262
    Location:
    The outlaw state
    Never saw it before Terrance showed me. Invaluable skill to know if you don't live where there are natural fire helpers.
     
  13. MiddleWolf

    MiddleWolf Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2011
    Messages:
    3,274
    Likes Received:
    96
    Location:
    Pacific NW
    This is a good system to know even for regular "car" camping. Occasionaly we are in a situation where a park or campsite might be devoid of much ground cover, or rules state that "tinder gathering" (even for dead wood)is forbidden. Or you may be where you either have to bring your own wood or buy it at the wood station. (some national or provincial parks are good for this). Splitting down one of your larger pieces for ease of starting gets you cooking while others are trying to start 2 or 3 inch diameter pieces any way they can. And, if you are basking in the "luxury" of car camping the use of a fro can make this a snap.

    Also it's fun in some campgrounds where the sites are close together to be able to "show off" while feathering or making tinder with the old knife. It really draws attention some times from others who have never seen it. And who knows if showing it to your neighbor doesn't solicit the offer of a free beer now and then.
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2012
  14. BBgun

    BBgun Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2011
    Messages:
    101
    Likes Received:
    0
    Basic fire making from the BSA about 1965-1975. Nice to be reminded of it and the knife technique was a nice touch. Much better then chopping your fingers off with the hatchet for smaller pieces.:21:
     
  15. riverjoe

    riverjoe Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2011
    Messages:
    8,107
    Likes Received:
    1,011
    Location:
    Northern In. On the river
    Bookmark .
     
  16. Leif

    Leif Staff Staff Member Super Moderator Vendor Bushclass I Bushclass Instructor

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2008
    Messages:
    20,689
    Likes Received:
    171
    Location:
    Adirondacks
    Skype:
    SkogKniv
    A lot of clean up just happened in this thread.

    Move back on topic. If your head is hot, then go cool off.
     
  17. IA Woodsman

    IA Woodsman Overwatch Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator Vendor Bushclass Instructor

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2008
    Messages:
    8,254
    Likes Received:
    708
    Location:
    South West IA
    Here is the deal. The splitwood fire is mainly designed to be use in wet nasty conditions. There are several reasons people like it.

    1. It works
    2. It lets you practice knife skills
    3. It is satisfying to build a fire from just one piece of wood
    4. You can justify spending a lot of money on a cool knife
    5. It can be done in almost any environment
    6. It is fun

    Is this the only technique to build a fire in wet conditions?? Heck no. I have built many squaw wood fires in wet conditions. It isn't like I invented this. It was a hard learned skill that was taught to me by very skilled instructors. I am just trying to pass on what was given to me to people who want the knowledge. Use it or use it not.
     
  18. IamLegend

    IamLegend Guide Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2010
    Messages:
    2,758
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Southern Indiana
    It is an excellent way to make a fire.
     
  19. Iz

    Iz MEMBER of a BANNED Bushclass I Bushclass Instructor

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    May 2, 2009
    Messages:
    29,156
    Likes Received:
    262
    Location:
    The outlaw state
    That took like 112 minutes to type. You guys should be honored.
     
  20. Homeslice

    Homeslice Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2009
    Messages:
    2,633
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Kansas City
    I prefer fatwood.
     
  21. Mrwhitetailfanatic

    Mrwhitetailfanatic Banned Member Banned

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2011
    Messages:
    689
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Do not trade with this memeber
    Its a good technique to know and practice. I had to make one with split wood last year at camp ground we stayed at. The place sold everyone soaking wet wood. I spent a good amount of time making my prep as it was our intended way to cook. I had so many people walk by while i was doing it say things like Hey Daniel Boone and stuff like that. Well all those people were walking up to the office to complain that they couldnt get it to burn. I remember one guy walking back as my fire was roaring asking me how I got it. He said "Your full of it. I drenched my wood with fluid and it still wouldnt light." He thought it was green LOL
     
  22. Mr.Black

    Mr.Black WILDEROXEN Tracker Pack #1 Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass Instructor

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2010
    Messages:
    8,797
    Likes Received:
    206
    Location:
    USA
    Its also used as a way to thin out the herd as far as the new aspiring SERE Lads,If you can keep it together with someone screaming at you throwing your unscoured pot,Frequent visits from the little green/Black rain cloud,getting your prep kicked all over the place and stomped out and a whole bunch of other simulated acts of Nature and Cadre assisting you on sharpening your bolt knife at a 90 degree on a rock just when they are gonna make feathers lol.
    They don't make quitters they are making Specialist and Specialist better be able to get a Fire up His or Her life may depend on it but most of all the Lives of their Students.
    Mr. Davenport has several re writes of the 64-4 and does many great things his "heartwood" rendition I can almost guarantee is the "Splitwood" technique which he I'm sure is very familiar with from his in the great Pacific North West Training

    Take care
    M/BK
     
  23. Dross

    Dross Guest

    Blog Posts:
    0
    So I leave ya'll alone with a thread for a day...
    It's funny I did not see this once in scouts. Go figure. I'm just happy I learned the skill.
    and yeah... I use it as an excuse to spend extra quality time with the sharp things.
     
  24. jloden

    jloden Guide Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2010
    Messages:
    4,478
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Hunterdon county, NJ
    Obviously this is organization-specific but the first place I heard of a one-stick fire was some article or post online about an SAR group that had a field skills test and a one stick fire was part of the "final exam" for it. The place I read this didn't offer details on the technique so after that I started searching for more info.
     
  25. Bill Cox

    Bill Cox Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2011
    Messages:
    3,084
    Likes Received:
    12
    Location:
    Derry PA
    ICQ:
    http://bushcraftusa.

    I needed a good laugh today, and that made me loose it lol, thanks!

    Thanks Bill
     
  26. evilunclegrimace

    evilunclegrimace Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2012
    Messages:
    169
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Northwest Pa.
    It is a type of fire starting used when you have limited tinder or when your wood is wet. Try it and see if you can do it with wet wood or a piece of wrist sized wood and you'll be suprised at the effectivness.
     
  27. Shone

    Shone Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2011
    Messages:
    1,011
    Likes Received:
    13
    Location:
    Dallas, TX
    As usual I come in on a discussion late but here's my 2 cents.

    Split wood was something I always did with an axe when all I had was a big chunk of wood. Tear it apart and burn it :). In all my years spent in the woods I never thought about doing it with my knife let alone battoning anything.

    Now I do it all the time. I actually prefer a split-wood fire. I works and there's no messing around.
     
  28. TaigaTreader

    TaigaTreader Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2012
    Messages:
    938
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Boise, ID
    This last weekend was the first time I've used anything but the one-stick fire in over a year-that's just because there were many thick beautiful pinecones laying around that got the logs burning with no more than a PJCB and a match. It's so failsafe you know it's going to work. If it's going to work and it's easy to make, why use anything else? And J is correct, the method is straight out of the Air Force SERE manual. In spring, with everything being wet, it's especially nice to get a nice fire roaring in 15 minutes when your buddies are all still dealing with a curtain of smoke and the snap-crackle of water being baked out with a struggling coalbase.

    Terry may not have developed it, but his youtube how-tos lay it out so well he deserves credit for presenting it to the masses.
     
  29. ZeroDarkThirty

    ZeroDarkThirty Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2011
    Messages:
    754
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    USA
    I live in the Pacific NW, and this is hands down the best most "sure fire" way Ive found to make a fire in any conditions I may encounter up here. The only reason I know about it was seeing the videos on here and on youtube, and I did it for the first time uccessfully not too long ago (and posted an excited thank you in general discussion). Nowadays I do it in the backyard on my days off for practice, knife tsting and something just fun to do when Im not working. Way better than turning on the TV, ya know?
     
  30. Tradewater

    Tradewater Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2011
    Messages:
    352
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Kentucky
    A very valuable thing to have in your skill set. Everyone should practice this. Thanks for making the video.
     
  31. Dross

    Dross Guest

    Blog Posts:
    0
    And just to clarify the OP if there's been confusion as to my meaning. I knew that Terry got it from his training. It's just dumbfounded me that it's not a more widely taught technique.
     

Share This Page