Materials for knife

Discussion in 'Edged Tools' started by Z2K, Jan 24, 2013.

  1. Z2K

    Z2K Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2012
    Messages:
    45
    Likes Received:
    0
    I was planning on making a knife or more like learning how to and was wondering what materials are needed to get started.
     
  2. Aven

    Aven Banned Member Banned

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2010
    Messages:
    5,435
    Likes Received:
    2
    Z2K, are looking to forge a knife, grind a knife or put handles on a blade blank?
     
  3. itsken78

    itsken78 Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    May 11, 2011
    Messages:
    4,390
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Citra/Ocala, FL
    well, the first thing i would suggest is do a lot of research on the process. use the google fu & this forum has some amazing knife makers who would be more than willing to answer any questions when ya get started. after researching the whole process, if you want quick & easy, get a knife kit from online someplace & finish it up. if you want to get into making it entirely yourself, get some decent steel (i suggest a good carbon steel) a file or 2, some sandpaper, & go to town. from there you can decide to heat treat yourself, or send it to somebody else to do for you if you're not ready for that leap. i'm actually in the process of making a few knives myself & have gotten some great info from here. mistakes can/will happen, just don't get discouraged & keep at it. by the way ........ WE LOVE PICS!!!
     
  4. Z2K

    Z2K Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2012
    Messages:
    45
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm looking to forge if everything turns out well.
     
  5. Z2K

    Z2K Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2012
    Messages:
    45
    Likes Received:
    0
    What kinda files do you need?
     
  6. itsken78

    itsken78 Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    May 11, 2011
    Messages:
    4,390
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Citra/Ocala, FL
    i would say at the very least a good nicholson file: mill, bastard cut, 10" long at the least. you can use it for stock removal & adding the bevels by hand. if you want more, can add some finer files to clean things up, maybe a round file, or half round file for curves.

    btw, sent you a PM
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2013
  7. Aven

    Aven Banned Member Banned

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2010
    Messages:
    5,435
    Likes Received:
    2
    A vice or a way to clamp the blade in place.
     
  8. itsken78

    itsken78 Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    May 11, 2011
    Messages:
    4,390
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Citra/Ocala, FL
    HA! yeah, can't believe i forgot that part, thanks Aven.
     
  9. Aven

    Aven Banned Member Banned

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2010
    Messages:
    5,435
    Likes Received:
    2
    itsken78 It's easy to forget. It's like a bench, we kinda assume that it will be there.

    Z2K clamping you knife can be as simple as screwing it down through the bolt holes to the edge of your bench. You'll wear you bench out if you do it a lot, but it will work for the first few knives.
     
  10. roesso

    roesso Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2011
    Messages:
    270
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Kentucky
    also you might want to get a copy of the 50 dallor knife shop that book helped me alot
     
  11. hughewil

    hughewil Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2011
    Messages:
    1,109
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Akron Ohio
    http://www.prepperlinks.net/uploads/9/0/4/0/9040002/making_simple_knives.pdf

    read that link.

    I replace the filing by hand with using my 1x30 belt sander form harbor freight that only cost $30.

    The best steel for backyard heat treating is 1084 carbon steel as it's the most forgiving and doesn't require the exact tempeture soak time of something like 1095 and quenches well in canola oil.
     

Share This Page