Mors Pot Cooking/Recipes?

Discussion in 'Cooking & Water Purification' started by Mudman, Mar 6, 2013.

  1. Mudman

    Mudman Guide Vendor

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    Hey guys,

    I was wondering what some of you cook in your Mors pots? I've been wanting to give a go at chili or beef stew my next trip, but not sure of the quantity needed to cook in the pot.

    Boiling water and cooking noodles is great, but I want to step it up a notch.

    It would be great to hear some suggestions and or recipes you guys have for the 1.8 pot specifically.

    thanks!
     
  2. Prof

    Prof Guide Bushclass II

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    The Mors pot is a great piece of gear, and nearly all my camping partners have one except me!

    The 1.8 liter one is a good size for cooking for 2 or maybe three guys, depending on how hungry they are. Here's a quick idea to get things rolling:

    Mors Pot Beef Stew

    1/2 pound cubed stew beef
    2 medium potatoes, diced
    2 medium carrots, thinly sliced like coins
    1 packet of onion soup mix (says it makes 4 cups)
    2 Tablespoons of flour

    Put beef in pot, and add the soup mix. Add water to cover, and hang over fire until it boils. Adjust location for a slow steady boil, adding water as needed. While the meat is cooking, peel and dice the potatoes and carrots. Add the vegetables, and add water up to the rivets. Get the pot back over high heat to boil, and again move aside to simmer until vegetables are done. They should be soft when poked with a sharpened stick. Now mix the flour with a little water to make a thick liquid. Pour it slowly into the pot while stirring with your stick. Let it cook about another minute or two until broth thickens, and serve with some bannock or skillet biscuits. If another guy has a Mors pot, make cowboy coffee in it!

    This stew tastes best after a hike through the woods, while sitting on a stump, far from the sounds of civilization.

    Here's my video with a few variations: I used a tin can instead of a Mors pot, and I had cooked the meat and sliced the carrots before heading to the woods. \

    [video=youtube;zjWOKutbGQk]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zjWOKutbGQk[/video]
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2013
  3. avenger

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    This sounds yummy! Thanks for sharing.
     
  4. vakman

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    I've got one:

    1.5 cups barley
    1 chopped carrot
    1/2 chopped onion
    1/2lb chopped bacon
    1 chopped celery
    salt, pepper, boullion cube, and a dash-o-whiskey

    Really with stews, just add a bunch of stuff. It's easy to tell if it needs more meat, veg, or grain relative to the other ingredients.

    Barley is the ideal camp grain. No mess like with flour, and can be made into both a convincing dinner and breakfast (eg with cinnamon and sugar). It's very filling (expands a lot when cooking).
     
  5. Road King

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    Excellent video and use of materials! The food looked great!
     
  6. BreakPapaLizard

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    Where would be a good place to get barley? Doesn't sound like something I'd find on the flour aisle at work (wal-mart) though I could be wrong.
     
  7. Spork

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    Look where they keep the dried beans, split peas and lentils.
     
  8. Mudman

    Mudman Guide Vendor

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    Thanks I'll have to give it a try TheProfessor! I may do a practice cook this weekend, as I'm planning to do some fishing.

    Vakman- That sounds pretty good too! Never thought about barely that way.
     
  9. Prof

    Prof Guide Bushclass II

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    This site: The Joy of Field Rations...

    http://joyoffieldrations.blogspot.com/search/label/goulash

    has been referenced here before, but this segment is about what you're looking for! European military mess kits seemed to be more about stewing and boiling, and their recipes would work great for your Mors pot. This one is for "goulash" which I would call beef and gravy. This basic recipe could be served over boiled or instant mashed potatoes, noodles, or rice. It could be turned into stew by adding the potatoes and carrots. Since it is from"scratch," you can control the flavor, and sodium content.

    Apparently groups of 4 or 5 guys would cook together using their mess kits, so one pot could cook the meat, another the potatoes, another the coffee, and so on.

    A few months ago, I bought a little cookbook at an antique shop that took this very idea a step further: they called it "Make-ahead beef," which was just the beef and gravy goulash prepared and then frozen. You could freeze the mixture in shapes that would drop into your pot at camp. That way, several meals could be prepared from the basic meat and gravy base, and it would be quicker than waiting for an hour for the meat to get tender.

    Kochgeschirr Cooking 1.jpg
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2013
  10. silhouette

    silhouette Scout

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    Awesome thread.
    I do have one question, I just picked up a Mors pot and I was curious do yall carry a plate or bowl with your pot or just eat strait out of the pot?
     
  11. Boot1990

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    I usually either eat out of the pot or my space saver cup. for me it depends on what has been cooked, how many ive cooked for, and how badly I want coffee also! lol i dont normally carry a plate seeing as most of what I cook in the woods is either to be eaten out of a bowl or cup, or it is usually meat of some sort that i can just eat off of a stick or plate i make from a log
     
  12. x2501

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    recipes

    Put some water, a handful of oven dehydrated ground beef, turkey or tuna, a handful of dried mixed veggies into pot Bring to a boil, throw 1 or two packs of Ramen noodles into the pot and a pack of gravy mix (if you don't use the spice pack) stir, let sit for a couple minutes serve. Takes some home prep but very easy and lightweight.
     
  13. Prof

    Prof Guide Bushclass II

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    I usually carry a bowl or eat out of a cup. If I eat stew out of the cup, I rinse it out and then drink tea or coffee last.

    Idahoan instant mashed potatoes come in a nice little bowl now. I am buying the 'taters that way and saving the bowls. They are very light, and they fit into a pot perfectly. Hormel "Compleat" meals come in a nice little oval bowl that might drop into a Mors pot, although I haven't tried it yet.

    I have some stainless steel bowls from a Coleman set that fit fine in a Mors pot. I gave one to bushbumming29 at our last camp that dropped into his Mors pot. A cup drops into the bowl. Both bowl and cup have folding handles. I got some other little GSI bowls that are the size to drop into a Mors pot. Cups would drop into them and make a nice set.

    I have some little melmac plates that drop in the big kettle of my cook kit and ride under my coffee pot; but they seem to see more use as spoon rests or sandwich plates. My bowls and cups get more use.

    Add a few packages of instant soup and some tea bags, and you have a cooking pot, and eating/drinking combination and some food and drink all in one package. A dish towel or some paper towels keep things from rattling, and help with clean-up at camp.

    [video=youtube;dPhlxJCZe8I]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dPhlxJCZe8I[/video]

    Here's the most recent Slumdog outing with two Mors pots in use:

    [video=youtube;fUSXEzL0RBc]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fUSXEzL0RBc[/video]
     
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2013
  14. Prof

    Prof Guide Bushclass II

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    30-Minute Stew

    I was just reading onewiththewild's thread with the link to a lot of Boy Scout recipes...

    http://bushcraftusa.com/forum/showthread.php/129003-boy-scout-camp-food-ideas

    ...and found one called 30-Minute Stew. I tried it out today at home, and made some modifications so it would fit in a 1.8 liter Mors pot. Here's what I came up with:

    1/2 lb ground beef, browned OR 1 pouch of Libby's Seasoned Beef Crumbles
    1 medium potato, diced
    1 Tbsp minced onion
    1 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes
    1 small can of green beans ( 8 oz or 14.5 oz)
    1 tsp beef boullon soup base
    2 Tbsp Worchester sauce OR 2 packets of soy sauce from a previous Chinese carry-out

    Add all ingredients to Mors pot, add some water "to the rivets," and bring to a boil over a campfire. Adjust location over fire to maintain a good simmer for 30 minutes or until potatoes are done.

    Serve two or three hungry campers with some snack crackers and cheese.
     
  15. Haggis

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    In a way, I feel cheated. My "Mors"Bush Pot has only and will only ever have water boiled in it. These days I'm of a mind that every mess kit consists of two pots: one for cooking/eating in, and one for carrying or boiling water in. Still though, keep the recipes coming. I might be tempted to try one in my other pots?
     
  16. Moe M.

    Moe M. Supporter Supporter

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    Just out of curiosity, why don't you use your Mor's pot for anything other than boiling water, I have the 1.1 liter Mor's Bush Pot for solo cooking and it works wounderfully for just about anything someone would cook in a pot ?
    I try to travel as light as I can without being anal about it, lately I've been using just a pot and a Stainless water bottle, boil in the bottle for clean water, or hot drink and cook in the pot, I used to carry a USGI set up, and then a MSR stowaway pot and their kettle, but I find the mor's to be a great little cook pot and the SS water bottle does double duty for carrying water and boiling.
     
  17. Haggis

    Haggis Supporter Supporter

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    Even at home I have pots for cooking food and pots only used for boiling water. I have the 1.8L bush pot, and don't really "cook" in the bush anyway, so a small pan does all I need.
     
  18. Moe M.

    Moe M. Supporter Supporter

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    I have a recipe that's pretty close to your's David, I buy an extra pound of ground beef when I'm fixing to make a meatloaf or burgers, while I'm prepping the meat I roll little teaspoon sized meatballs with the extra pound of ground beef, then I freeze them on a cookie sheat in the freezer, when frozen I transfer the meatballs into small size freezer bags (sandwich bag size) and keep them in the freezer until needed.
    When I'm going out for a day hike or over nighter I wrap a bag of the meatballs in foil and put them in a covered plastic container (deli type) and into my pack, when it's time for the stew I get the water boiling, and a couple of beef boullion cubes to the water, then some fresh or dried veggies, when the veggies are about half done I add a can of diced tomatoes, my seasonings, the meatballs and a quarter cup of rice and the same of some small pasta.
    It makes a light but filling and delishious stew/soup, the meatballs add a great testure to the meal, as does the rice and pasta over the ground beef and potatoes.

    * note- I don't care for minute rice, I use regular long grain rice, but I do wash the starch off and let it drain before adding it to the pot, and I make my little meatballs with a good grade of ground chuck with 85% beef to 15% fat content, it adds a lot of flavor without adding too much fat to the soup, also, if you like to add a little flavor kick to your soup, try adding a pinch or two of Old Bay seasoning. :32:
     
  19. Prof

    Prof Guide Bushclass II

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    Make-ahead meat balls can be the beginning of many great camp meals. I picked up a little cook book at a second-hand store a while back with several ideas that hardly need a "recipe" as such.

    Some more ideas:

    Spaghetti and meat balls
    Meat ball sandwiches...add some pasta sauce of your choice
    Meat balls in gravy...grab a package of beef gravy mix at the store and serve over Idahoan mashed potatoes
    Meat balls and noodles...use choice of noodles and a beef gravy or broth mix.
    Add meat balls to any Knorr side of you choice to turn it into a one-pot meal

    When I am limited on time, I sometimes buy frozen meat balls at the store. The great thing is being able to count out a few and defrost just what I need for a camp meal.
     
  20. Moe M.

    Moe M. Supporter Supporter

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    Made ahead meatballs are great, I freeze some uncooked and some cooked, for the soup recipe the uncooked is better as it adds to the flavor of the broth, but cooked meatballs will last longer, I've kept frozen cooked meatballs up to 2-1/2 days un refrigerated as long as they were frozen when packed, they probably go longer, but they don't last long enough to find out. :4:
    I like meatballs in gravy over pasta, rice, even over bread, if you use canned or jared gravy (chicken or beef), adding a bit of worcestershire sauce will give it a sweedish meatball taste, especially good over instant or fresh mashed spuds.
    I also love Knorr's pasta sides, they're great without any additions at all, It's hard to find dried meals that are easily prepared and stand alone without the need to dress them up and actually taste good. :dblthumb:

    I've seen the frozen meatballs at the super market, Call me paranoid, but I don't trust what they put in them, funny story, I had a close friend who was a REM in Vietnam, he was the type of guy that would eat just about anything, but he wouldn't touch oriental food at all, when I asked him why, he just smiled and said "they hide stuff in there, enough said".
    I have used other prepared frozen meats like fish, chicken, and beef, so I'm probably being silly, I may give them a try sometime.
     
  21. Moe M.

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    Better late than never. :19:

    I have the smaller 1.1 (5 cup) mor's pot and find it just right for solo cooking and just about enough for two people with the addition of a side of bannock or bread, I usually keep some food packets, cup of soup, instant oatmeal, and Hot chocolate in a plastic bag in my pot, I do have a small stainless steel bowl that fits into it that I picked up at Pet-Smart but rarely use it.
    What I have found handier is a vintage tin pie plate, it's light, packs better than a bowl in your pack, two of them nest quite well and don't take any more room than one, the sides are deep enough to use as a plate yet handles stews very well, if you carry two you can put them together to form a small oven for baking biscuits, or cover one with the other to keep your food warm while you fix your coffee or tea.
    They can be found in several sizes, I have a half dozen, two in each size from 4" ~ 9" in dia., I found mine at flea markets, junk shops, and thrift shops, usually for .25 or .50 cents each, if you clean them up good and coat them as you would a cast iron pan (a light coat of mineral oil and 10 minutes in a 375* oven they won't rust up on you and will be easy to keep clean, and in a pinch you can use them as a frying pan or skillet.
    If I need a real bowl for soup or cereal I just use my glasier cup.
     
  22. Prof

    Prof Guide Bushclass II

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    I have a couple of the older coffee pots that are like Mors pots, but have a "real" spout with strainer holes. The top of the pot has a shoulder, so it is a great hot water boiler and coffee pot, but a pretty poor bush pot for other foods. I usually just heat water in it and make instant coffee, hot chocolate or other instant hot drink.

    I use my Mors pot more as a cooking pot, since I already have the coffee pot. At a fixed camp, I may take both so I always have a pot of hot water.
     
  23. Mudman

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    Of any piece of outdoor gear I own, the Mors Pot has proven to be my favorite. Even more so than any knife, Axe, pack, tarp, whatever.

    Can't tell you how many times I've use the lid as a plate. The little handle tab thing on the lid slip over my finger, no more wind gusts throw a plate out of my hands!

    Still haven't tried any roast in it yet- as I haven't camped in a long time. Should practice at home though.
     
  24. crewhead05

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  25. Prof

    Prof Guide Bushclass II

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    Mors Pot Spaghetti

    Here's a fast meal for about 3 guys using a 1.8 liter Mors pot.

    6 oz of angel hair spaghetti...about 1/3 of a 1-pound box; not too critical
    1 6-oz pouch of Libby's Seasoned Beef Crumbles
    1 24-oz jar of pasta sauce
    8 oz of water

    Break spaghetti into shorter pieces, drop in Mors pot. Add meat and sauce. Rinse jar with water, then pour it in, too.

    Heat over high heat until pot begins to boil. Move to lower heat; maintain gentle simmer. Stir often so food doesn't stick. Cook until spaghetti is soft, about 10 to 12 minutes after boil.

    Serve with bannock or French bread and a salad...maybe of dandelion leaves or lamb's quarter.
     
  26. Mudman

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    I will try this at home this weekend. Haven't done any camping in a while.

    Never tried cooking everything at once, usually do the noodles first.
     
  27. Prof

    Prof Guide Bushclass II

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    Yeah, me too. This works pretty well when you only have the one pot, though.
     
  28. Moe M.

    Moe M. Supporter Supporter

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    I've always done the pasta first also, I prefer the string spaghetti also but usually use Penne pasta (less trouble) when camping, when adding water to the mix and cooking it all at once does it come out soupy or does the starch in the pasta thicken the sauce up enough ?
     
  29. grumpa

    grumpa Banned Member Banned

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    grumpa

    Some the frozen meat balls are very good.Like you say take out what you need and but the rest back in the freezer.I use the frozen sausage patties the same way.
     
  30. Prof

    Prof Guide Bushclass II

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    The spaghetti noodles took up the water and some of the liquid from the sauce, so the sauce was thick or "about right" in the proportions I cited. Like many other things, there is no wrong way if you produce an edible product at the end.

    Penne is good; I've used small shells or small elbow macaroni, or small rings (like spaghetti-Os) because they cook fast.
     
  31. POGEYBAIT

    POGEYBAIT Scout

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    Marked for future sustenance.
     
  32. yourboringfriend

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    + 1 for this thread, great idea. I've marked this one as well. Thank you for this!
     
  33. Call_to_arms

    Call_to_arms Scout

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    [video=youtube_share;n8roV0HVcaU]http://youtu.be/n8roV0HVcaU[/video]
    This is an epic stew I cooked this past spring, it spent 3 days over the fire. It started out with a set ingredient list and later included whatever wasn't bolted down. I didnt get any complaints and none of it went to waste.
     
  34. Swampdog

    Swampdog Supporter Supporter

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    OK guys, keep in mind the KISS principal:

    1 - 15 oz. can of Hormel Chili

    1 - 16 oz. can of Bush's Baked Beans

    1 lb. - ground venison (or wild hog, or ground beef) browned in skillet

    1 - diced onion

    1 - 4 oz. can of mushrooms

    Add you own seasoning for flavor if needed; wash down with beer.

    Enjoy!
     
  35. Prof

    Prof Guide Bushclass II

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    Here's today's lunch in the woods with my Mors pot: Easy Cheesy Stew. Dice, then boil 2 medium potatoes, drain some water, and leave some. Add in a small can of carrots and two Spam singles. Add a can of Campbell's Cheddar Cheese Soup. Heat back to boiling and serve!
     

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  36. Easy_rider75

    Easy_rider75 Supporter Supporter

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    Ah damn that sounds good man. Being as getting cool now and I'm gettig a new mors pot guess I know what I'm making. Might change up a couple things.
     
  37. Prof

    Prof Guide Bushclass II

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    Sitting beside my chair is my copy of The Outdoor Cook's Bible written in 1963. The glue dried out, and nearly all the pages are falling out. The author makes an important statement before the recipe section: recipes are not hard and fast rules; they merely record how certain people did it. We all add things we like, leave out things we don't and season to our varying tastes!
     
  38. Haggis

    Haggis Supporter Supporter

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    Had a run at you recipe this evening, using venison from last year's buck. Herself and our 18-year old Granddaughter really liked it. Pretty cool, and easy enough this old Army cook could sort it out.
     
  39. Easy_rider75

    Easy_rider75 Supporter Supporter

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    Agreed that's what I love about cooking it's way more flexible than baking is. Camp cooking even better
     
  40. Moe M.

    Moe M. Supporter Supporter

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    Hey David, thanks for bringing back this thread, it's got a lot of good stuff in it starting with the Mors Pot, of course any good pot will do as well, it's really what one does with his/her favorite pot that counts.
    I may have posted this in another thread some where in this section, I've been making what I call Oriental Rice for several years and it's become a favorite, I'm not very good at writing specific recipes because I do most of my cooking by eye when it comes to ingredients, so anyone attempting to make it will have to play with it to get it to their taste.

    I start out by rinsing the "rice flour" off one cup of rice until the water runs clear, (what I'm talking about is the white powder residue left on the rice after it's processed, it's starchy and tends to make the rice pasty if not washed off before cooking), I don't like minute rice, but if you use it you don't have to do this step, also I cook my rice for 20 minutes, so if you are using minute or instant rice you'll have to follow the instructions on the package for cooking times.
    After washing the rice and while it's draining I get 1-3/4 cups of water in my pot, add salt, black pepper, a level teaspoon of granulated chicken bullion, a tablespoon of Soy Sauce, and 2 teaspoons of Worstershire Sauce, then I get my veggies ready, 1/2 of a medium yellow onion chopped or sliced, about a quarter cup of carrots cut into tiny sticks, about a quarter cup of red bell peppers, and a quarter cup of thin sliced celery.
    I also cut up about a quarter cup of original Spam into small bite sized pieces and set that aside (a one slice foil packed Spam works).

    When my water mixture comes to a boil I add a tablespoon of butter or oil, and then my rice, I let it come back to a simmer, cover, and cook for about 20 minutes, when the rice is tender and the liquid absorbed I remove the pot from the heat, I add my Spam pieces, stir it in while fluffing the rice a bit, then put the lid back on the pot and let it stand for about 10 minutes to let it cool a little and absorb some of the Spam flavor into the rice, then serve.

    It makes a tasty and filling one pot meal for two people or for one really hungry camper, like all recipes it sounds like more work when reading it than it is when making it, and it's one that lends itself to change to suit individual taste, I should add that I use a 1.1 5 cup Mors Bush Pot, those with bigger pots can increase the recipe to suit their needs, also I usually hang my pot over the fire by the bail so scorching the rice towards the end of the cooking time is not a problem, if you are cooking directly over the fire or coals, you may need to pay more attention to regulating your heat when cooking any rice or similar food.
     
  41. teb_atoz

    teb_atoz Guide Bushclass I

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    Stew is what ever you have on hand goes in the pot. It is not rocket science. I made a nice meal out of Knorr's Cheese Brocclie rice and a can of chicken. But I have also made most nay ting you can think of. For me camping is a time to relax and cook.
     
  42. Hawk35

    Hawk35 Tinder Gatherer

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    Just got a mors 1.8 this week. Thanks for starting this thread Mudman.
     
  43. Paul Foreman

    Paul Foreman Supporter Supporter

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    one pack of Knorr red beans and rice, as much water as the package says, and your meat of choice; i used one of those little flat cans of chicken. delicious. the Knorr items are hearty and stinking good.
     
  44. MohaveGreen

    MohaveGreen Guide

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  45. Easy_rider75

    Easy_rider75 Supporter Supporter

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    Your last line has always been my thought. It ain't fast good cookin with me. Speed isn't the point.

    Just got a 1.8 liter and I'm thinking stew now but be in the backyard when carving zero time to get out.
     
  46. Mudman

    Mudman Guide Vendor

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    Thanks for keeping this thread alive guys, please keep it going. I want to get out more next year and could use some great recipes. :39:
     
  47. Prof

    Prof Guide Bushclass II

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    I subscribed to this thread so I can revisit it when I am low on ideas. Often, I use my Mors pot inside on the range, or on the porch with a gas or alcohol stove to try various recipes. I stock ingredients for the best ones so I am ready to go with an hour's notice of an outing!
     
  48. Hawk35

    Hawk35 Tinder Gatherer

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    O.K. so far I have boiled water for coffee,boiled eggs,heated up some chicken and rice soup from the Schwan's man, used my Emberlit stove with a Trangia burner. Have not used it over a fire yet due to Burn Ban. So far I really like it.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2015

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