Nailed

Discussion in 'Preparedness' started by Bravo Tango, Aug 2, 2011.

  1. Bravo Tango

    Bravo Tango Scout

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    I haven't seen any posting on this so I thought I would throw it out there. I keep hearing what items people would stockpile for emergencies and what items they pack for survival. But one thing that I haven't read on people keeping around is a box or two of nails. I keep a handful in my Go-to-bag and at least a couple of boxes of various sizes in the garage. For bushcraft I can see a hundred different ways that a simple nail could be utilized, and for around the home they could be priceless in a critical time or after a natural disaster. With all the ways to utilize even a single nail I find it hard to believe that no one has brought them up yet. ( but I only checked the search function so I could be wrong).

    Was just wondering who else and how some of you utilize nails other than everyday day construction?
     
  2. Chert

    Chert Guide

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    Improvised blowgun projectile, use for an AWL, knapping, spear point, small nails bent for fish hook
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2011
  3. Scooter

    Scooter Scout

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    Nails were so valuable in the past that when pioneers moved they often burned down their buildings and took the nails with them.
     
  4. Adahy

    Adahy Kuksaholic

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    I was wondering this the other day when I found these in an abandoned barn
     

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  5. Sgt. Mac

    Sgt. Mac Elder Staff Member Administrator Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II Bushclass Instructor

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    Thats a good idea
     
  6. mwd

    mwd Supporter Supporter

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    I've never thought about that but.....You're right.
     
  7. Gryphonblade

    Gryphonblade Guide

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    Ya know, I never considered that, but it's a great idea. Some screws too. And a couple rolls of bailing wire.
     
  8. Taliesin

    Taliesin Guide

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    They also make good trading stock if it should come to that.
     
  9. Dearborn

    Dearborn Scout Deceased

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    Square Nails

    I've been reading indications for a number of years that manufactured round nails generally date from 1890 onward. I may eat my words after a modest Google search, but I've been operating on the premise for a while.

    Good suggestion on the nails, and I would also add different lengths of the drywall screws. That aggressive thread holds tight!
     
  10. Otony

    Otony Scout

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    If you are stocking the house for long term "preparedness" another good idea would be a roll of Visquin (?sp) and/or Tyvek. Plus a couple of sheets of plywood and a few 2x4s.

    Never know when you might have to replace a broken window in time of need, eh?
     
  11. x39

    x39 Guide

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    Another good resource for survival in place is a 55 gallon drum and the means to cut it. The steel used in making them is very user friendly for cutting, bending, and forming.
     
  12. Seeker

    Seeker Woods Bum Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    i carry a couple small finishing nails in one of my repair kits (3, 4, and 6). i imagine using them where a small pin would be used to hold something together (eyeglass hinge, gun part, fishing reel part, etc.)
     
  13. Trekon86

    Trekon86 Guest

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    Awls, ice picks/awls, way to hold your waterstones on a log for camp sharpening tasks, shelter building, home repairs, big ones (steel spikes) can be made into DIY leather stamps using needle files...

    We have a bucket or two somewheres from previous roofing and building projects...and moar elsewhere.
    PMZ
     
  14. Trekon86

    Trekon86 Guest

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    Modern nails are made of mild steel which mimics soft iron, hence with a little cutting and hammering you can use them as rivets.

    PMZ
     
  15. Jonesyjo

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    i remember reading about old blacksmith's number one produced item was the nail. i agree those little buggers are like woodworking duct tape.
     
  16. Chester Proudfoot

    Chester Proudfoot Tracker

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    and a hammer;)
     
  17. Phaedrus

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    Very true. Yet you must also remember that back in those days nails were hand made by a smith, one at a time. Modern nails are extruded wire. So whereas a nail is dirt cheap and easy to make now, they were rarer and difficult to come by then. And screws were even more expensive back before the casting techniques and power lathes of today.

    Still I agree that nails are something that one should add to long term prep if you expect to be in a SHTF/EOTWAWKI situation. Heck, even having nails to board up windows in advance of a storm or hurricane is a great idea.
     
  18. LukeDeBee

    LukeDeBee Scout

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    I've had similar ideas. Immediate: nails, maybe screws. Long term: I'm glad I have my grandpa's brace and bit. I am slowly building up a supply of a few select bit sizes. Learn the skill of square pegs in round holes incase there is no metal.

    Large buildings and barns have been build with brace, bits and wooden pegs.
    The Amish still build this way.

    Luke DeBee
     
  19. alukban

    alukban Guide

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    Nessmuk used nails as part of his gear to put up his shanties :dblthumb:
     
  20. LukeDeBee

    LukeDeBee Scout

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    MODERATORS: This may be considered off topic. IF you want to deleate or repost this OK with me...

    Posted in the spirit of preparedness skills and examples of what can be done ...

    Here are a few pictures of what can be done with brace and bit. I helped my neighbor Dan the Man build his Man Hut in the alley.

    At times he used power tools, there is a metal roof etc. but he also used hand tools at times just to prove to himself that he had the skill and the project could be done by hand it needed.

    I was a go-fer and an extra pair of hands, plus I helped set the frams and the rafters, so don't think I really built this. I gained alot just by being around and helping.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    It was the neighborhood hang out for the guys to play pingpong and to BS by the fire. Great winter hang out. Great and genrous friend. Learned alot too.

    By the way most of the matrerials in the Man Hut were found, begged or bartered. You can see that each beam was hand cut or shaped with a chain saw. No dimensional lumber in the whole place. Not a perfectly square corner either. Dan kept saying, " It only has to be close..." Some how he made it work. I could always see this shed in a quiet spot in the woods....

    Luke DeBee
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2011
  21. harvey_birdman

    harvey_birdman Scout

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    Man that place looks great!

    I remember seeing a tread on here a while back about pounding nails into small blades. It looked cool and very useful.
     
  22. Quill

    Quill Scout

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    I keep plenty of nails on hand, but use screws more often. Roofing nails are great item along with rolled roofing.
     
  23. karlsefni01

    karlsefni01 Guide

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    Luke that is a great looking timberframe building. I'll pm you and pick your brain for some ideas about it later.

    And yes, nails are really handy to have around for certain types of projects. Salvaging old nails is a good idea as well, especially if you are a prepper
     
  24. quidditchfan

    quidditchfan Scout

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    Good ideas all thank you Bravo Tango for making me think.
     
  25. Mattnu

    Mattnu Guide

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    I remember seeing a lot of small, and some not so small, timber frame building built when I was in Northern Japan in the 80's. Assembled with wooden pins and wedges too. My freind explained that one of the reasons they used the "old" tech (with tin roofs and siding) was because the frames would flex and give during an earthquake instead of shattering. It appears they also float during a Tsunami.
     
  26. Mattnu

    Mattnu Guide

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    Half a dozen nails in a kit can be useful. With a scotch-eye auger you can make a trap for racoons or monkeys using three of the nails and a hole in a log.
     
  27. eurrider

    eurrider Scout

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    like Mattnu said did that as a kid years ago when i was trapping for furs and to feed mt coon dogs
     
  28. hughhaff

    hughhaff Scout

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    I keep the "stick" nails used in pneumatic framing nail guns that are collated with paper. This way I can throw 3 or 4 sticks in my BOB and are more organized and at hand than a handfull of nails would be. Being a carpenter I'm more exposed to the many different types of fasteners out there and would highly recommend everyone getting some.
     
  29. Old Philosopher

    Old Philosopher Banned Member Banned

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    Good thread!
    Part of my "preps" are boxes of 5, 10 and 16 dwt nails, along with a few spikes. I dearly love my drill-driver, and using screws, but there may be a day when it has to be replaced by a hammer. ;)
     
  30. forge1

    forge1 Scout

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    Nope...

    The taper is uniform, the ends are squared, the rosettes are all the same and the length is perfect. They are machine made, not hand forged........Ross:1:
     
  31. Old Philosopher

    Old Philosopher Banned Member Banned

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    I believe those are horseshoe nails.

    [​IMG]
     
  32. Malamute

    Malamute Guide

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    I don't believe they are horseshoe nails, they are more pointy and thin on the end, and the heads are offcenter to the side. Older nails were square tho. I've heard that square nails hold better than round, but I don't know if that's true.

    Those in the pic above arent all that even, they may be handmade nails, tho they may have been done by someone that was very good. I've seen modern made door hardware that looked like it was made by a beginner, when most of the old iron work I've seen looked pretty darn good, even and fairly consistant. The tried to do nice work, not make them look crude, like some modern iron workers do.

    Some concrete nails were square not too long ago, but I havent seen any squares recently, just fluted round,
     
  33. Old Philosopher

    Old Philosopher Banned Member Banned

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    Yeah, I was going by the apparent rectangular heads on the nails in the pictures. Not knowing how long they were made it a guess on my part. Some in the picture looked like they were thicker in the middle, too.
     
  34. Malamute

    Malamute Guide

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    The thicker in the middle part, and the uneven taper leading to the heads is what made me think they are handmade regular nails.
     
  35. Trekon86

    Trekon86 Guest

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    Those look handmade to me.

    The "newer" square headed nails/flat ones are much more "perfect" lol...

    PMZ
     
  36. Malamute

    Malamute Guide

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    An old friend, now passed on, had found a half keg of square nails somewhere. I wish I had traded him out of them, I'd like to use them in places that show for my cabin addition.
     
  37. Trekon86

    Trekon86 Guest

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    Shoulda gone to his auction...lmao!

    PMZ
     
  38. Malamute

    Malamute Guide

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    They didnt sell his personal stuff. He had his dads forge also. I wanted to deal with him for the forge, but he didnt want to let go of it since it was his dad's. Wonder if any of the kids have any interest in that stuff?
     
  39. Trekon86

    Trekon86 Guest

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    They probably turned right around and sold it...course, mebbe not. There's lotsa young fellas on here who like that kinda thing...

    PMZ
     
  40. Old Philosopher

    Old Philosopher Banned Member Banned

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    Worth a followup, if you know how to reach them. Sometimes that stuff just sits around because finding a buyer is more hassle than they want.
     
  41. Malamute

    Malamute Guide

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    I don't think they did anything with much of his stuff, his widow is still in the house. I know them pretty well, but don't get over to that area much any more.
     
  42. BillyByrd

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    I keep 8 to 12 gutter spikes in my pack & in all my vehicles (to use as tent pegs and 4 of em make a really great cook stove - drove evenly into the ground around a small fire). I also keep appx. 40 lbs of 16 penny nails out in the shop (just for general needs).
     
  43. Jon Foster

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    Our house is a junkyard (from my perspective). We have a bit of everything if you look hard enough...

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  44. ccwaters

    ccwaters Scout

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    Add some wire and dry wall screws, I especially like the dry wall screws for ease in starting, and the aggressive threading.
     
  45. akabu

    akabu Supporter Supporter

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    always have few box,s of different types in the house and dry wall screws of different sizes. I keep some in the car and in my PSK and in my knife sheath pocket. thier's a pic of me putting one on a tree for my eating gear.
     
  46. The Dude

    The Dude Scout Bushclass I

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    I would add glue to that growing list...
     
  47. Looker

    Looker Guide

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    I just bought a forge, and looked up a local blacksmithing guild. I'm signed up for a class later this winter!:dblthumb:

    I think that nails are a great idea. However, I think that cut concrete nails are a better choice. They are made of harder and better steel.

    I don't necessarily buy into everything this guy suggests, but he does have some creative uses for nails:
    http://www.survivaloutdoorskills.com/

    Good thread, thanks!

    Looker
     
  48. doodle lee squat

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    Going back to emergency survival and preparedness, I know that builders plastic sheeting and duct tape have been mentioned. It is important to note that those can be used to stop most infiltration of outside air into your house should you need to do that. doodle lee
     
  49. randyt

    randyt Guide

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    Interesting thread fellas. I keep a few five gallon buckets of 8's, 10's and 16's in the barn. Also I have a small block of steel, maybe four inches square and a couple inches thick. I use this block for straightening bent nails. I keep roofing nails and sheet metal roofing screws handy too.

    for screws I've went to deck screws. Deck screws are coated to take the weather and have a square drive rather than the phillips drive. I keep several pounds of these screws handy as well.

    It seems I always fixing, patching up or building something and it's convenient to have a stock of supplies in the barn.
     
  50. Malamute

    Malamute Guide

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    Regarding screws, the square drives are much better than philips, but I've gone to torx (star drive) screws for nearly all of my use. They are very aggresive, have a cutting groove at the tip, and almost never slip when driving them. First time I saw them in use, a friend was standing on the top of a 6' ladder reaching as high as he could, and shooting a screw sideways with a drill one handed. It didn't slip in the least. I instantly noticed and asked what he was using. Not easy to drive by hand, but amazing when used with a screw gun. I buy them by the 40 lb (or whatever they come in) from 2" to 6". I have no idea how many boxes of 3"ers I've gone thru in building cabins and houses.
     

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