Natural v. Forced Patina

Discussion in 'General Bushcraft Discussion' started by Marcos, Jan 25, 2012.

  1. Marcos

    Marcos Tracker

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    Ok guys, I just recieved my Mora 840mg in the mail and have to say extremely pleased with it. Got it from Ragweed Forge and must say the service was excellent.

    Now being that I am borderline OC'D when it comes to taking care of my gear I am trying to figure out if there is a major difference in forced or natural patina's? Is one better than the other? I've read some of the posts here and watched alot of the youtube stuff and not sure which way to go.

    So can I get ya'lls opinions, and whats best way to do a forced one if I go that route.
     
  2. illtemper

    illtemper Tracker

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    I prefer a natural patina, gives it an "earned" character. I've made a few knives that I used mustard to make designs or patterns and then soaked it in vinegar or gun bluing,really like the gun bluing. The patina on a high carbon blade is actually just oxidation,which ironically,helps protect it from rust. I usually just keep mine oiled and let it be what it'll be...Jon
     
  3. Easy_rider75

    Easy_rider75 Supporter Supporter

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    I tossed around the idea of a forced even tried a test section on the blade eh I'd rather let it age naturally seems better to me
     
  4. Zig

    Zig Guide

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    Stick it in an apple or a potato for a night or two. It doesn't force as much of a patina as the vinegar or mustard approach. It's more like giving the patina a head start. I heard somewhere that this is what the old timers used to do... can't remember where I heard it though.

    After that I just strop it, oil it, and occasionally take it to the stone.
     
  5. econnofoot

    econnofoot Guest

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    Personally I believe in natural patina. I do admit to stripping the black off a Condor though but haven't patina d it.
     
  6. Woods Walker

    Woods Walker Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    I don't think there is anything wrong with a forced patina. In the end they will all look about the same anyways.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. madmax

    madmax Bushmaster

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    I wait, I get rust. I force it immediately. Nobody's knocked the look yet.
     
  8. kgd

    kgd Dr. Fishguts Bushclass I

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    Nobody will cite the "look of the patina" as the reason they are calling your mora ugly :D :D :D :D Its a using knife that works.
     
  9. BushBum

    BushBum Guide

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    my moras see allot of use... they all look like hell.. they all can shave with ease. and I haven;t had one disintegrate on account of corrosion.. I say use it let it get it;s own look.. use it allot and strop regularly and the edge will allways shine like new.
     
  10. Niflreika

    Niflreika Guide

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    I go against the flow. If I get a carbon blade that's all shiny, I force a patina, usually just soak it in lemon juice overnight, wipe it off, strop it, oil it and let it wear in from there.
     
  11. Capt. Jeff

    Capt. Jeff Guest

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    i like a forced patina. all of the above suggestions are right on, and as you can see there are many different ways to go about it. i am not a fan of the patterns that some people get when you use mustard, i prefer a more even coat, and that natural look. i use white vinegar and soak the whole blade for a few hours, or until desired color is reached.

    my first patina was done accidently. i used my new mora to cut up an apple, the next day it was very dark in the area i used. that got me started on the "patina quest" and i like the look!
     
  12. pinetree64

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    I force like others have said to prevent rust. Through use, the patina will change and look/become natural. I got an Opinel #8 and simple filled a tall, narrow jar with white vinegar. I let it go for a while. It came out a dark grey with some variation but much more consistent than when I have used mustard.
     

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