Need suggestions for bedroll carry...

Discussion in 'Packs, Bags & Pouches' started by GrandLarsony, Mar 14, 2013.

  1. GrandLarsony

    GrandLarsony Guide

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    I'm hoping to do some single-night trips without my medium Alice pack (which I can certainly carry, and do on 2-3 night trips, but I want to try to reduce my total weight for longer distances and I really like how the suspender rig carries... it's really comfortable).

    So, I've decided to use a USGI pistol belt, LC-1 "Y" suspenders, Molle waist-pack, (2) canteen pouches, grenade pouch and compass pouch. This is perfect for everything I need to carry for a long day and potentially an unplanned overnight (which would be pretty safe, but not real comfortable with just these items).

    The problem is I cannot figure out how to carry my MSS goretex bivy, green patrol bag, and 2" thermarest.

    They are assembled and ready to roll out, inflate, and go to sleep... so a bag or carrier is not really needed. BTW, I use trekking poles and plan to use the Molle waist pack straps for rain gear and an extra layer (not that the bedroll would fit there anyhow).

    Does anyone have suggestions on how to carry them along with the above rig? Horizontally? Vertically? How would they attach?

    BTW, I think it was IAWoodsman who inspired this rig (at least for me), so I want to say thanks to him here. The only shortcoming is it's hard to carry an axe, but I usually carry a saw or big chopper on my belt instead.

    Will post pics later tonight if I can. Thanks for any help.
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2013
  2. mlp2147

    mlp2147 The "retired" Gunny Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Put the green bag inside the bivvy sack and button them together. Lay them on top of the sleep pad and kind of half fold the top over itself to make it more evenly shaped. Roll it up inside of the sleep pad and strap it to the bottom of the alice pad ( you might have to use additional straps or bungee cords) using the alice webbing located there. This is how I've done mine for years. I don't have any pics of it or I'd put them up for ya. We used to just strap our sleep pad there and our old style sleeping bag on top of the pack inside the wooly pete bag.

    Hope this helps.

    Crap!

    Sorry I just saw you mentioned WITHOUT the pack. Let me think on it.... some more then.
     
  3. Prof

    Prof Guide Bushclass II

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    The older M-1956 web gear had a sleeping bag strap that went through loops on the suspenders. It held your sleeping gear horizontally above the butt pack. You could likely simulate the rig with some straps and cord. The first photo shows the sleeping gear above the butt pack; the second shows the strap by itself.

    I hope this is helpful. Here is Wiki- link that shows a diagram and describes the sleeping bag strap. It mentions the tendency of the sleeping bag's weight to pull the web belt up!

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M-1956_Load-Carrying_Equipment#Sleeping_Bag_Straps

    US_M1956_ILCE_Vietnam.jpg M 1956 Sleeping Bag Strap.jpg
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2013
  4. 1066vik

    1066vik Guide

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    this or something like the blanket carrier that's being given away elsewhere on the forum -- that could be attached to the suspenders so it would ride horizontal between kidneys and hips.
     
  5. Prof

    Prof Guide Bushclass II

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    Yes, that blanket carrier has a lot of possibilities! A couple chunks of 550 cord with Canadian jam knots could hold and compress the bag; and a couple pieces of nylon webbing over the shoulders could suspend the bag above the waist pack. The straps could come all the way down to the belt in front and attach there.

    I suspect that it would have the same effect as the M 1956 rig: it would tend to pull the belt up in front, but it would work!
     
  6. GrandLarsony

    GrandLarsony Guide

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    And THIS, folks, is why I frequent this forum. Thank you so much.


     
  7. GrandLarsony

    GrandLarsony Guide

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    Found a set on eBay -- wish me luck. I'll post up a proper gear review once I get this new kit sorted.
     
  8. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    We call them spiders, I was forced to use one; once upon a time.
    Complete POS to use on the back, save them for the truck they carry in an awkward place for balance
    Use a rucksac; in the end the security and comfort is well worth it, and don't weigh much more; if you decide you have to use one, get the newer issue made from polyester webbing, those are a tenth of the weight and stronger
     
  9. Sgt. Mac

    Sgt. Mac Elder Staff Member Administrator Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II Bushclass Instructor

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    [video=youtube;__2O5bjdPis]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=__2O5bjdPis&list=UUNrN_AVfBpwHEDdMv9b7J4g&index=54[/video]
     
  10. Prof

    Prof Guide Bushclass II

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    I agree that they are not the most comfortable when used as designed! I always liked my M-1956 rig for day hikes, and when I heard of the "spider" from my surplus vendor, I had to have one!

    It did allow the rig to extend into an over-night, and I used it that way a few times. As the earlier posts mentioned, the weight of the bag tended to pull the pistol belt up, and created a balance problem.


    I ended up getting a lot of use out of mine. The strap was a good way to keep sleeping bags rolled up, and the handle was good to grab. I rigged mine on my external frame pack so the sleeping bag was suspended from a frame member and rode just below the main compartment. The little stabilizing straps snapped around the frame, and kept the sleeping bag from shifting side-to-side.


    The 1980s were a great time for buying surplus gear! There was a huge amount of genuine GI equipment available, and it was cheap. Our local supplier ran his business out of his basement, and kept a lookout for items that would go with my M-1956 rig!


    Going to surplus stores now-a-days is a downer: much of the stuff is "military style" and is made overseas. I think the lowest point for me was picking up a belt pack and reading the label "Made in Vietnam!"
     
  11. GrandLarsony

    GrandLarsony Guide

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    Thanks Mac -- very helpful video !!!
     
  12. Prof

    Prof Guide Bushclass II

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    Sgt Mac-

    Which was is more comfortable: sleeping gear high or low? Thanks for the info on the M 1967 rig. It seems to be the successor to the M 1956, with several improvements. I have always liked surplus gear that can be adapted for bushcraft use! It all started when I was a kid, and my WWII vet dad took me on my first surplus store visit to buy a shelter half tent.

    Some things don't change: My shelter half, ( a newer one) packed on a roycroft frame sitting here beside me right now, is waiting to go donkey packing with my grandson tomorrow.
     
  13. Sgt. Mac

    Sgt. Mac Elder Staff Member Administrator Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II Bushclass Instructor

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    I prefer having the sleep system up high and the butt pack down low due to weight and size
     

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