Packing Eggs?

Discussion in 'Backpacking' started by The Dude, Oct 17, 2011.

  1. The Dude

    The Dude Scout Bushclass I

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    Alright how do you pack eggs?:confused:
     
  2. madmax

    madmax Bushmaster

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    Crack 'em open and pour 'em in Nalgene container.
     
  3. Skab

    Skab Staff Staff Member Super Moderator Vendor Bushclass I Bushclass Instructor

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    I do close to the same. Crack them and put into sandwich baggies, then put the baggies in my extra nalgene. Hell, I even cook them in the baggies, in boiling water, from time to time.
     
  4. Thehighwayman

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    +1 to what Skab said. Throw the cheese, Texas Pete, and bacon right in the baggie, shake it up to mix and into the boiling water. Perfect omelet every time
     
  5. coop52

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    Very carefully. No I use one of those plastic egg carriers then put some shavings in then small size eggs then some more shavings. The shavings seem to keep them from rattling. Or you could hard boil them, or scramble and freeze in a freezer bag. I've even boiled an omelet in a freezer bag. Hope this helps
     
  6. Dano

    Dano Banned Member Banned

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    Pretty much the same as madmax, but we used the tall, thin olive bottles. Yes they're glass, but they seemed to keep the eggs more "separate" and easier to pour out just how many you wanted.
     
  7. Arrowolf

    Arrowolf Supporter Supporter

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    Depends on how I'm traveling. If by canoe or kayak (meaning I will have cooler of some description), I pack 'em whole in a plastic carrier. If traveling by foot, I'll freeze 'em in a Nalgene bottle. They'll be thawed by the time I get ready to cook 'em the next day. If it's gonna be more than overnight, Mountain House.
     
  8. AAtkinson

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    Actually, I've found it best to keep them in their shells if they are farm fresh eggs. Brown and green shelled ggs from free range chickens are substantially harder than the white, store bought kind and a broody hen will sit on them, move them around all day and drop more eggs on top without many problems. We raise them here. If kept in the shell they can last for days too, much longer than if you break them open and put them in plastic. The shelf life is almost nil then really in comparison. I've had good luck packing them in a regular foam or paper egg crate and wrapping it with a towel or a shirt. I don't put a bunch of gear on top of it my pack though. When you are done you can toss the spent shells in the fire, and flatten the crate to pack it out. The paper crates can be shredded for tinder. Realistically, the container weather it be a glass or nalgene container or a paper egg crate is going to take up about the same amount of volume as do the yokes and whites; what's left is the shell itself which is negligible in terms of volume. I usually eat eggs every morning for the whole trip this way. To make it more packable, I sometimes take a crate and cut it in half and stack the two halves together, if I'm taking a full dozen.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2011
  9. sons of scotland

    sons of scotland Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    i like scrambled eggs, so i just scramble them up ahead of time and put them in a small thermos bottle, and when your ready to cook them, pour them in your skillet with some small junks of spam, and you got a damn good hearty breakfast.
     
  10. SIXFOOTER

    SIXFOOTER Guide

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    I use 1 of these, 3 or 4 days worth of eggs and never broke one. Thought about putting them in a nalgene but thats one more thing to clean and was a little worried about contamination
    [​IMG]
     
  11. NELABushman

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    One word... Powdered.

    Some think they're nasty, but in the woods they work.
     
  12. twyggy

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    Dehydrate those bad boys!

    In a nutshell: Scrable them, chop them up, and put them on a tray in your oven on low (110-115F) for ~12-24 hours! (May take longer or shorter depending on your oven) Don't use milk or oils while scrambling them (if they're going to be stored for any length of time). I make omlettes on a nonstick pack before choppin' them up. They're done when they're brittle and rock hard. You'll want to spice them up a bit, as they taste a little bit different when you rehydrate them.

    This solution isn't for everyone, but you can carry a LOT of eggs for a VERY small ammount of weight! The tradeoff is taste! I don't think they taste BAD, but they definitely taste different!

    They take about 15 minutes in some water on some coals to rehydrate! They will rehydrate if left for 24 hours in room temperature water, but the center of some will be a little bit crunchy! Think Mountain House, only less salty.

    I've tried hard boiling them to preserve nutrition, but apparently the egg white doesn't rehydrate well at all until you mix it in with the yoke. Go chemisty! :dblthumb:
     
  13. Ditch

    Ditch Tracker

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    If you take store bought eggs that have been refridgerated, how long do you think they will stay good for?
     
  14. AAtkinson

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    Not as long as fresh ones. The eggs from the store are usually a week old anyways when you buy them. But they would probably be okay for a few days. I know everyone is a fan of cracking the shells and putting them in a separate container, but the shell itself is one of the most amazing and best containers for longer shelf life you could hope for. A farm fresh egg can last for days kept this way. Hens will lay one at a time naturally and won't sit on them to brood until they get a good clutch full. So, at 14 hours of daylight needed per egg, for eight eggs you are looking at many days outside in a nest at ambient air temperature and they are still viable at that point. Once you take them out of the shell they degrade rapidly, in terms of nutrients and flavor, and they draw and grow bacteria like crazy. The shell with the mucus coating left behind from the laying acts as a bacterial barrier to keep the egg inside intact. So my motto is "Dont Crack Em, Just Pack Em." :D
     
  15. pat_t

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    Large mouth plastic jar, like the pre-sweetend Kool-Aid jars. Fill with two or three eggs and corn meal. If you get them full, nothing shifts and they don't crack open. I can always use the corn meal for cooking.

    pat
     
  16. Leif

    Leif Staff Staff Member Super Moderator Vendor Bushclass I Bushclass Instructor

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    I use the 6 egg carrier of this type. Works great. Never broke an egg.
     
  17. Ahnkochee

    Ahnkochee Bushmaster

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    I bring my hen with me.
     
  18. Eagle

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    before the day of plastic egg cariers, would put the eggs in the oatmeal bag . those plastic Easter eggs, with a little oatmeal or rice in with the egg ,keeps em from ratteling, works good for just one or two
     
  19. The Dude

    The Dude Scout Bushclass I

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    I have used these before,but I'm trying for either compact or multi carry (eggs in corn meal).
    I like every ones comments It was head scratcher for a couple of days. The only thing I could think of was this plastic carrier. Just wanted to see what other options were out there thanks everyone.
     
  20. hunter63

    hunter63 Bushmaster

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    A traditional method was to pack them in a can/barrel of lard, along with your pork chops, bacon, or what ever pork you had.

    So you have frying lard, and keeps eggs from cracking.......Made the trip accross the country like this on the wagon trains.

    This resulted in the term, " Pork barrel" used in politics..........
     
  21. hunter63

    hunter63 Bushmaster

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    This was mentioned in George Herters Bull Cook Book and does work well.
    Herters cook books are a good reference..... if taken with a grain of salt.
     
  22. Lerch

    Lerch Bushmaster Bushclass I

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    This is one of those dammit why didn't I think of that moments. Excellent idea here. This is what I will be doing next trip out!
     
  23. cucumberfly

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    eggs

    Do any of you guys carry eggs with you in your packs? I wanted to know how this would be done considering they are rather fragile
     
  24. gunner65

    gunner65 Scout

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    Camping section at Walmart had an egg carrier.

    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 2
     
  25. HeadyBrew

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  26. VinWild

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    Scramble them ahead of time and put them in a Nalgene bottle; you can use them all at once, or for a few days; but one bottle can hold a bunch of eggs; And no shells or mess to deal with.
    The other option is to carry hard boiled eggs instead of the "ready to break" in the shell variety. ;)
     
  27. freebirdfb

    freebirdfb Supporter Supporter

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    Eggs can be left out of refrigeratation, just take note that 1 day out of the frige removes a week off of the expiratation date. Odds are that if you take eggs out, you won't need to bing them back.
     
  28. PineMartyn

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    Why we use Nalgene bottles as egg carriers.

    My wife and I carry raw eggs, in the shell, in 1-litre Nalgene bottles. Just wrap each egg in a paper towel, then put them in the bottle. They will wedge themselves in nicely, the paper towel prevents them knocking and cracking against each other, and the bottle will prevent them from getting crushed, even if your drop your pack hard. A 1-liter bottle holds about a half dozen eggs.

    Once you have used up some of the eggs and there's room in the bottle, stuff a sock or other soft item in the bottle to take up some of the space in the bottle to prevent the eggs from knocking around. We have used this technique for a decade and a half of canoe tripping and we've never even cracked an egg.

    [​IMG]

    There are advantages to this method:
    1) The container is crush-proof.
    2) The container is leak-proof, so if an egg were to break, it would not make a mess over all your other gear.
    3) You probably already own a Nalgene bottle, and if you don't, you can get one for a dollar or so at a discount store.
    4) The bottle is something you can use for other purposes once the eggs are consumed, so you're not forced to carry around a single-purpose container that takes up space and is useless for the rest of the trip.
    5) Carrying eggs in their own shell means the eggs will resist spoilage much longer than if you were to break them and pour them into a bottle.
    6) The paper towel used as packing material is then used to clean up greasy dishes and then tossed into the fire.

    Hope this helps,
    - Martin
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2013
  29. aldern.i

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    eggs

    Don't buy store bought eggs if you can help it. Find local fresh eggs (laid within a day or two) and the won't need refrigerated if kept cool. They will last for at least a couple weeks. I live in Spain and never refrigerate my eggs. buy eggs local where you can visit the farm and see the chickens. Clean healthy living conditions help produce better eggs from these stress free chicks. I do this stateside and chances are once you try a truly fresh egg you won't go back to the mega market ones.
     
  30. Joe Willson

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    Get the little pint cartons of egg beaters or the equivelant. They have them in different flavors even. They are just like scrambled eggs and can be used in any recipe that calls for egg. You can freeze them in their carton ahead of time and let them thaw in the pack.
    I eat them almost every morning for breakfast at home. I actually have an egg beater omlet in front of me this minute.
     
  31. mountain joe

    mountain joe Scout

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    If you are going in to a camp and then staying at that camp and not moving camp daily, here is another option. My dad came up with this idea many years ago. Use a size of bottle that will hold the number of eggs you want to take. Carefully break the eggs open into the bottle and throw out the shells. You will need to fill the bottle to the top with eggs. Once the bottle is full the eggs cant easily shift around and stay relatively intact with very little if any mixing. Come time to use the eggs they pour out of the bottle one by one. Once out of the shell like this the shelf life is rather short and you will want to use them up in a couple days. Also once you have used some eggs out of the bottle then they wont transport so well since there is now room in the bottle for mixing and sloshing. For a stationary camp, this method works surprisingly well.
     
  32. Bockster13

    Bockster13 Banned Member Banned

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  33. swamprat

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    Years ago you could take the glass jar that Alka Seltzer came in and crack an egg then dump it in. You kept adding eggs until the jar was full. Then you could pour them out an egg at a time. If you could find a jar or something that size (the width of an Alka Seltzer) you could carry them that way.
     
  34. sneefy

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    Carry them in the shell or buy powdered eggs. Do not crack them into a bottle and carry them tat way unless it's REALLY cold outside. Even then it's not a good idea. Eggs, once out of their shell, need to be used right away or they go off VERY quickly.

    But, hermetically sealed in the shell, they can last several days. Especially if they are unwashed.
     
  35. GrandLarsony

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    Crack them into a container (I use a glass olive jar, maybe it's 6-8 oz.) and pour them out as you need them... one yolk usually comes out with the right amount of clear stuff, too. I don't worry about spoilage or getting sick... people have told me it's fine for a week or more, but I wouldn't ever need that long.
     
  36. Sgt. Mac

    Sgt. Mac Elder Staff Member Administrator Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II Bushclass Instructor

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  37. BigFootSurvival

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    3-season I crack them open and pour them in a Nalgene. 4-season, put the Nalgene in an insulated sleeve, like the granite gear air cooler. Works like a charm to about -10F. When you get to -40 it gets ugly.
     
  38. Sides

    Sides Guide

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    Cooking in the bag is a great way to make eggs. An omelet in a bag, nice and fluffy.
     
  39. abo4ster

    abo4ster Banned Member Banned

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    Used Pringles can stuffed with paper or whatever. Raw eggs in the shell will last a long time. In many countries, eggs aren't even refrigerated in the store, they are on the shelf with the other goods. Nonetheless, consider the source as store bought eggs can be several weeks old.

    Not always easy, but you can cook an egg on a stick, so in terms of what you are carrying, the shell can be your pot too. Good luck!
     
  40. Eli

    Eli Tinder Gatherer

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    I always hard boil a couple eggs to bring along. They fit in any tight part of my food bag, which I usually keep stuffed in my small pot.
    Good for breakfast and great for a snack on the trail.
    No clean up needed either if you're keeping it simple.
     
  41. roweman07

    roweman07 Scout

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    AHH you beat me to it! This is eggsactly what I do. Except I usually use the smaller pringles can since it's usually only me going.
     
  42. P. Hills

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    I heard OVA EASY Egg Crystals are supposed to be good. They are like 7 bucks a dozen I think...
     
  43. TheRambler

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    I just use an egg carton cut down to whatever size I need. Then I wrap it in a small piece of bubble wrap and put them inside my mors bush pot. Works for me. Love me some eggs in the backcountry.
     
  44. Scott Allen

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    The trick is that they can't have been washed. The mucous membrane that is on the shell when laid protects the egg from bacteria passing through the porous shell. An unwashed egg can last quite awhile without refridgeration.

    Scott
     
  45. Seeker

    Seeker Woods Bum Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    coat them with vegetable oil... best to dip them whole and wipe off with a papaer towel... they'll last for a weeklong trip in warm weather. I carry them in one of those plastic egg crates you can get on any camping aisle.

    Friend of mine who lived in Alaska did the thermos thing. he froze them inside the thermos (left the top off in the freezer overnight after filling) and said they melted just enough to have some for his breakfast every day. kinda heavy gear for my taste, but i guess it worked.

    fresh eggs, straight out of the chicken, will last a week in pretty much any weather. my brazillian relatives had no refrigeration, and kept guineas (they don't nest... you have to go find the eggs, and you don't always find them the day they're laid). i lived with them for 2 months un-harmed, having eaten an egg for breakfast each morning.
     
  46. Wildmike

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    I go to eggstore.com and buy powdered whole eggs 6# at a time. These are real eggs not a powdered egg mixture like the military uses, they taste like eggs. 6 pounds cost $50.00 plus shipping.

    They work excellent for the boil in a bag omelets.
     
  47. bushcrafbasics

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    i just hardboil em...then you can just snack on em or heat em up and have em as scrambles
     
  48. MK-9

    MK-9 Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    Y'know I think thats what Guy gave me at Woodsmoke before he left. Never used them so I forgot what he said about them and I keep meaning to ask him about the directions on the bag. He might be one to ask about them. Been meaning to pm him about them and ask a few questions.
     
  49. steve_t

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    Make and take dried eggs: less space and weight to deal with
     
  50. QiWiz

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    Egg options

    I have used whole eggs in plastic egg carriers. Have one that holds just two, another that holds 6. Have had them a long time, can't tell you where I got them.

    Have also protected whole eggs in a bit of bubble wrap inside my pot.

    Recently, I've been impressed with reviews of the Ova Easy powdered egg crystals. Some folks even say they taste better than store-bought. I find that hard to believe, but I just ordered some from Amazon and we'll see. I want them mostly for dry baking things like Jiffy cornbread that needs eggs to make. The "just add water" brands just don't cut it for me.
     

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