Pinole or parched corn

Discussion in 'Food' started by GreyOne, Jan 17, 2009.

  1. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    I have used pinole, along with jerky and our modern "trail mix" as my camping and hunting staples for years. Most bushcrafters are familiar with jerky, though the pressed crap sold in stores should not have the name. Most of us also know and make some form of trail mix, which actually is an easy alternative to the Indian pemmican.

    What seems little known is the use of Pinole, or parched corn.

    I have taken the liberty of pasting some excerpts from the "Camping and Woodcraft" book by Horace Kephart below, to give a bit of background, and perhaps encourage some experimentation.

    Pinole - parched Indian corn; the travelers food of the pioneers.

    [ "It is Indian corn parched in the hot ashes, the
    ashes being sifted from it; it is afterwards beaten
    to powder and put into a long leatherne bag trussed
    at the Indian's backe like a knapsacke, out of which
    they take three spoonsful a day." Roger Williams,
    the founder of Rhode Island, said that a spoonful
    of nocake mixed with water made him "many a
    good meal." Roger did not affirm, however, that it
    made him a square meal, nor did he mention the
    size of his spoon.

    In Virginia this preparation was known by another
    Indian name, "rockahominy" (which is not, as our
    dictionaries assume, a synonym for plain hominy,
    but a quite different thing). That most enter-
    taining of our early woodcraftsmen. Colonel Byrd
    of Westover, who ran the dividing line between
    Virginia and North Carolina in 1728-29, speaks of it
    as follows:

    "Rockahominy is nothing but Indian corn parched
    without burning, and reduced to Powder. The Fire
    drives out all the Watery Parts of the Corn, leaving
    the Strength of it behind, and this being very dry,
    becomes much lighter for carriage and less liable to
    be Spoilt by the Moist Air. Thus half a Dozen
    Pounds of this Sprightful Bread will sustain a Man
    for as many Months, provided he husband it well,
    and always spare it when he meets with Venison,
    which, as I said before, may be Safely eaten without
    any Bread at all. By what I have said, a Man needs
    not encumber himself with more .than 8 or 10 Pounds
    of Provision, tho' he continue half a year in the

    The Moravian missionary Heckewelder, in his
    History Manners and Customs of the Indian
    Nations describes how the Lenni Lenape, or Dela-
    wares, prepared and used this emergency food:

    "Their Psindamooan or Tassmanane, as they call it,
    is the most nourishing and durable food made out of
    the Indian corn. The blue sweetish kind is the grain
    which they prefer for that purpose. They parch it
    in clean hot ashes, until it bursts;, it is then sifted
    and cleaned, and pounded in a mortar into a kind of
    flour, and when they wish to make it very good, they
    mix some sugar [i.e., maple sugar] with it. When
    wanted for use, they take about a tablespoonful of
    this flour in their mouths, then stooping to the river
    or brook, drink water to it. If, however, they have
    a cup or other small vessel at hand, they put the
    flour in it and mix it with water, in the proportion
    of one tablespoonful to a pint. At their camps they
    will put a small quantity in a kettle with water and
    let it boil down, and they will have a thick pottage.

    With this food the traveler and warrior will set out
    on long journeys and expeditions, and as a little of
    it will serve them, for a day, they have not a heavy
    load of provisions to carry. Persons who are un-
    acquainted with this' diet ought to be careful not to
    take too much at a time, and not to suffer themselves
    to be tempted too far by its flavor; more than one
    or two spoonfuls, at most, at any one time or at one
    meal is dangerous; for it is apt to swell in the
    stomach or bowels, as when heated over a fire."

    The best of our border hunters and warriors,
    such as Boone and Kenton and Crockett, relied a
    good deal upon this Indian dietary when starting
    on their long hunts, or when undertaking forced
    marches more formidable than any that regular
    troops could have withstood. So did Lewis and
    Clark on their ever-memorable expedition across the
    unknown West. ]


    My own version of pinole is frozen corn from the store or fresh corn from the garden, with the kernels lightly roasted or parched in a cast iron skillet, I use a bit of salt in the skillet and only a tiny coat of bacon grease.

    When all the kernels are parched( takes constant stirring)
    I grind them in a mortar and pestle, or a coffee grinder when in a hurry. I add a bit of cinnamon and sugar for flavor, and place in empty mixed nut cans for storage.

    This stuff is bland but palatable, filling to the stomach, and fairly nutritious, as well as being light weight and VERY long lasting in storage.

    Try it if you get a chance.

    Do a search on Pinole in the text copy of "Camping and Woodcraft" in our downloads section to read more on this useful trail food. (Don't bother to google it- the hits are mostly about California communities.....)
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2014
  2. Trekon86

    Trekon86 Guest

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    Thanks for this info!
    PMZ
     
  3. Bushpuukko

    Bushpuukko Guide

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    Not sure if its pinole, but I love my Corn-nuts and always take a sack full with me when I'm out and about. I sometimes grind them up and add them to hot water to make a paste and eat that for a quick meal.
     
  4. Tomahawk

    Tomahawk Guide

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    pinole

    Down here along the mexican border pinole is pretty popular. Ocasionally i venture accross the "line" to a shop in Naco Sonora to buy It along with green coffee beans,oxaca chocolate, Pinoche sugar cones, locally made tequila and chillies.

    The yaqui indians make a mixture of pinole,coffee,sugar,chocolate, and chilli tepines which they make into a thick drink by adding boiling water.

    It is pretty filling and tasty.

    tomahawk
     
  5. Oblio13

    Oblio13 Guest

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    I used parched corn all the time. I buy bags of frozen sweet corn kernels, and dry them in my dehydrator. Then I parch them in a skillet on the woodstove. Keep stirring them while they heat so they don't burn. They'll turn brown, swell up a little bit, and even pop a little.

    They taste sweet and good by themselves, or you can add them to soup or stews.
     
  6. Sgt. Mac

    Sgt. Mac Elder Staff Member Administrator Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II Bushclass Instructor

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    All good advice guys I'll have to try some
     
  7. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    With jerky, trail mix or true pemmican, and pinole, a good hunter could stay out for months on one packload of food I think, and never go hungry.
     
  8. sbkittrell

    sbkittrell Guide

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    I don't see much difference in this and corn meal. Am I right or wrong.
     
  9. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    The parching before grinding results in a lower water content and better keeping qualities 'I think, but it would certainly be possible to use cornmeal for it- I know they do use corn meal in ?Mexico to fix the "Pinole" corn drink which is popular there.
     
  10. Tomahawk

    Tomahawk Guide

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    atole

    its called Atole

    tomahawk
     
  11. dreamer53

    dreamer53 Tracker

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    I tried searching for pinole and, like you said got some place in California. So I tried "parched corn" and was able to get a lot of different sites for it, plus some for adding beans.(done by the hopi indians)Sounds like a good trail food.I wonder what it would be like added to soup or stews?
     
  12. reverendCPA

    reverendCPA Scout

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    I think it depends on what kind of corn meal you get, some self rising corn meal has leven in it of course and most things you buy on the shelf have some preserv. in them.

    I like the idea of parching my own, with the corn crops in these parts though that might not be an option.

    Can a person get a frozen alternative that does not contain preserv. and such?
     
  13. snakedoctor

    snakedoctor Deceased

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    Thanks for the info G1!
     
  14. tumbleweed

    tumbleweed Tinder Gatherer

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    Really interesting thread. I'm definitely going to add some cornmeal to my pack to experiment with. One thing to note for those who are making it yourself from fresh or frozen corn in a skillet-- the traditional method of cooking the corn in the ashes of a fire was actually probably pretty important from a nutritional standpoint. Lye (from the ashes) would have unlocked a lot of additional food value. This explains a lot better than I can: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hominy
     
  15. Okbushcraft

    Okbushcraft Guide

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    I make mine by toasting corn meal, not original but funtional and filling. John
     
  16. mmc

    mmc Guest

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    I make mine using thick rolled oats (not the quick cook ones).

    Brown on a cookie sheet in the oven then put them in the dehydrator
    and dry for a few hours then course grind.

    These taste alot better to me when mixed with water than parched corn.

    Of course you can also just take it dry and wash it down with a little water.

    Mike
     
  17. Old Hickory

    Old Hickory Scout

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    Here's how I make parched corn:

    The key is to use a good cast iron skillet. Cast iron makes it easy to apply the steady, medium heat that keeps you from burning instead of parching the corn. I take my skillet and spray it with cooking spray or take a paper towel and wipe some oil in it. The idea is to give just enough oil to let the kernels slide around and get a light coating, but not enough to 'pool up'. I find that spraying the skillet with cooking spray, adding the corn, then spraying the corn in the skillet works out just right for me.

    Get the skillet up to medium or medium low heat. Burning is the enemy. Next I take the raw corn and drop a handful into the skillet. Don't do too much at a time. You want plenty of room to shake the skillet and keep the kernels rolling around. You can also use a wood spoon - just keep the kernels rolling around so they don't get scorched from sitting still. Your kernels should have a slightly oily sheen on them, and they should start darkening in color.

    As the parching begins, you'll see them get darker, and finally you'll hear the kernels start to split or pop slightly. At that point, they're done. This usually takes approximately 4-5 minutes for me. To experiment, remove most of the kernels at this point and continue on. See how long it takes for yours to burn. You'll know by the smell when you've gone too long. Every stove and every skillet is different, so you'll have to experiment to find your own sweet spot.

    When they're done, they should have a nice roasted look, no burnt smell and they should be able to be eaten with only moderate pressure on the teeth.

    When you finish one batch, wipe out the skillet with an oily paper towel and let it come back up to temp before making a second batch. I also sprinkle some Sucanat on it. Sucanat is a high quality brown sugar that I've grown fond of; and find more flavorful than Turbinado sugar.

    Here's a few pics of the process.

    The raw Blue Indian Corn:

    [​IMG]

    Now it's starting to parch. Notice how it's darkening and notice that it's only one kernel deep - it's not piled up 3 or 4 kernels deep:

    [​IMG]

    Now the payoff. Parched corn coated with sugar and a hot cup of jet black New Orleans CDM Dark Roast Coffee and Chicory (that's a true Southern combination right there):

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2009
  18. tennecedar

    tennecedar Bushmaster Bushclass I

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    Can field corn that is dried on the stalk be used or must it be fresh tender corn?
     
  19. Old Hickory

    Old Hickory Scout

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    I have always used dried corn. I would imagine that fresh corn would "cook" rather than "pop" or parch.
     
  20. tennecedar

    tennecedar Bushmaster Bushclass I

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    I've got half a dozen ears of Indian corn left from Halloween I was saving for seed. I think it may not last til spring.
     
  21. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    Old Hickory, that coffee and parched corn sure looked good! :)

    My three ears of Indian Corn WILL get planted this spring. I may have to buy a bag of deer corn to work with meantime.
     
  22. Flintlock

    Flintlock Guide

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    Thanks for that post. I have used parched corn in the past and I'm also fond of the commercial corn nuts although I have broken teeth on them. I have not however tried grinding them into a powder and I think this sounds like a great project. I have a hand-crank grain mill that bought for making acorn meal which should be up to the task.
     
  23. wolfy

    wolfy Guest

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    The Museum of the Fur Trade is in Chadron, Nebraska and is world famous for its collection of fur trade articles, books, guns, textiles, and trade goods from all over the world. I've been a member for decades and they offer authentic varieties of corn that the Mandans traded to Lewis & Clark on their epic exploration of the Missouri river. They grow an Indian garden every year and offer seed for sale. I have grown several varieties, but have parched only the Mandan corn. Here's that section of their website...

    http://www.furtrade.org/4heirg.html
     
  24. Old Hickory

    Old Hickory Scout

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    Check out Blue Corn Source. I have been pleased with my past purchases from them. Excellent quality corn.
     
  25. Mattnu

    Mattnu Guide

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    I haven't parched corn, and likely won't. When I want Pinole, I just go to the store and buy it. It is relatively inexpensive.
     
  26. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    Only if you live in an area where it is commonly carried in the stores. ;)
     
  27. gloomhound

    gloomhound Guide

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  28. anubis1335

    anubis1335 Bushmaster

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    great info. learn a new trick a day!
     
  29. RudyB

    RudyB Tinder Gatherer

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    Pinole

    I found a buckskinning site (home.insightbb.com/~bspen/) where the owner talks about toasting tortilla chips in the oven at 250 degrees until brown, then grinding them and adding cinnamon and brown sugar. I've tried it and it is really good. It is quicker than drying, parching and grinding corn and the end result is pretty similar.
     
  30. Okbushcraft

    Okbushcraft Guide

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    Pinole

    If this needs to be sent into another catagory I am sorry, please put it where it needs to go, or if it just needs to go then by all means delete it. I did find this is some great info and have tried it. I have since made it part of my kit. This was sent to me a while ago, it is a bit long but a good read.

    CAMPING AND WOODCRAFT 1917
    CHAPTER X : CONCENTRATED FOODS
    The fiirst European settlers in this country were ignorant of the ways of the wilderness. Some of them had been old campaigners in civilized lands, but they did not know the resources of American forests, nor how to utilize them. The consequence was that many starved in a land of plenty. The survivois learned to pocket their pride and learn from the natives, who, however contemptible they might seem in other respects, were past masters of the art of going "light but right." An almost naked savage could start out alone and cross from the Atlantic to the Mississippi, without buying or begging from anybody, and without robbing, unless from other motives than hunger. This was not merely due to the abundance of game. There were large tracts of the wilderness where game was scarce, or where it was unsafe to hunt. The Indian knew the edible plants of the forest, and how to extract good food from roots that were rank or poisonous in their natural state; but he could not depend wholly upon such fortuitous findings. His mainstay on long journeys was a small bag of parched and pulverized maize, a spoonful of which, stirred in water, and swallowed at a draught, sufficed him for a meal when nature's storehouse failed.

    Pinole.—All of our early chroniclers praised this parched meal as the most nourishing food known. In New England it went by the name of "nocake," a corruption of tlie Indian word nookik. William Wood, who, in 1634, wrote the first topographical account of tlie Massachusetts colony, says of nocake that ''It is Indian corn parched in the hot ashes, the ashes being sifted from it; it is afterwards beaten to powder and put into a long leatherne bag trussed at the Indian's backe like a knapsacke, out of which they take three spoonsful a day." Roger Williams, the founder of Rhode Island, said that a spoonful of nocake mixed with water made him "many a good meal." Roger did not affirm, however, that it. made him a square meal, nor did he mention the size of his spoon.

    In Virginia this preparation was knowm by another Indian name, "rockahominy" (which is not, as our dictionaries assume, a synonym for plain hominy, but a quite different thing). That most entertaining of our early woodcraftsmen, Colonel Byrd of Westover, wlio ran tlie dividing line between Virginia and North Carolina in 1728-29, speaks of it as follows:

    "Rockaliominy is nothing' but Indian corn parched without burning-, and reduced to Powder. The Fire drives out all tlie Watery Parts of tlie Corn, leaving the Strength of it behind, and this being very dry, becomes much lighter for carriage and Iess liable to be Spoilt by the Moist Air. Thus half a Dozen Pounds of this Sprightful Bread will sustain a Man for as many Months, provided he husband it well, and always spare it when he meets with Venison, which, as I said before, may be Safely eaten without any Bread at all. By what I have said a Man needs not encumber himself with more than 8 or 10 Pounds of Provision, tho' he continue half a year in the Woods. These and his Gun will support him very well during the time, without the least danger of keeping one Single Fast."

    The Moravian missionary Heckewelder, in his History, Manners and Customs of the Indian
    Nations, describes how the Lenni Lenape, or Delawares, prepared and used this emergency food:

    "Their Psindamooan or Tassmanane, as they call it, is the most nourishing- and durable food made out of the Indian corn. The blue sweetish kind is the grain which they prefer for that purpose. They parch it in clean hot ashes., until it bursts, it is then sifted and cleaned, and pounded in a mortar into a kind of flour, and when they wish to make it very good, they mix some sugar [i.e., maple sugar] with it. When wanted for use, they take about a tablespoonful of this flour in their mouths, then stooping to the river or brook, drink water to it. If, however, they have a cup or other small vessel at hand, they put the flour in it and mix it with water, in the proportion of one tablespoonful to a pint. At their camps they will put a small quantity in a kettle with water and let it boil down, and they will have a thick pottage. With this food the traveler and warrior will set out on long journeys and expeditions, and as a little of it will serve them for a day, they have not a heavy load of provisions to carry. Persons who are unacquainted with this diet ought to be careful not to take too much at a time, and not to suffer themselves to be tempted too far by its flavor; more than one or two spoonfuls, at most, at any one time or at one meal is dangerous; for it is apt to swell in the stomach or bowels, as when heated over a fire."

    The best of our border hunters and warriors, such as Boone and Kenton and Crockett, relied a good deal upon this Indian dietary when starting on their long hunts, or when undertaking forced marches more formidable than any that regular troops could have withstood. So did Lewis and Clark on tlieir ever-memorable expedition across the unknown West. Modern explorers who do their outfitting in London or New York, and who think it needful to command a small army of porters and gun-bearers when they go into savage lands, might do worse than read the simple annals of that trip by Lewis and Clark, if they care to learn what real pioneering was.

    It is to be understood, of course, that the parched and pulverized maize was used mainly or solely as an emergency food, when no meat was to te had. Ordinarily the hunters of tliat day, white and red, when they were away from settlements or trading posts, lived on "meat straight," helped out with nuts, roots, wild salads, and berries. Thus did Boone, the greater part of two years, on his first expedition to Kentucky; and so did the trappers of the far West in tlie days of Jim Bridger and Kit Carson.

    Powdered parched corn is still the standby of native travelers in the wilds of Spanish America, and it is sometimes used by those hardy mountaineers, "our contemporary ancestors," in the Southern Appalachians. One of my camp-mates in the Great Smoky Mountains expressed to me his surprise that any one should be ignorant of so valuable a resource of the hunter's life. He claimed that no other food was so "good for a man's wind" in mountain climbing.

    In some parts of the South and West the pulverized parched corn is called "coal flour." The Indians of Louisiana gave it the name of gofio. In Mexico it is known as pinole. (Spanish pronunciation, pee-nolay; English, pie-no-lee.)

    Some years ago Mr. T. S. Van Dyke, author of The Still Hunter and other excellent works on field sports, published a very practical article on emergency rations in a weekly paper, from which, as it is now buried where few can consult it, I take the liberty of making the following quotation:

    "La comida del desierto, the food of the desert, or pinole, as it is generally called, knocks the hind sights off all American condensed foods. It is the only form in which you can carry an equal weight and bulk of nutriment on which alone one can, if necessary, live continuously for weeks, and even months, without any disorder of stomach or bowels. . . . The principle of pinole is very simple. If you should eat a breakfast of corn-meal mush alone, and start out for a hard tramp, you will feel hungry in an hour or two, though at the table the dewrinkling of your abdomen may have reached the hurting point. But if, instead of distending the meal so much with water and heat, you had simply mixed it in cold water and drunk it, you could have taken down three times the quantity in one-tenth of the time. You would not feel the difference at your waistband, but you would feel it mightily in your legs, especially if you have a heavy rifle on your back. It works a little on the principle of dried apples, though it is quite an improvement. There is no danger of explosion; it swells to suit the demand, and not too suddenly.

    Suppose, now, instead of raw corn-meal, we make it not only drinkable but positively good. This is easily done by parching to a very light brown before grinding, and grinding just fine enough to mix so as to be drinkable, but not pasty, as flour would be. Good wheat is as good as corn, and perhaps better, while the mixture is very good. Common rolled oats browned in a pan in the oven and run through a spice mill is as good and easy to make it out of as anything. A coffee mill may do if it will set fine enough. Ten per cent. of popped corn ground in with it will improve the flavor so much that your children will get away with it all if you don't hide it. Wheat and corn are hard to grind, but the small Enterprise spice mill will do it. You may also mixm somc ground chocolate with it for flavor, which, with popped corn, makes it very fine . . . Indigestible? Your granny's nightcap! . . You must remember that it is "werry fillin' for the price," and go slow with it until you have found your coeflicient. . . .
    Now for the application. The Mexican rover of the desert will tie a small sack of pinole behind his saddle and start for a trip of several days. It is the lightest of food, and in the most portable shape, sandproof, bug and fly proof, and everything. Whenever he finds water he stirs a few ounces in a cup (I never weighed it, but four seem about enough at a time for an ordinary man), drinks it in five seconds, and is fed for five or six hours. If he has jerky, he chews that as he jogs along, but if he has not he will go through the longest trip and come out strong and well on pinole alone."—Shooting and Fishing, Vol. xx, p. 248.
     
  31. sotramk

    sotramk Guide

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    gotta love Kephart ! I'm going to toast up some Masa Harina and play around with this.
     
  32. Okbushcraft

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    I have made mine out of corn meal and toast it in the oven. Pounded dried beef would seem a natural in it. I powdered lentils and added them to it. While I like lentil soup, that was just nasty and hard to get down.
     
  33. Darteres

    Darteres Tracker

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    Would there be any benefit to just eating the parched corn whole instead of grinding it? Kind of have something to chew on, as it were.
     
  34. Darteres

    Darteres Tracker

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    Found Masa Harina in the grocery store near the flour for $1.30 for 4.5 lbs. Grabbed two different kinds to test out.
     
  35. Darteres

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    Maybe I'm doing it wrong, but how the heck do you eat this? A spoonful is just about impossible to swallow without half a glass of water. It doesn't mix very well in a glass of water. I will have to say that I brought 1/4 cup to work with me and I haven't had any "hunger pangs", but it's not the most enjoyable of things. Easiest way I've found is to take a spoonful and chug some water. Repeat until done. I tired pouring half in a glass and filling it with water, but that was a disaster.

    Edit: to clarify, this is the lightly browned in a pan Masa Harina that I picked up last night.
     
  36. Inusuit

    Inusuit Tracker

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    Been a long time since I've parched corn, but I do remember that I used sweet corn that had dried on the stalk, not the field corn grown for livestock feed. When done, mine tasted a bit like the commercial "Corn Nuts" snack product. I didn't grind it up, ate it whole.
     
  37. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    I have not used the masa harina version, but the pinole powder from parched corn is taken in two ways. A spoonful taken dry and followed immediately by a cup of water is the quick and dirty method, where one is traveling or staying stealthed. If time and circumstance allow a fire, then a cup of water with a spoonful stirred in and heated makes a hot mush. Better in cold weather as it helps conserve heat in the body core.
    Either way, it is bland. I suggest trying it with some sugar and cinnamon added for flavor. Still keeps well and tastes a bit more palatable.
     
  38. Darteres

    Darteres Tracker

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    In my continued testing, I found that it makes really great johnny cakes.
     
  39. Vilkas

    Vilkas Warning: DO NOT trade with Vilkas

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    I must have read Kephart's writings about a decade ago as that is when I first started making pinole. I have used dried corn from the bulk food co-op and even feed corn once. I usually leave some parched (it is really tasty snack or light meal), grind some and grind some and add brown sugar and some cinnamon and or some ground chilis for eating as a gruel or dried w/ a swallow of water. I highly recommend using high lycene corn as it is a more complete protein.
     
  40. Arrowolf

    Arrowolf Supporter Supporter

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    Due to a food intolerance, I have to nixtamalize mine. That's the process of soaking in lime water and boiling the hull off. Then you can either dry the hulled corn or grind it right away into a soft masa for tortillas. The alkalizing also frees up the bioavailability of some nutrients.

    Planting Hopi Blue and Apache Red corn this weekend.
     
  41. mainewoods

    mainewoods Maine Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    yes GreyOne Thanks for the Info. My Friend!
     
  42. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    Just passing on some of the wealth in Kephart's works.
    We are all learners , and Kephart was a great teacher.
     
  43. Vilkas

    Vilkas Warning: DO NOT trade with Vilkas

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    Alkalize those suckers! I am trying to dry & parch some frozen sweet corn right now. Wow talk about watching the grass grow. This is taking way too long. works if that's what you have on hand or can't get dried whole corn., but i would rather just parch feed corn.
     
  44. Vilkas

    Vilkas Warning: DO NOT trade with Vilkas

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    As too the eating of ground pinole I grind mine maybe just a little coarser than cream of wheat not to a "flour" fineness and yes you simply take some into your mouth maybe have a little water first and then drink some water after you eat a spoon full or two. here are a few recipes for atole I found i look forward to trying some at the MO meet this weekend.

    ATOLE ~ This thick, hot drink, is not unlike thin mush. It was a favorite for Mission Fathers and Indians and is enjoyed all over Mexico today as it was in the past..
    Mix 1 cup of corn flour (masa) or rice flour with
    2 cups of cold water and
    a pinch of salt.
    To this add 2 cups of boiling water.
    Cook it, oh, so slowly; for 1 hour. There are many ways to make atole.
    For plain atole ~ serve as is.
    For spicy atole ~ add a little chile.
    For fruit atole ~ add some fresh or canned fruit
    For sweet atole ~ add a little brown sugar with cinnamon
    For chocolate atole ~ add cinnamon, sugar and grated Mexican or bitter chocolate to the atole and you have made champurrados ~ or a "full bodied" hot chocolate.
     
  45. wsdstan

    wsdstan Guide

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    I use regular old Grits. Its coarser than pinole. I use it as a side dish, mix it with meat and/or gravy for a main course, or eat it like hot cereal with honey and milk. I confess to using instant grits when camping as the regular ones take awhile to cook. :D I am going to try pinole and see if I like it as well as grits. Thanks for an interesting post.
     
  46. Sgt. Mac

    Sgt. Mac Elder Staff Member Administrator Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II Bushclass Instructor

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    I've had a nalgene bottle filled with G1 reciepe for a year now. I took some up to the UP with me lastspring. It aint the most tastey stuff, but it will fill your meat pouch and keep you on your feet for sure
     
  47. Vilkas

    Vilkas Warning: DO NOT trade with Vilkas

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    allright just finished grinding a batch of frozen corn (maize) that was dried and toasted on my stove top. First off it took forever after it had reduced about 50% and had a good color and a good nutty caramelized flazor i finished in the oven to dry it out. The result it is a lot sweeter than using the dent corn I normally use so much so I would only add a little brown sugar to it or preferably honey if i was making a gruel. I haven't weighed it but I used a 1lb bag of corn and have maybe 4 oz of pinole. Store bought pinole would be cheaper but lack the flavor this has. I still prefer my parched dent corn over this frozen sweet both for value and flavor as the dent corn has more of a nutiness to it not to mention parched dent still retains enough size to munch on as a snack. The time and cost of frozen corn also does not make this realistic for large quantities (I have six kids) so time to rustle up some dried dent. Thanks for the tip G1.
    Also I highly recommend parching wheat berries as well the flavor is a little nuttier but it is fairly interchangeable plus it is usually easier to come by as China Mart used to stock 25 lb bags.
     
  48. Wayland

    Wayland Scout

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    I've been wondering about this stuff for a while.

    I've got some corn meal, I reckon I might try parching it in a pan on the hob to try it out.

    Any idea how long it needs or what signs to look for?
     
  49. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    Brown , not burnt. I have never tried it with meal, it is fairly easy to judge with the kernel corn. I like the field corn, or some of the native varieties better than sweet corn.
     
  50. Okbushcraft

    Okbushcraft Guide

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    I have made it out of meal-just toasted on a cookie sheet in the oven until it barely started to change colors. Not what most call traditional pinole but it does keep very well and seems to give the same results to the gut.
    I love this thread! It just keeps giving.
     

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