Porcupine skinning cleaning?

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Gathering' started by nickosnow, May 8, 2010.

  1. nickosnow

    nickosnow Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2010
    Messages:
    1,513
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    Skype:
    mrniceguy2014
    There are a few porcupine dens where my dogs like to run. I have to get rid of them or my dogs will pay the price. I'd hate to just kill the pests and waste them. I have poor skinning skills as is, but I know the basics from skinning some rabbits. And I'm on a limited budget. Can yall offer some advice on how to skin and clean porcupine?
     
  2. riley

    riley Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2009
    Messages:
    814
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    arkansas
    Hey man i have no idea on skinning. I would guess turn it over and work stomach to back. sorry i couldnt help more. If and When you do get them skinned you think you might want to trade some quills?
     
  3. lonetracker

    lonetracker Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2010
    Messages:
    1,312
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    iron mountain mi. upper peninsula
    i shot and ate one last winter they skin easy,like any other critter just be carefull of the quills.pick up all quills when done.they can get stuck in your dogs feet just from being steped on,and work there way in deep.it is edible,very oily.mine had a slight pine taste.save some quills someone on here may want some.
    here are a few pics of a skun one,not much info on the actual skining

    http://www.bushcraftusa.com/forum/showthread.php?t=9031
     
  4. mountain1

    mountain1 Guest

    Blog Posts:
    0
    a friend of mine made porcupine jerky from one he shot. it was guite good. i have also read that if you parboil the critter for a while then roast or fry it up it's quite good. i've always wanted to roast one over the fire but haven't came across one.
     
  5. nickosnow

    nickosnow Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2010
    Messages:
    1,513
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    Skype:
    mrniceguy2014
    well it looks as if porcupine is on the menu someday this week. I'm going to try and teach my dogs to avoid them at the same time.

    After reading around about tanning I don't think it's worth it but yes I will save any quills. I was just going to wash them with warm water unless... Is there any specific technique to preserve them?
     
  6. karlsefni01

    karlsefni01 Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2009
    Messages:
    1,167
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Middle of the Mitt
    I wonder if wearing a pair of tight fitting leather gloves would help much.
     
  7. wesleyds

    wesleyds Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    May 1, 2010
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    0
    I've skinned a couple of them. Gloves really aren't necessary but do be carefull. Them porcupines got pointy things all over 'em. If you get them out of a pine tree you are better off just taking the quills because the meat will taste like a pine tree. YUCK!
     
  8. Malamute

    Malamute Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2009
    Messages:
    3,219
    Likes Received:
    171
    Location:
    Northern Rockies
    Skinning them isnt that hard to do, just open him up along the belly like anything else, and peel the hide back as you go. The quills are nice for decorating stuff. They were used before beads became common, and still some afterwards. A few do quill work today. You woun't need to do anything to the quills to preserve them, but if you want to save the whole skin for someone to use for quill work, you could just freeze it and mail it to them wrapped in something insulative(and a couple good plastic bags), and maybe a couple freeze packs. Should be good long enough to ship.
     
  9. Bushcraft Bill

    Bushcraft Bill Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2009
    Messages:
    212
    Likes Received:
    0
    OK here is a tip for anyone who wants to deal them critters quills burn them off in a good fire first then gut/skin out....
     
  10. jus_like_that

    jus_like_that Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2010
    Messages:
    553
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Burton, UK
    I've seen that somewhere, about burning them off 1st, I've seen hedgehogs cooked in clay, then you take the clay off and the spines come off with it. but you need a bloody lot of clay for one of them! :D
     
  11. nickosnow

    nickosnow Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2010
    Messages:
    1,513
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    Skype:
    mrniceguy2014
    Of course there hasn't been any around this week.. He'll be back... he'll be back :D. I will try and post some picture when I git him. Thanks for all the tips fellas.
     
  12. Bushcraft Bill

    Bushcraft Bill Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2009
    Messages:
    212
    Likes Received:
    0
    But for gods sake don't kill a porcupine when your in the bush leave em their for that person who gets lost in the woods and needs a meal to stay alive....

    fist time I heard about eating hedgehogs but hay why not if the need arises
     
  13. Troop

    Troop Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2010
    Messages:
    403
    Likes Received:
    0
    I know that I'm going to get bashed over the head for saying this, but, for whatever it's worth...
    I went to Ron Hardt's survival school up in Vermont 20 years ago.
    He advised not to eat porcupine. Because, (now this is him saying this),
    "They sleep in their own feces."
    I don't know if this is true, I've never eaten porcupine.
    - Don't mean to start an argument; just thought you should know what an expert said to me.
     
  14. lonetracker

    lonetracker Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2010
    Messages:
    1,312
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    iron mountain mi. upper peninsula
    totally true,i have seen it piled 3 feet deep in old den sites.most animals pay little attention to there feces and stand in it lay in it and eat stuff covered in it on occasion.look at cows in a field.yuk
     

Share This Page