removing scent glands

Discussion in 'Food' started by veggiop, Jun 21, 2011.

  1. veggiop

    veggiop Tracker

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    I have been looking for info on where the scent gland are on a deer and other animals like coons.I have killed lot of deer and coon to eat but I always wind up throwing it out because it has that tainted taste to it.I have looked and looked for videos on this but have found none.Even onpork beef there are scent glands.that would make meats taste better if one knew where these are
     
  2. smokewalker

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    The scent glands on a white tail are located on the inside and outside of the rear legs. Cut them out first thing after hanging your tag and before field dressing.
     
  3. sons of scotland

    sons of scotland Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    honestly, no you should not mess with them, the less you play around with those glands, the better off you are gonna be. Getting any of the gland secretions on any of the meat is gonna make it taste gamey. If, you do decide to remove the tarsal glands wash the knife that you use before field dressing or butchering your deer, or use another knife that has not touched the glands, Also wash your hands after handling the tarsal glands. Deer urinate on their glands. There is bacteria on these glands and you don't want to spread this to the meat.
     
  4. wolfy

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    I agree 100%. One thing I do on squirrels is to remove the nasty little tan glands in their armpits....I don't see that mentioned in tutorials, but it's worth it.
     
  5. Katdaddy

    Katdaddy Scout

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    I have dressed a lot of deer and never tried to remove the glands. I have seem quite a few articles in outdoor mags which recommend against it.
    How do you mean the meat is tainted?
     
  6. 3fires

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    I don't remove the scent glands on a deer unless I'm taking them into the field as bait, and I don't do that. But, I do be careful not to touch them when cleaning the deer. If I touch them I wipe off my hands and knife real good before touching the meat. They look like a darker greasy patch of hair by the rear "knees" of the deer.

    I honestly don't know if it will taint the meat, but they do stink, so...

    I also remove the brown fatty stuff in the armpits of a squirrel, and the scent glands which are on the forelegs just rear of the wrist and appear as a few extra long hairs which remain sometimes after the squirrel is skinned. I just cut down under the hairs and remove that whole little section where they are attached to the flesh.
     
  7. Malleus

    Malleus Scout

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    I've never messed with scent glands in any deer I killed & never had an issue with my meat being tainted. In my own experience overly gamey flavor comes from improper field dressing. Field dress the animal right where it lays rather than moving it to another location.
    Just my own experience and two cents. YMMV
     
  8. Cddogfan1

    Cddogfan1 Tracker

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    X2 Best Advise I can give is field dress your game promply and cool it down as quick as possible. Also shot placement is key, meaning do not gut shoot it. And in the field dressing try not to cut or puncher any of the guts. Clean your blade periodiacly as you work also.
     
  9. Flintlock

    Flintlock Guide

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    I grew up in a deer hunting family and understood from early age that it was necesary to remove the tarsal and metatarsal glands prior to skinning.

    Now, several decades later, I can report that removing the glands makes no difference in the taste of venison. I butcher as soon as possible and no longer bother with the glands.
     
  10. Old Philosopher

    Old Philosopher Banned Member Banned

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    Wow... I've never met anyone who DIDN'T remove the glands, especially from a buck, before even gutting it. I don't worry so much about does, but bucks are nasty!
    The main glands are located (as mentioned) in the inside rear knee.
    [​IMG]
    It's not so much that leaving them on is going to somehow "infect" the meat. But if they are left on there is a good possibility that the secretions can come in contact with the meat, or your hands when skinning the animal. I've killed some bucks in full rut, and the "juice" was actually running down their legs!
    I pinch the skin above the gland, and pull as I cut through the hide. Take as much hide as you need to, to keep from coming in contact with the gland itself. So far I've never cut one, or got any stuff on my hands or knife.
     
  11. pure_mahem

    pure_mahem Guide

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    My experience as well Malleus.

    As for the squirells I never bother with all that it just isn't worth it, I usually just cut the hind legs off and take the tail if it's a good one I can use for my flies and use the rest of the squirrel for coyote bait. There is a little more meat on a squirrel but I don't find it worth the extra time, just shoot another squirrel.
     
  12. wolfy

    wolfy Guest

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    Holy Cow! You feed the backstraps to the 'yotes?
     
  13. pure_mahem

    pure_mahem Guide

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    Well unless the Squirrels rabbit size, yeah! I like the legs, I've always been a legs man, lol! Except when it comes to the chicks then I'm like a littl wing and a little thigh, LOL!
     
  14. 3fires

    3fires Guide

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    MAAAAAN! The backstrap and inner loins is the best part on any 4 legged critter.
     
  15. Stain

    Stain Scout

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    yes, I know this is an old thread but I thought it might help someone in the future to put this up, especially since generic google searches point me back to this thread. As with others, I have struggled with my googlefoo at finding out what a gland looks like on a raccoon. Everyone says to be sure to remove them but I cannot find a video or photo even though it has to be out there somewhere. The best I can find is a description saying it looks like a bean. The first coon we cooked tasted fine to me so we got lucky. On the second coon, though, I think I found one of them.

    Looked very carefully while skinning but found nothing unusual. Then, while cutting it up for final cleaning before freezing I was trimming off all the fat and was trimming out the fat that was between the front shoulder and the front shank and there it was. At least, I think that is what it was. Could not smell anything on it but it fit the description. The other shoulder had already had this section of fat removed so I assumed the gland on that side had went with the fat and i did not notice it as I was not looking inside the fat. See the photo below.

    possible racoon gland.jpg

    For the record, the first coon was just roasted in the oven with some salt and butter and it was pretty tasty. Sweet tasting. This second one is going in the freezer hoping to get a couple more before a big potluck coming up.
     
  16. blackhawkhunter

    blackhawkhunter Supporter Supporter

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    I have shot and butchered lots of deer and never bothered with the tarsal glands. Never had a problem with tainted meat either.
     
  17. Ceedub

    Ceedub Guide

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    I cut them off first thing when they are down in the field. I carry at least two knives with me while hunting and use (usually) a pocket knife for cutting them out so as not to taint my main skinner/gutter. In Idaho you'll get a very hefty ticket for wanton waste if you don't take the back straps and loins (which are by far the BEST cuts). Idaho fish and game only within the last couple years has allowed you to leave the neck and rib meat. I still take the rib and neck for burger and stew meat. Leave meat on the carcuss at your own risk and defiantly done leave it in my state. Wasting meat on big game is a big pet peeve of mine. Ive also done late season mule deer hunts and shot large bucks deep into rut and all you have to do is hang them for an extra week before cutting them up and their as good as a young doe once on the plate.
     

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