Scandi vs Convex

Discussion in 'Edged Tools' started by skylar, Sep 8, 2012.

  1. skylar

    skylar Tinder Gatherer

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    I am going to be ordering a new Bushcraft knife soon. Scandi seems to be the flaovor of choice for that type of Knife, perhaps due to the popularity of the Ray Mears knife. A number of people who's opinion I respect prefer a covex grind for a Bushcraft knife. Is it just a matter of personel prefrence or does one have an advantage over the other on a Bushcraft knife.
     
  2. Iz

    Iz MEMBER of a BANNED Bushclass I Bushclass Instructor

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    Buy an affordable knife of each flavor and use them. It won't be long before you discover the merits and detraction of each one for yourself.
    That's really the best and most honest way too do it. Otherwise you'll hear about a billion opinions for each side and you'll still not know what to use.
    Most of the fun is in doing the discovering yourself.
     
  3. kgd

    kgd Dr. Fishguts Bushclass I

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    I think a scandi provides the most easily learned and intuitive grind for making fuzz sticks that a knife can possibly have. They are also easy to sharpen on a stone. On the other hand, a convex blade is more robust and can just withstand a lot more harder abuse. If you want to use a knife the day Iz likes abusing his, then a convex is a way to go. If your knife is reserved for slicing and cutting and the odd bit of whittling with an axe doing to the tough chores, then a scandi is one of the better bets. In the end though, you get a feel for how each works with practice. A person used to convex isn't going to like the feel of a scandi on initial use and vice versa. But its not rocket science either. Fifteen minutes of fuzzy making, knotching and whittling will tune your hands to a blade if you are already familiar with bladework. So don't sweat it to much. A good knife is a good knife and you will probably make it work for you whichever grind it has.
     
  4. BushBum

    BushBum Guide

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    I used to stress grinds allot. The older I get the less I care as long as I can get it sharp.
    scandi, flat, convex, Hollow, sabre, chisel..lightsabre. they all will do everything a knife should do, from carving a tent peg to cleaning a trout. (the lightsaber will also cook the trout)
    I think if you plan on using a knife allot, a good comfy and grippy handle is important, and often overlooked.
    Iz give sound advice as usual.
    I'd go cheap first, experiment, and find what you like.
    Welcome aboard, and godspeed in your quest.
     
  5. bourbon&bisquits

    bourbon&bisquits Scout

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    if the axe is convexed ---a convex knife would minimize sharpening supplies you need to carry

    and obviously if the axe has a v grind i'd go for a knife grind to use the same stone(s)

    and most of the time i break this rule of simplicity and take way too many sharp things with me
     
  6. briarbrow

    briarbrow Banned Member Banned

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    it depends; there are many variables, and neither term is specific enough to actually say what is or what for.

    A good bushcraft knife should have these 2 qualities. 1. a sushi chef would never use it. 2. A teenage girl would let it rust.
     
  7. Fat Old Man

    Fat Old Man Supporter Supporter

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    I love it!
     
  8. J

    J Bushwhacker Bushclass I

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    You wont find better advise then this. Straightforward, not biased, non confrontational. I agree with them 100%.
     
  9. nazzrock

    nazzrock Guide

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    Knives / Grinds Are Like Women

    We all have are own tastes on choosing one .
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2012
  10. Ranger

    Ranger Guide

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    I can't add any wisdom that has not already been stated. Good luck on your choice and post up some pictures of it or them!
     
  11. Mudman

    Mudman Guide Vendor

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    I like both, Scandi is easy to sharpen. Convex I still have a lot of trouble with. Both are easy to make fuzz sticks and baton, but the Convex feels smoother doing both.
     
  12. TaigaTreader

    TaigaTreader Scout

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    I agree with mudman. Both are killer for cutting performance, but a flat scandi is so much easier to sharpen... I freehand mostly, so when I am very deliberate I can get a good intentional convex going, but it seems like after I have the edge profiled it's hard to keep it sharp without having to bring out the heavy grits again.
     
  13. draco

    draco Guide Bushclass I

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    What Iz said. For what it is worth the scandi is easier for me to sharpen.
     
  14. Sides

    Sides Guide

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    I must be different. I prefer convex, it is easier for me to sharpen.
     
  15. pitdog

    pitdog Guest

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    What kind of wood you will be using most might also be a factor. I feel Scandi's are best used on soft woods, if your gonna be working a lot with hardwoods then you might find the edge keeps chipping and you would be better with a convexed !
     
  16. draco

    draco Guide Bushclass I

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    LOL and that is why Iz gave the best advice.
     
  17. woodsghost

    woodsghost Guide

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    I prefer the convex. I used Scandi grinds on my Mora's for years. I tried a scandi on a new knife, and have started converting all my knives to convex.

    Like Iz said, spend $20 to $30 on two Moras, sharpen one to a scandi and the other to a convex. Try them both, and see which you like best.

    I fell the convex cuts more easily. It "pushes" through wood more easily, though the scandi "bites" more, and cuts deeper. The deeper cutting seems to bind more in wood. This is just my experience. Nothing will beat your own first hand experience.

    The convex edge holds up much better than the scandi for the work I do and the way I use my knives. My scandi edges kept rolling. Even the convex edge rolls, but far less than the scandi.

    As always, your mileage may vary from mine. Only your own first hand experience will truly tell which one best fits your needs.
     
  18. kahuana

    kahuana Supporter Supporter

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    Very well put, Iz.
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2012
  19. Chinook

    Chinook Scout

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    I'd second this approach. It's really more than just the grind that makes the knife. There are so many variable elements to compare that you really have to get a knife that looks and feels good to you, and maybe that others have used and liked, and see what you think after using it. I very much like the scandi grind on many knives (e.g., I have several Moras and Helles), and I use them alot, especially for woodworking. But my most used and preferred Bushcraft knife is a Falkkniven F1 with a convex edge.
     
  20. FishingJunkie92

    FishingJunkie92 Guest

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    I like convexed because it can take more abuse and is easier to use in fine tedious work. But I like scandi as well. I would go with whatever is cheaper for you and seems like it will fit your needs.

    Jeremy
     

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