Simple instant bear bagger

Discussion in 'Backpacking' started by Bluegill, Jan 6, 2013.

  1. Bluegill

    Bluegill Scout Bushclass I

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    After spending too much time running around trying to bag my pack on cold nights, I have found a simple setup that attaches to the outside of my ALICE pack. It is just forty feet of paracord with a loop at each end attached to a heavy duty carbiner. So far, in the yard, it has been pretty easy to lob the carbiner over a limb and then clip it on my pack. Hopefully, it will work in the bush as well. No grizzlies or super savvy bears where I hang out, so this might be all I need.

    2013-01-06_17-29-03_827.jpg
     
  2. Tcc3

    Tcc3 Tracker

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    It's a simple, time saving idea. The best ones always are! Thanks.
     
  3. Ambu

    Ambu Tracker

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    What is a bear bagger?

    I tried to google it, but I came up with motorcycles..
     
  4. Bluegill

    Bluegill Scout Bushclass I

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    I suppose it is not really a word now that I think about it. It is just something that you use to get your food or pack tied up high in a tree before going to bed when there are bears around who might sneak up and take it while you are asleep. There are some pretty elaborate systems in places like Shennandoa where bears are very used to humans and have learned how to raid their food and pull it out of the trees. Some people try to make elaborate rope hangers, while sometimes all you need is to pull the pack over a branch eight feet off the ground. Where I camp there are black bears, but they are not all that used to people, so all I usually do is pull my pack about ten feet up and tie the other end to a nearby tree. The problem is, it is late at night when I am doing this, and I always end up looking for a stick, tying it to my cord, and trying to heave the stick over a branch and then knot it to my (and a friend's ) pack. It always is more of a hassle than I think it is going to be. Hopefully this will save me a step.
     
  5. snapper

    snapper Scout

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    Have you ever looked into using an Ursack? Essentially it's nothing more than a kevlar bag that animals can't chew through. I've been using them in NYS (both Catskills and Adirondacks where bear canisters aren't required) and haven't had any issues yet. If you tie them properly to a tree, animals shouldn't be able to walk off with them. While food may be crunched by an animal trying to rip them off the tree, you won't loose anything (at least you shouldn't). The company has a website where they have video of a bear trying to get one of their bags. You might want to check it out. The link is: http://www.ursack.com/

    That's all for now. Take care and until next time...Be well.

    snapper
     
  6. Joe Willson

    Joe Willson Guide

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    I got hundreds of miles of commo wire into trees while in the Army using a canteen. We tied the wire to a canteen and chucked it. The weight of the canteen kept it from hanging up on a branch and getting stuck in the tree.
     
  7. snapper

    snapper Scout

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    For what it's worth, I wouldn't use anything as my weight that I'd be afraid to lose. I've seen folks use their water bottles for weight and then gotten them stuck in a fork or branch. While it doesn't happen all that often, I know of at least one case where it did. That person now puts a rock in a zip-loc bag so if the rope/rock gets stuck, they can pull down and (hopefully) rip the bag so they can at least get their rope back. I've also seen folks who haven't tossed a bear bag much actually turn the place into a hard hat area since their aim isn't all that good. You'd be surprised at how far (and fast) a weight can bounce back off of a tree. It's because of all this that I finally turned to using the Ursack. Just my experience. Take it for what it's worth...

    That's all for now. Take care and until next time...Be well.

    snapper
     
  8. oldsoldier

    oldsoldier Guide Bushclass I

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    Funny I run across this, as there was some discussion about these around a campfire last weekend. I carry an A+ slingshot, pretty much whenever I go on a walk in the woods (I'm a giant kid :) ). Someone asked if that could be used to launch a small rock, tied to 550 cord, over a branch. Honestly, I've been carrying a slingshot for a year-and this thought never ONCE occurred to me. So, yeah, I will be trying that method out soon enough!!! I dont know if the weight of the 550 cord would be too much for the projectile, but, with the primary goal of only shooting maybe 20' in the air, I SHOULD be ok. I will give it a shot soon, and report back. Kind of puts a little fun into hanging a bear bag :)
     
  9. Joe Willson

    Joe Willson Guide

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    You could also tie about 20' to 30' of masons twine to a fishing sinker. Shoot the sinker, tied to the lighter line, over the limb then use that to pull your 550 cord into place.

    ---------------------------
    Illinois Slumdog#6
     
  10. Bluegill

    Bluegill Scout Bushclass I

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    That Ursak does look really cool.
     
  11. wahoowad

    wahoowad Tracker

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    Great idea using a carbiner - because it can often be used for another purpose too. I like all my gear to try and serve at least 2 purposes.
     
  12. Bush Bear

    Bush Bear Scout

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    Have you heard of the PCT method of bear bagging. It uses a rope, carabiner, and small sack to hold rocks or some other weight. You clip a small bag with a rock in it to your rope, toss, clip it to your food bag, hoist the bag all the way up, tie a stick on you line as high up as you can, and lower the bag until the carabiner hits the stick.

    It's easier than it sounds and you don't have to tie the rope to anything so you food wont drop if something chews your line.
     
  13. CRQuarto

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    Have you guys tried those odor blocking bags? I've used them numerous times in conjunction with a bear bag and haven't had an issue with bears or squirrels.
     
  14. Keldo Maj

    Keldo Maj Tracker

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    more often than not my camping is in winter when the black bears are not active, but last time I camped in late fall before the bears den up and instead of hoisting my food bin, I brought low-odor food, wrapped it carefully odor-wise as I could without any expensive high tech stuff, put it all into a cheap plastc storage bin, then left the bin on the ground about 50 yards from my camp and cover it with brush and branches so I would know had it been messed over.
    There was no evidence that any animal large or small had showed any interest in my food cache even though the usual suspects, bears wolves rodents crows etc. were in the neighborhood. That was in the Black River State Forest in West Central Wisconsin. It was early November. My camp was miles from any campground. Bears know campgrounds are likely to have some food around them. But they wouldn't be expecting human food around just any old random spot in the woods.

    Even harder than throwing a line over a branch in some of my favorite places, is to even find a suitable branch. Reason I like my hide it on the ground idea. If the ground is not too frozen to dig a little pit, you could even store it subterraneously. (had to use at least ONE big word.) If I ever to that, I would cover it with a blanket or big pieces of bark to make a neater job of opening the hole each time I retrieved some food. I heard that the old time people used to leave dried meat in rawhide boxes in or on the ground covered with rocks and branches etc. I never did hear tell their success rate in finding the caches undisturbed.
     
  15. IamRambo

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    I look forward to hearing how this works out haha
     

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