Snow plowing with a Chevy

Discussion in 'Transportation' started by roadwarrior, Nov 22, 2016.

  1. roadwarrior

    roadwarrior Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I had to sell the Ford because it was getting to old. I bought a Chevy 3500 and a plow, does anybody plow with a chevy and how does it handle the over the road driving? This is my first independent front suspension, my Ford had a straight axle.
  2. RavenLoon

    RavenLoon axology student Supporter

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    Last plow truck I had was a 1989 k2500 Chevy. New front ball joints almost annually. Part of that was rough gravel roads in the summer although I never had to replace any ball joints on the Fords or Toyotas I've owned. Otherwise it was OK although plowing in general is a lot of wear and tear.
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  3. pm327

    pm327 Tracker

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    I install and service plows for a living. I probably put more on Chevy's/GMC's than any other make. What brand of plow did you get?
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  4. roadwarrior

    roadwarrior Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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  5. Crusher0032

    Crusher0032 Scout

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    I plowed with both a straight axle and IFS Ford using Meyer plows. It was my experience that independent front ends like to eat ball joints regardless of brand and Fords eat radius arm bushings (which your Chevy won't have.). I've seen many complaints on Chevy tierod ends, but depending on the year of your truck, that issue may have been fixed already.

    Plowing is easy money but it is rough on trucks. Not hard to make $700-1000 in 24 hours from a single storm if you get the customers lined up right. Make sure you get the truck clean afterwards, being out in the salt just eats a truck, and it really makes removing plow parts a pain if they get the chance to rust together. I added a cheap salt shaker to my truck and increased my profits well beyond the $600 or so I paid for it. Some places want salt put down before snow events so you can charge them two different fees for a single snow storm. Wasn't sure if you were going that route, but figured if you were Id give you a little to think about. Really hope it works out well for you
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  6. roadwarrior

    roadwarrior Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    The truck and plow are new, I had a plow route before but I am not sure about this time. I got both because of my Lyme disease and I won't have anybody do things for me.

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