Spoon Blanks

Discussion in 'Other Skills' started by dub, Mar 19, 2017.

  1. dub

    dub Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Looking to try my hand at a little carving. When I Google spoon blanks I get spoons that are like 90% complete. I've seen blocks of Basswood but I'm unsure if Basswood would make a decent spoon or what size I should get.

    What do the carvers here recommend as far as wood type, size of the blocks, and good places to purchase?
     
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  2. Schwert

    Schwert Guide

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    Pinewood Forge offers birch spoon blanks, dry wood.

    They also offer basswood, great for learning but too soft for a good user spoon.

    These are nice for learning or group work....but green wood is nicer to carve.

    I do not know of a source of green blanks since Frank Foltz died.

    Sourcing your own local greenwood is recommended.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2017
  3. Schwert

    Schwert Guide

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    Local green...look for:

    Birch
    Fruit woods...cherry, apple, apricot, etc
    Alder
    Buckthorn
    Mesquite
    Maple


    Stay away from resinous conifers.

    Look for natural bends and crooks or split radial slabs from a larger round.

    See a Pinewood Forge reading area for tips and buy Willie Sundqvist's book...also at Pinewood Forge.
     
  4. stillman

    stillman Guide Bushclass I

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    I think basswood is OK for utensils that won't get wet, sugar spoons, coffee scoops, etc. I also think it's OK for wet food if you have protected with with something like oil and/or beeswax that will soak in and waterproof.

    However, green wood is easy to carve and shaping the blank is the easiest part. All you need is a limb, hatchet, and chopping block of some sort. It doesn't have to be a special hatchet but you'll eventually want one. The chopping black can be a scrap piece of 2" lumber, turned so that you are striking the grain crossways.
     
  5. Angelgutter

    Angelgutter Supporter Supporter

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    Carved my first today! Not the prettiest in the world but it's mine and now I have 1 under my belt.....started with a 2 1/2" 18" seasoned red oak limb from the wood pile! Just jump in with what ever ya have! Experience is only gained one way my friend! Just goofing off while burning leaves, Here she is in all her glory!
    image.jpg image.jpg

    It can only get better from here, and now I know what not to do...
    By the way, I carved it all with a turley green river, the hooked blades are awesome but not necessary,and cleaned it up with a little sandpaper. Got nowhere to go but up right?
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2017
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  6. T. Pollock

    T. Pollock Hobbyist Hobbyist Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    You can get non kiln dried 2x2 turning blanks from a few places but I'd recommend harvesting your own green wood. It'll be much easier to carve.
     
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  7. Backyard

    Backyard Supporter Supporter

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    Birch is a great wood to learn on. I find Maple to be excellent as well. Look for neighbors that are cutting down trees, there are usually pieced no one wants. The most I've paid for green wood was the gas money to get there and back.
     
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  8. forgeblast

    forgeblast Scout

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    Green wood is going to be easier to carve. Less dust, less cracking/splitting of the grain.
     
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