Stove? Central or on the wall?

Discussion in 'Winter Camping' started by Moondog55, Jan 3, 2017.

  1. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    Wall is probably the easiest, centrally warmer
    If I use the central position I need some guidance on how best to install the vertical flue
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    The only reason for using this tent is cost
    They want $145- which The Boss says I can spend
    Also while I haven't made the stove yet the design is fixed in my head and I have all the material to make it with here
    I am considering the central position because this tent will most probably collapse in the first snowfall unless I add in an extra vertical pole to support the roof [ as well as a couple n each side I guess] wall is easiest but is centrally the best?
    12 * 12 plus the vestibules
  2. Natch

    Natch Tracker

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    How do you plan to make the stove jack in the top of the tent? I've thought about buying a tent like that and doing something similar, but not knowing how to do that kept me from doing so.
  3. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    Good question and I really don't know.
    Getting a good tight seal between flue and tent would probably need a silicon gasket but then how to put the wind cap on?
    There is mesh in the top of the inner and I'd over-sew that with fire blanket with an "X" in it to fit the flue
    I think I'd have to thread the flue though first then put up the tent, fussy but it is for a 3 month fixed camp not an overnite stay
    I'd probable put a sleeve type slot in the top of the fly and get one of those rubber boots already attached to some aluminium sheet or maybe just silicon and rivet it in place
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  4. DarrylM

    DarrylM Scout

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    How many people are sleeping at once? If it's just you, or two of you sharing the heat of the stove, you'd maximize your living space putting it near the wall. If there's 3 or more, everyone gets a better share of heat from a central stove.
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  5. beeperboy

    beeperboy Scout

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    If you go through the wall with the flue, you have less hot embers falling on the roof. That's what I did on my canvas wall tent. The stove was next to the door, so it was easier to load with firewood. This configuration makes the best use of floorspace, and people can find the spot that the temperature suits them best. I sleep next to the stove, so I can stoke it without having to get out of my sleeping bag.
  6. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    Mainly me or me and a mate both with king size cots.
    I think I will really need that strong centre pole as well as the frame
    If I go though the wall that is easiest
    Being double skin it won't take much to heat. Hmmmm? Rubber boot on the tent wall or the fly? On the fly I may need some serious reinforcement in case it shakes a lot in the wind
  7. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    Well the extended vestibule is where I'd stash the ready use wood
    The door is fixed on one side so the best place to put the stove is on the RH side in the attached picture
  8. beeperboy

    beeperboy Scout

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    I've had the best sleeps of my life in my tent with wood stove crackling.
  9. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    Me too. Probably because I'm tired from all the wood sawing and chopping
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  10. Bitterroot Native

    Bitterroot Native Scout

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    Is a tent with a stove really necessary in Australia? I admittedly don't know much about the land down under, but I hear it's hot, dry, and kangaroos.

    I would put the stove near the wall. Makes for better space in a tent I think.
  11. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    In winter above the snowline most definitely
    IMG_0020.JPG [​IMG]

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    Yes we get snow, lots of it at times; heavy wet snow and very similar conditions and terrain as Scotland
    These pictures are taken with 2 different tents and a month apart, 160 klick winds and a metre of snow will do that. lost 3 cheap tents last ski season
    Need to dry out the ski clothes after all
  12. Bitterroot Native

    Bitterroot Native Scout

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    Haha I sure ate my own words! I clearly see the need for a stove now Moondog55. The trees and snow in those pics almost looks like some of the high deserts of the American West in winter.

    Thanks for sharing that, Australia is a much more diverse place than I thought!
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  13. Todd1hd

    Todd1hd Tracker

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    I read the words "rubber boot" a couple of times in the above posts. If I am thinking correctly that you want to run the stove pipe through the rubber boot for a water tite seal, the rubber will not stand up to the heat of the stove pipe for long.
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  14. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    When I say rubber hear silicon rubber, good to 880C but even the ordinary black rubber should be good to over 300C and after the stack robber heat exchange there shouldn't be much heat left
    I don't think I have mentioned the stack-robber in this post, basically LW steel top-hat; the kind used for drywall; wired around the flue then painted with high temperature enamel.
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  15. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    Not as cold as the Continental 48 but hotter in some places; Marble Bar and Death Valley are similar for instance.
    We get snow over 800 metres in the South Eastern part of the continent in winter, very seldom below that but the High Plains area is quite big but above the snowline average winter temperatures seldom drop below -12C although we have had record lows of -28C in a few places.
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  16. Keyser Söze

    Keyser Söze Usual Suspecto Supporter

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    thick fiberglass cloth doubled up for the pipe exit, put stove and pipe in middle

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