taking the plunge.

Discussion in 'Homesteading' started by cobbsteve14, Jan 6, 2017.

  1. cobbsteve14

    cobbsteve14 Scout

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    After a lot of thought and finally finding a nice piece property my wife and I are going to take the plunge and try and make a go at homesteading. I realize this isn't the best time of year to try and build but as being a builder this is my slow time so I have some free time. I was wondering those of you that have done the homesteading bit, if you have any advice? The current property has a small one room cabin with electric so there's at least a starting point.
     
  2. One Legged Josh

    One Legged Josh Dirt Merchant Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass Instructor

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    Winter is for hunting, reading, and making firewood. Best of luck!

    -almost 7 months offgrid in Northern Ohio....
     
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  3. cobbsteve14

    cobbsteve14 Scout

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    I realize that but being a builder in northern Michigan it's the only real time I'll have.
     
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  4. 1773

    1773 Guide

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    I would recommend that you don't build any fixed structures until you have been on the land a little while and decided exactly where you want what. Also when you do build structures, I would recommend that they all be situated in close proximity to each other as it saves a lot of time in caring for the various animals and doing different tasks if you don't have to run from one side of the place to the other to get things done.

    You will find that time becomes a very precious commodity if you plan on holding down a regular job as well because there is a lot of work to be done around the place. We don't do the off grid thing and use modern equipment but it still takes a lot of time to feed, water, clean up after them, prep garden spots, plant, work the garden, harvest, preserve etc etc so everything you can do to save a few steps and a few minutes pays huge dividends over time.

    Also since you are a builder by trade, I think you will understand this but built it right the first time, if you don't have the time or money to do it then wait until you do, it takes more time and money to do multiple times than it does to do it right the first time. I have seen people who have built/rebuilt the same structure 3 or 4 times because they wanted to save time and money when they would have saved both if they had used quality materials and techniques to start with.

    Don't get in a big hurry to buy things, plan your operation and when you do buy, purchase equipment that meets your end needs not your needs right now, that saves buying twice
     
  5. Crusher0032

    Crusher0032 Scout

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    Not sure if this is too basic for you, but this gentleman's videos are about starting his homestead from scratch the old fashioned way. I purchased his book on pole buildings last year and it was excellent also.


    Best of luck to you on the new project
     
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  6. hunter63

    hunter63 Bushmaster

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    Congrats.....its a journey.
    Besides building a dwelling and out buildings,.... what are your plans for the homestead?

    Try to make it pay off full time on sight?..... or supplement with working away from home.
     
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  7. cobbsteve14

    cobbsteve14 Scout

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    For the first little while I'll do the normal work but I have a small side business and both the wife and I make stuff we sell at flea markets and such so between that and what we produce on the property is how we eventually would like to make our living.
     
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  8. NC_Veiðimaður

    NC_Veiðimaður Tracker

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    My Father and Mother have been homesteading for years and run a youtube channel on the whole deal. Doug and Stacy off grid or something like that.
     
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  9. hunter63

    hunter63 Bushmaster

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    Very cool.......
    Keep us posted.
     
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  10. ewtoutdoors

    ewtoutdoors BCUSA Friend Bushcraft Friend

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    Good luck on starting your adventure. :dblthumb:
     
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  11. gila_dog

    gila_dog BCUSA Friend Bushcraft Friend

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    I've built 3 homesteads from bare land. I agree with 1773 that you should spend some time there and get the feel of the place before building anything. I've learned to lay things out in a way that avoids having cold, icey, muddy north facing driveways and entrances to buildings. Arranging things so that I have a south exposure as much as possible makes things less muddy and icey. This is especially true if you are going to have animals and will be building a barn or shed for them. Think about drainage. Don't put buildings or animal pens in low lying spots that will stay wet and muddy. It's good to have shade trees on the west to protect you from summer afternoon sun. But watch out building things under big trees, especially cottonwoods. They can drop branches and smash whatever you put under them. Once you know how you want things laid out, I've learned that the 1st thing to do is put in a good driveway with crushed gravel if possible. You will be coming and going, trucks will be delivering stuff, other workers will be parking, etc. Doing all that in the mud will be miserable. Next is a carport or shed where you can stash materials and have a dry, shady place to work. Transportainers are ugly, but they are cheap and make really good storage buildings. A transportainer with a shed roof sticking off to the side, or 2 transportainers with a roof spanning between them gives you a lot of storage and work space for the $. Then put in a septic tank, or at least a good outhouse. I've lived out of my camp trailer while building things, but you soon have to deal with sewage (your own and other peoples'). Placement of the septic tank will determine the layout of everything else. It has to be downhill and not too far from where you put your house. It will also have a big drainfield, and you need to think about that. It's really nice to be able to hook an RV or camp trailer to it so guests with their own camper rig can hook up to it. And you certainly don't want it where vehicles will be driving over it. Then electrical power. Life gets so much easier with electricity. Then a well. Can't live without water. But the well and septic tank have to be a certain distance away from each other. Check the laws about that. Good luck, and I hope it all works out for you.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2017
  12. cobbsteve14

    cobbsteve14 Scout

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    I appreciate all the advice. One thing I have going for me is I've lived around the area since I was 5 so I have a good idea of where I want most things. As for a septic and such I'll be running a composting toilet and a small leech field for the grey water.
     
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  13. cobbsteve14

    cobbsteve14 Scout

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    Not much but it's a start. IMG_20170306_092628.jpg Resized_20170303_141119.gif IMG_20170105_140132.jpg
     
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  14. Patriot Bushcraft

    Patriot Bushcraft The Environmentalist Supporter

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    Good on you and the best of luck.
     
  15. .356luger

    .356luger Scout

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    Check out the presby (sp?) System if you have flat ground and need a septic.
     

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