The Recipes of our Ancestors

Discussion in 'Food' started by Shnick, Jan 3, 2013.

  1. Shnick

    Shnick Bushwhacker Bushclass II

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    After much deliberation (and one generously given Amazon gift card), I just ordered a whole bunch of Lodge Cast Iron.

    Even though I picked up a cookbook with the order, I'm interested in recipes handed down to you by your family, for either campsite or kitchen.
    Doesn't matter if it's a soft boiled egg or a Blueberry Crepe, it's all about the story behind it...

    Professor, I know your YT channel well, but I betcha you have them all in one word .doc somewhere on your PC...
    Winchester, I never wrote that Brunswick Stew recipe down. Been craving that since Sept.

    So, c'mon folks, dust off the old cookbooks and share the handed down family recipes you forgot about long ago.
    Open that index card holder between the bottle of stale bottle of Guatemalan Cardamom and that unopened can of Old Bay you got in 1979.
    I'm talking about the recipes your Mom had for sticky buns, or your weird uncle Elmer's recipe for Jalapeño & Peach Jam.
    The stuff you grew up with that STILL puts a smile on your face.

    I'm not one for asking without giving, so I'll go first with the story behind it.
    My Grandma would make Bread Pudding every year for Christmas Dinner. It was an "event" in of itself.
    Her parents learned about this recipe from a German family who preferred Pumpernickle, but any leftover bread will do.

    I got this recipe from my stepmother after Grandma passed away.
    It was on an old, yellowed and tattered index card, just one of hundreds she saved over the course of a very long life.
    Her cooking was always filled with love. Pass it on...

    Bread Pudding:
    3 Eggs
    1 1/2 C Sugar
    2 Tbsp Brown Sugar
    1/2 Tsp Cinnamon
    1/4 C Melted Butter
    3 C Milk
    10 Slices Pumpernickle, toasted & torn (not cut) into 1' cubes.
    1 C Raisins

    Preheat oven to 375°.
    Grease 2 Qt baking dish. Glass works best.
    In a mixing bowl, whisk eggs, sugar, brown sugar, Cinnamon, Butter & Milk together, then stir in the bread cubes and raisins.
    Pour into the baking dish.

    Bake until browned and firm in the middle, 50 to 55 minutes. Cover with foil halfway thru.Sauce:
    1/2 C Brown Sugar
    1 Tbsp Flour
    1 Pinch Cinnamon
    1 Egg
    2 Tbps Melted Butter
    1 1/4 C Milk
    1 Tbsp Vanilla Extract
    For the sauce, mix Brown Sugar, Flour, Cinnamon, Eg, Melted Butter and Milk together over medium heat until smooth.
    Stir constantly for about 10 minutes, or until it thickens enough to coat the back of a spoon. (about 10 minutes) Add Vanilla.
    Pour sauce over warm bread pudding.

    Try it and let me know how you like it!
    (Although I already know) LOL
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2013
  2. cellis

    cellis Post less. Do more. Supporter Bushclass II

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    Grandma sent me these all the time as a boy. At the month long wilderness camp a box of these was the greatest package ever. She used to frost them but that is too sweet for me now. I may make some right now actually and coincidentally had this out when I saw this thread.

    Molasses Cookies

    3/4 c. shortening
    1 c. sugar
    1 egg
    1/4 c. molasses
    Cream together and add

    2 c. flour
    2 tsp. soda
    1/4 tsp salt
    dash of cinnamon

    form in ball. flatten slightly and bake at 350 for 8-10 min.
    Enjoy.

    do you need molasses sent in pacgage?
    Mom
     
  3. foxfire

    foxfire Supporter Supporter

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    Now that recipe brings back lot's of memories of my great grandmother.
     
  4. Prof

    Prof Guide Bushclass II

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    Thanks, Shnick! While it's true that I have binders, index cards and computer files full of recipe ideas, my favorite ones really don't need a recipe at all.

    Forty years ago, when I grew up on the farm, it would take about all morning to do the chores. We had several old milk cows, so we'd carry out 3 or 4 bales of hay and water them from a hand pump at the well.

    The hogs needed even more water, and we kept two tank heaters,which were coal and wood-burning stoves submerged in the tanks, to keep the water free from ice. It was my job to cut the wood and keep the fires burning in them day and night.

    By the time we got all these chores done it was nearly lunch time. Mom worked as a nurse at the doctor's office in town, so Dad and I often had to shift for ourselves. On occasions like that, he'd say: "Let's just have some bacon and gravy!"

    I read later that there really is a recipe for bacon gravy: 2 tablespoons of bacon drippings, 2 tablespoons of flour and a cup of milk, but Dad never referred to it or measured anything.

    While he fried the bacon, I'd mix up a batch of biscuits and roll them very thin, the way Dad's grandad liked them, with the "two crusts rubbing together."

    Within a half hour from first scratch, we'd have a plate of steaming bacon gravy over crispy biscuits with scalding hot cups of coffee made in the old drip-o-lator to wash it all down.

    [video=youtube;mysiBE3qX1k]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mysiBE3qX1k[/video]
     
  5. cellis

    cellis Post less. Do more. Supporter Bushclass II

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    They are great, I have what's left of two dozen now been meaning to make a batch for ages. Did it exactly like recipe but I got this natural sugar with some kind of hippy name we've been using and would add a bit more if using that type of sugar next time as that are not quite sweet enough. My sweetness palette or however you say that is much less tolerant now to sweet things living here but these are a touch bland even for me.
     
  6. William van den Broek

    William van den Broek Tracker

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    Here in The Netherlands and in the old days.

    they baked some bacon as long as possible until it was dry and there was a lot of bacon gravy in the pot.
    they put it in a bak and let it solidify. after it was solidify they lubricate it on bread with sugar.

    As far i know they eat it in the winter, even I eat it sometimes when it is very cold.
     
  7. renter6

    renter6 Scout

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    My dad used to make Chicken Paprikash from a family recipe. Both his parents were old-country Slovaks, steel-town folks from Johnstown, PA. I never learned to make paprikash (not too late I suppose!) but I did learn to make and enjoy the accompaniment: halushki, a small dumpling-like noodle similar to spaetzle. These are not the same thing as halupki, the stuffed cabbage dish.

    These are super simple to make.

    1. Start by bringing water to a boil in a soup pot, whatever you would use to boil pasta in. Salt the water well, there aren't many flavors here to work with!

    2. On a dinner plate, make a mound of wheat flour and clear a space on the inside, so its like a donut or a volcano. Into that you crack an egg or two, and start mixing with a fork. I can't specify quantities, something like a cup of flour and one egg, maybe two eggs is a start.

    You mix this together until it has the right consistency, like a very sticky dough. It will almost run if you hold the plate on edge.

    3. Hold the plate in one hand over the boiling water. With a paring knife, you scrape kidney bean-sized bits of this dough into the boiling water. Dip the knife into the water here and there to keep the dough from sticking.

    Pinch by pinch, the whole batch of dough goes into the water. When cooked, they are about the size of a wad of chewing gum, because they absorb a little water.

    4. Drain the whole pot into a colander, and serve with a gravy, like you would egg noodles.

    My dad was one of nine kids, and they frequently had these halushki mixed up with a little cheese for dinner, and nothing else!

    Never made these at camp, but they are some serious comfort food around our house.
     
  8. rdec

    rdec Guide

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    A classic hunter sandwich:

    Fry up some bacon, fry a large, rather thin pancake in the bacon fat, remove from pan. Sprinkle the pancake with light brown sugar or granulated maple sugar, arrange bacon on the pancake and roll up. Wrapping in aluminum foil you can carry this in your pocket.

    In cold weather the fat tastes good and you really need it. Many people complain about losing weight on long treks when they are eating dried/freeze-dried foods. The reason, I suspect, is that they are not getting enough fat. Adding olive oil to the meal gives you fat and make the stuff taste better (at least it does for me). Peanut (or other nut) butter also provides fat and, of course, so does bacon.

    Most wild game is also low in fat so the addition of cured, smoked bacon is a real plus.
     
  9. JRW87

    JRW87 Tracker

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    Not exactly ancestreal, probally my Nans recipe and a family favourite -

    Buy a packet of choc chip cookies, bottle of ginger ale and some cream.

    Whip the cream to soft peaks then dip a cookie in the ginger ale and piece together the dessert using the cream as mortar in any shape you want, a straight log works well for serving. Cover the whole thing in cream and stand in the fridge for 2hrs before serving.
     
  10. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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  11. Winchester

    Winchester Scout

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    Granddad Winchester's Brunswick Stew

    Well you asked for it and called me out.
    The funny thing is when Grandad taught me this recipe it was because it was a secret and He said,"I'm teaching you this because it goes back a long ways and I know your Daddy can't keep a secret!"
    But I figure you all are part of my extended family, so here we go!!



    Growing up we always had our Winchester side of the family reunion on Thanksgiving. The family would come from all over to meet on a piece of family owned land and camp, that is right camp. Out in the middle of nowhere were three buildings, if you can call them such. One was a huge screened in old pole barn, another was a smoke house, and lastly a bathroom. The water came from the well on the back side of the smoke house. I remember growing up camping and sleeping under the stars at these events. I thought growing up that I was terribly unlucky because I was an only child and what Granddad called a misplaced child. You see in my family I was the only kid my age, poor planning on my folks part, tried for 7 years to have me, so all the cousins were either 7 years older or 7 years younger than me. So I had no one to play with, I know that you brothers that know me just now thought, Well that explains a lot!!.
    But what it really meant to me as I look back was that I was the luckiest, I always chose to stay with the men and listen, watch, and learn from them!! They taught me more in my formidable years about life and what it means to be a man then at any other time in my life. I will add that what we need is indeed more men showing and teaching our younger generation, glad to be part of a brotherhood that promotes this!!

    Sorry about all that but that was the price of admission. Now for recipe.
    • Boston Butt
      Whole, or leg quarter Chicken
      Season with caverndares, and season salt/ heavy handed on season
      Smoke all the meat together until the chicken is done/ if you can bend the leg over and it pops out it is done. Take the chicken out and continue to cook butt until you can pull the bone out.
      Pull all the chicken and butt apart and set a side
      In a big pot mix fresh sweet peas and fresh cut off the cob sweet corn/ you can use 4 cans of leseurr young sweet peas and 4 cans do whole kernel corn, pour juice and all into pot.
      Next mix a bottle of each/ ketchup, Worcester sauce, Heinz 57 sauce, Barbeque sauce of your choice, I use my own. A squeeze of mustard, two spoons full of molasses, a box of brown sugar, hot sauce to taste.
      Combine all the ingredients together in a huge Dutch oven, a 16 or bigger. The family used a large syrup kettle.
      Bring to a boil and let simmer until you are about to starve to death and eat hot with close family and friends!!
    Good eating Mark! May this bring you closer together with your family as you tend to the smoker and the pot! Great time to be shared around the cook shed!
    From my family to yours enjoy!
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2013
  12. Bosco

    Bosco Tracker

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  13. Amish

    Amish Scout

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    These are from my cousins.



    Pimento cheese:
    This is how Aunt Dottie fixes hers. Velveeta cheese mashed together with pimentos, a little pimento juice, mayo, & sweetener to taste. At home, sometimes I grate up extra sharp cheese instead of the Velveeta to use. Depends on what I have a taste for. The recipe I have given you is how Aunt Dottie, Aunt Annie Lee, and my Mama all made it. Good luck! : )


    Aunt Frieda's baked beans:
    1/3 cup light brown sugar
    1/3 cup ketchup (name brand that is less watery is better but any will do)
    1/3 kayro light (white) syrup (we use store brand best value)
    2 16oz can of pork and beans
    1 med size onion (this can vary depending on how much or how little onion you want)
    1 package of bacon

    turn oven to 350
    in a casserole dish mix in ketchup, brown sugar, kayro syrup and onions. Once all mixed until its smooth (no clumps from brown sugar) drain the beans in a strainer to remove excess juice and then add them to the mix. Mix everything together until its well blended. Then lay slices of bacon across the top of the dish. Cover put in oven for 1 hour. Remove lid and back another 20/30 mins until bacon is done.

    Tips, if you want it less greasy you can pre cook the bacon some,
    the less watery and the more drained the beans are the less time it takes to cook. You don't want the beans to be soupy when they are done.
     
  14. Shnick

    Shnick Bushwhacker Bushclass II

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  15. rackem1899

    rackem1899 Tracker

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    My girlfriend gave me a 5L Lodge Dutch oven for Christmas! I was supper excited until I realized... I don’t have a single recipe to make! I asked my mom, who is responsible for my love of cooking… and it turns out I actually have a few family recipes that have since been adapted to modern cooking equipment! My mother can recall my great grandmother using only cast iron, however, all of the records have been adopted to modern cooking equipment (unfortunately). Anyways, here are some family, heritage, recipes you may enjoy.
    PS: I’m ½ Portuguese (3rd generation form the Azores) and ½ Irish/German (living in the same small town since 1850), however, most of my cooking influence comes from my mother (Portuguese):

    Portuguese beans: (not all that different from regular beans, but I can trace this recipe to my great grandma who arrived in America in 1916)
    1 ½ cups pink beans
    Water
    1 medium onion, diced
    3 pieces of bacon, chopped
    1 small can of tomato sauce
    Salt/peper to taste
    ¾ tsp ground cumin
    ¼ tsp ground all spice
    Sort and rinse beans. Pour in large pot soak the beans in water overnight. Drain water and replace with clean water. While waiting for it to boil, cook the bacon and onion together until onion are translucent. Set aside. Add onion, bacon, cumin, allspice and pepper to pot of beans. Do not add salt until the beans are fully cooked. Once the beans come to a full boil, lower the heat and cover. Cook approximately 1 to 1 ½ hours on low. Add salt and tomato sauce. Adjust spices to your liking.

    Soupish/Sopas
    Most ethnicities have a recipe that is indigenous to their region (pizza = Italian, ect) this is a recipe that has great significance to Portuguese. It started during a time of famine, when the queen decided to have a feast/celebration in honor of our Lady of Fatima (Portuguese are typically Catholic). Despite the economic and food scarcity problems, the queen feed all of the people of the land this dish. Depending on the Portuguese population in your area, you may be able to still take part in this celebration, which is now commonly referred to as “Portuguese feast, or Festas”
    4lbs chuck roast
    2 soup bones
    1 onion, chopped
    4 cloves garlic
    1 TBS whole cumin
    1 tsp whole allspice
    1 tsp whole cloves
    4 bay leaves
    4 cups White wine
    4 cups chicken broth
    5 cups Water
    1 can (8oz) tomato sauce
    1 head cabbage cut into four wedges
    Salt & pepper
    1 loaf (day old) French bread

    Cut meat into 2”x2” cubes. Place whole spices: cumin, allspice, bay leaves & cloves – into cloth bag (new baby sock, tea steeper, cheese cloth, ect)
    Slowly cook (low heat) meat, in chicken broth, wine and water mixture with soup bones, onion, garlic, spices (in container), tomato sauce until meat is tender. Add salt and pepper to taste. Add cabbage and cook for an additional 30 min (low heat).
    Cut French bread into slices, place on a plate. Serves dish with juice from pot onto the bread and serve.

    Unfortunately, these recipes have been modified to not use cast iron, although I’m told they were originally done in cast iron. Anyways, though I would share my family’s recipes with you all… I look forward to hearing yours!
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2013
  16. bigcknott88

    bigcknott88 Scout

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    Renter you making my mouth water. My step side of the family is polish from pennsylvania they always made halushki just a lil different same noodles but mixed in fried cabbage and served with kielbasa and redundant but peirogies. I'm gonna have to introduce my wife to pennsylvania cooking.
     
  17. renter6

    renter6 Scout

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    Back at you, that all sounds pretty good!
     
  18. rb

    rb Guide

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    OMG that brings back memories of how much we ate last September at Chickenstick! I thought I was gonna explode!
     
  19. Ewker

    Ewker Tracker

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    Jam Cake

    I have nothing to add but was wondering if anyone remembers their parents making a Jam cake? I had a recipe (it was 40-50 yrs old) from my mom but it got lost, misplaced or thrown away by accident so I am looking for another one.
     
  20. Eugene

    Eugene Tracker

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    You don't need a recipe to use it, you can cook nearly anything in it. I grab beef and pork roast when Kroger has them buy one get one free and make one fresh and freeze one for later.
    Have made roast, pulled pork, beef brisket, home made vegetable soup, etc.
     
  21. rdec

    rdec Guide

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    Dutch ovens can also bake biscuits, pies, fruit cobblers and other baked goods.

    One of our family recipes is crepes.

    Crepes (French Pancakes)

    1 1/2 cups Flour
    4 eggs
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 1/2 cups milk
    1/4 cup milk

    Beat eggs completely in separate bowl.
    Mix flour, salt & milk until smooth
    Slowly mix in beaten eggs until well mixed.
    Add 1/4 cup milk to bowl with eggs to clean bowl of all eggs. Mix into mixture. Batter must be very thin.
    Let stand at least an hour before cooking.

    Heat cast iron frying pan (or the lid of the dutch oven) with bacon fat. Set at medium temperature. Use ladle. Pour into heated pan just enough to cover bottom. Spread batter over bottom of pan. Let cook approximately a minute or two then turn over. Cook approximately a minute. Remove from pan.

    The cooking fat of choice in our family was bacon fat, carefully strained into a small snap-top crock my mother kept in the refrigerator. My sister's comment on this is: "Crepes definitely need bacon fat. I tried them one time with butter because I didn't have bacon fat, they were terrible." Though that may be because we are used to the flavor of bacon fat.

    Crepes can be used in many ways. As a breakfast my family prefers serving with lemon and sugar. (Squeeze some lemon over flat pancake and lightly sprinkle with sugar. Roll and then lightly sprinkle with sugar and lemon on top.)

    They can also be lightly spread with jam or jelly, or filled with fruit and rolled then topped with whipped cream for a dessert.

    Served with meat, they can be rolled and spread with gravy.

    They can be filled with cooked ground meat or seafood, rolled and served with an appropriate gravy or sauce.
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2013
  22. OddTheViking

    OddTheViking Guide

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    Cool thread. Thanks for sharing the recipes.

    My ancestors were vikings (some of them). They ate lutefisk. You don't want to eat that.
     
  23. Pappy Frank

    Pappy Frank Supporter Supporter

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    make a thick pancake batter, dip your bread (what ever flavor you like) into the batter and fry like French Toast.

    My Uncle gave me this recipe over 30 years ago.
     
  24. Seniorman

    Seniorman Guide

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    Here is one my mother made many times, years ago. I've made it quite a few times also. It's best in summer when corn is fresh.

    FRIED CORN

    12 ears young, tender, sweet corn
    2 Tblsp. butter
    ½ to ¾ cup of cream
    ½ teasp. salt & pepper

    Split the corn kernels lengthwise. Stand the cob on end in a bowl and with a sharp knife slice off the kernels. Gently scrape the cob after removing the kernels.

    Heat butter in a large cast iron skillet or D.O., medium heat, and put in the corn and cream. (Or milk if you have no cream.)

    Fry, stirring constantly so it doesn't burn, about 15 minutes, +/-. Add salt and pepper, turn down heat to medium low, add a bit more cream or milk and let it simmer for about 15 minutes. Continue stirring.

    You can't beat good fresh fried corn made in a cast iron skillet of D.O.

    Enjoy.

    S.M.
     
  25. Seniorman

    Seniorman Guide

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    Here is an outstanding video on how to make great biscuits in your D.O. I've made them several times like this, but Ron in the video, explains it far better than I can, plus he shows you how.

    Ron is a Dutch Oven/Chuck Wagon cook outside the Buffalo Bill Museum in Cody, Wyoming.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FrTBVT9LFb0&NR=1&feature=endscreen

    S.M.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2013
  26. wulfesinger67

    wulfesinger67 Guide

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    when you have left over grits, hot ceral or oatmeal let it chill in a bowl or pan and then slice or form in to patties dust in floor and fry in skillet . serve with syrup, honey,mollases or melted butter..also great lightly buttered and sprinkled with chili powder.

    (its a twist on fried mush , scrapple or pawnhaus or pallenta what ever you want to call it)

    i like it with fried sowbelly, fresh side. chops, ham , bacon,,you get the idea.

    it sure beats throwing out the left overs!!
     
  27. Shnick

    Shnick Bushwhacker Bushclass II

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    We are... Along with my Japaleno & Cheese Cornbread!
    [​IMG]
    Thanks!
     
  28. Winchester

    Winchester Scout

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    Man oh Man!! That cornbread is the bomb!!!!!!!!!!
     
  29. Pappy Frank

    Pappy Frank Supporter Supporter

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    A few days ago I posted "so you want to be a cook give away" There is a lot of information about old ways of cooking, including an old Quaker cook book and the Confederate Army cookbook and some other interesting information on a CD I put together. It includes three things I wrote myself, Cast Iron Care, Sourdough cooking, and Fat Franks Fabulous Flapjack recipe book. I think you would enjoy all of it, but you can't win if you don't enter.
     
  30. HoosierArcher

    HoosierArcher Banned Member Banned

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    Not ancestral but one of ny camping favorites first night in camp.
    Steak frite
    One 8 to 22 ounce ny strip or ribeye or sirloin per person
    Fresh cracked black pepper
    Sea Salt
    2 ounces of brandy
    4 ounces of cream or half & half
    Olive oil
    2 TBS flour
    Cast iron skillet
    Season the meat just with salt to start
    Get your skillet hot
    And 1 tsp olive oil and wirk the sjillet so the oil evenky covers the coojing surface.
    Place the steaks in the skillet
    Cook 3 minutes on the first side then turn
    Season the now cooked side generously with black pepper
    Cook second side 3 minutes then turn snd season the now cooked side generously with pepper
    After 1 minute turn the steaks again and cook 1 minute more on thst side too.
    Remove steaks from pan set on a platter and cover with aluminum foil and allow stesks to redt at least 5 minutes.
    Deglaze the pan with the brandy
    Add 2 TBS of olive oil when hot stir in the flour and make a roux
    Cook roux to a tan color and chosen dairy product and stir until well blended.
    Stir frequently until sauce thickens taste and adjust seasoning
    Pour sauce over steaks on the plate. Serve with fried potatoes
     
  31. gijills

    gijills Tracker

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    Enchilada Casserole:
    1 lb HB
    Small onion
    Garlic powder
    Med can Enchilada sauce
    Can of chopped tomatoes
    2-3 cans of Pinto beans
    Lots of cheese
    3-4 Enchilada or flour burrito shells

    In a DO brown the meat onion and garlic till done. When done add ½ Enchilada sauce and ¼ tomatoes. . Simmer. When heated up remove ¾ of the mix place a burrito shell on top and sprinkle cheese then meat then pinto beans some Enchilada sauce add another burrito shell repeat till all meat mix is don top with 1 more shell and cheese and bake for 45 mins and serve in bowls bread would make a good side as well as on corn chips.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2013
  32. gijills

    gijills Tracker

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    Coffee Can Chicken

    Here is another one. is is not a Cast Iron one but it is Yummy!!!
    Coffee Can Chicken or chicken in a can

    1 whole chicken (no more than 3 1/2 lbs)
    butter
    salt
    pepper
    heavy duty aluminum foil

    Directions
    Punch or drill holes in gallon size tin can 1 inch up from the bottom and spaced 1 inch apart around the can. Place 13 (18?) briquettes (no more no less) in the bottom of the can and light. (The can gets hot enough to burn the grass below it so be very careful where you place the can.) Rub chicken with butter and season as you like. Wrap chicken with heavy aluminum foil twice. (First in the side to side direction and then from bottom to top. Make sure foil closing point is on the top of the chicken.) Once charcoal has turned white, place the chicken into the can with the legs facing the top of the can. It's perfectly fine if the chicken sticks out of the can. Leave the can and chicken sit for 3 hours. When 3 hours has past you can remove the chicken from the can and when you open the foil the chicken will be fall off the bone tender, juicy and delicious.
     
  33. riverjoe

    riverjoe Supporter Supporter

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    This is great .
     
  34. riverjoe

    riverjoe Supporter Supporter

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    Moms Old Fashioned cake . Recipe no doubt came from Switzerland . It weighs about 5 pounds and it has the unusual trait that it gets better the older it gets .After a week it really gets good .
    My wife never liked it , but my brothers and I loved this thing . I gotta look for the recipe .
     
  35. ron d

    ron d Scout Bushclass I

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    Sunday Supper

    After Church we usually ha a large meal with either a roast or a roasted chicken. Often times at supper we would have Navy beans cooked in a pressure cooker with salt pork. These would be poured into a bowl that had crumbled corn bread already in it . On top was some chopped up onions and some black pepper.

    I still make it . And it can be found at cookouts when the family gets together.

    ron d
     
  36. riverjoe

    riverjoe Supporter Supporter

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    Here is my moms old recipe for Old Fashioned cake .
    This cake is indestructable . One time we dropped it off the counter shortly after pulling it from the oven and removing it from the bundt pan . That thing took a bounce or two flipped over and came out right side up as if you never knew anything happened to it .
    I think it was so popular with mom because you NEVER refrigerated it .Mom grew up on a hardscrabble old farm over in the Ohio flats with 14 brothers and sisters . I was talking to my wife and she assures me that I would continure eating it a month or so after we made one .

    So here's the recipe .

    2 cups sugar 1 white 1 brown
    2 eggs
    Heaping cup of shortening . ( probabley Crisco but mom always saved fat from bacon in a can too)

    1 cup sour milk ( 3/4 cup whole milk 1/4 cup vinegar )
    1 teaspoon sodey 1 teaspoon salt
    Nuts and Raisens . ( Hickory nuts sometimes when we had a good year )
    The more the better as far as I was concerned but mom did not specify .
    3and 1/2 cups flour .
    Bake at 350 in a tube pan she called it . Bundt pan I guess .

    Don't know exactly how your supposed to mix the ingrediants or how long to bake . It should reach a golden brown on the out side and use a toothpick I guess .
     
  37. Moe M.

    Moe M. Supporter Supporter

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    Old family recipe for baked beans.

    I just sat down to read some of the threads and spotted this one, it's ironic that I should read it now as i've just put a pot of baked beans from my Mothers family recipe passed down to her from her mother who got it from my Great Grandmother.
    I bake mine in a porcilian lined cast iron dutch oven, i have a couple of antique bean pots also passed down from my parents, but for some reason they are just a hair too small for a full pound of dried beans after they have been soaked and simmered for a half hour, the small dutch oven is just the right size and works very well.

    The recipe calls for 1-pound of dried Great Northern or Navy Beans.
    1- half pound of lean salt pork. (1/3 pound of bacon sub.)
    3- Tps of brown sugar.
    3- Tps. of molasses.
    3- Tsp. of maple syrup.
    2- Tbs. of catsup
    1/2- tps. of dried mustard powder.
    1-tsp. each of salt and black pepper.
    1- med. yellow onion chopped course.
    2- cloves of garlic minced.

    *** Soak the beans overnight, drain and add fresh water, simmer for about 20 minutes, a white scum will form on the top of the water, after simmering, drain and rinse the beans.
    Mix all the ingredients except the beans, onions, pork, and garlic, next layer the beans, onion and garlic, and diced pork or bacon in your pot until all used up, then pour the wet mixture over the beans and mix well.
    Now pour in just enough boiling water to cover the beans, cover the pot with a tight fitting lid, and bake in a slow (250 degree) oven for about eight hours, after the first two hours check the water level in the pot, if water is needed mix 1 Tsp. of salt with one cup of boiling water and bring the level back up, check the beans very few hours after that and add water from the cup as needed.
    The beans will turn a rich dark brown during baking, and the liquid will get thick, when the beans are tender and for the last hour of baking cook them uncovered, stir the beans twice during the cooking process.

    Enjoy.

    Measurements ----- Tsp. = Tablespoon.
    tsp. = teaspoon.
     
  38. Shnick

    Shnick Bushwhacker Bushclass II

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    Boston Butt Dry Rub

    This is a recipe the wife had laying around, her family has been using this one for years.

    Boston Butt:
    Lather Pork Butt with Honey Mustard as a binder.
    Apply Dry Rub on top of Honey Mustard

    Dry Rub:
    1tbsp Ground Cumin
    1tbsp Garlic Powder
    1tbsp Onion Powder
    1tbsp Chili Powder
    1tbsp Ground Cayanne Pepper
    1tbsp Salt
    1tbsp Ground Pepper
    1tbsp Paprika
    1/2 Cup Brown Sugar

    Bake in Roaster Oven @ 300 for 7 hours.
    Remove to a bowl and shred with a fork.
    Add BBQ sauce of your choice.

    Sidenote:
    We went out for errands and came back to the house about 1/2 way thru cooking.
    You could smell every ingredient in the Dry Rub throughout the entire house.

    Should look like this when done:
    [​IMG]
     
  39. Winchester

    Winchester Scout

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    Chili Pie

    Chili Pie
    Granddad made this on those cold cold cold nights in Flordia! Ok ok when it got cold out camping for to us.

    2 lbs Ground Chuck
    2 12 ounce can tomatoe sauce
    2 12 ounce cans spicy chili beans
    Chili powder
    worcheshire

    3 boxes jiffy made corn bread
    eggs

    Brown meat in bottom of ditch oven adding Worchesire and chili powder to taste
    Once drained add tomatoe sauce and chili powder. Let cook until cornbread mix is made.
    Pour cornbread mix over chili. Place lid on and add coals on top and bake until cornbread is golden brown.
    Cornbread mix runs down into the chili and bakes up nicely.

    Add hot sauce to taste top with cheese and eat up!!!
     
  40. cellis

    cellis Post less. Do more. Supporter Bushclass II

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    Oh man pulled pork. This recipe is not from the ancestors it was found on the internet but oh man. I swear I have had dreams about this sauce with pulled pork cooked on my smoker. Warning this is blasphemy where you are living now in brisket country.

    Columbia Gold Barbecue Sauce Recipe
    Yield. About 4 1/2 cups. Click here to calculate how much you need and for tips on saucing strategies.
    Preparation time. 30 minutes.

    Ingredients
    2 cups prepared yellow mustard
    2/3 cup cider vinegar
    3 tablespoons tomato paste
    1/2 teaspoon chipotle Tabasco sauce or you favorite hot sauce
    3/4 cup sugar
    2 teaspoons chicken bouillon granules or 1 cube
    2 teaspoons dried rosemary leaves
    1 teaspoon celery seed
    3 teaspoons mustard powder
    2 teaspoons onion powder
    2 teaspoons garlic powder
    1 teaspoon table salt
    1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

    About the mustard. To be authentic, use yellow ballpark style mustard, not Dijon. Besides, it just doesn't taste right with Dijon.

    About the tomato paste. You can substitute ketchup if you wish.

    Do this
    1) Mix the wet ingredients together in a bowl.

    2) If you are using a bouillon cube, crush it with a spoon in a bowl or mortar & pestle and add it to the bowl. Crush the rosemary leaves and celery seed in a mortar & pestle or in a blender or coffee grinder and add it to the bowl. Add the rest of the dry ingredients to the bowl and mix thoroughly. Let it sit for a an hour in the refrigerator for the flavors to meld. No cooking necessary. Leftovers will keep in the fridge for a month or more.

    http://amazingribs.com/recipes/BBQ_sauces/south_carolina_mustard_BBQ_sauce.html
     
  41. RockyHa

    RockyHa Tracker

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    Baked Peas

    When I was a kid baked bean suppers were common around here and always included baked peas. Unfortunately I never found anyone that used a recipe so I will add this as a starting point if anyone is interested in trying them.

    1# of whole dry yellow peas (cleaned and rinsed)
    Medium diced onion
    about a level tsp. salt
    1 Heaping Tbs. brown sugar
    1/4 to 1/2 salt pork sliced about 1/4" thick

    add to bean pot in order listed, add water to cover an inch or so and bake then till soft like baked beans keeping just covered with hot water

    remove cover from bean pot turn up oven and brown.

    Good served with cornbread or biscuits and coleslaw
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2013
  42. CactusBob

    CactusBob Scout

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    I believe this is the same recipe my Mom used. It came from a friend of the family. Growing up in NH this was a normal dish at Church Socials and Pot Lucks

    Bob
     
  43. Crazysanman

    Crazysanman Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass II

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    This is a recipe from my grandmother for ANZAC biscuits. ANZAC is the Australia/New Zealand Army Corps. In WWII this recipe was published all over Australia and women would bake these cookies and bring them to collection sites where they would be shipped off to the troops. The cookies are crispy, pack well, and last a very long time (weeks to months) without spoiling or going stale.

    This recipe says it will make about five dozen cookies. I got about 18 large cookies when I made it. YMMV.

    1/2 cup butter
    1 tablespoon Golden Syrup
    1/2 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda (baking soda)
    2 tablespoons boiling water
    1 cup uncooked rolled oats
    1 cup dessicated coconut
    1 cup plain flour
    1 cup brown sugar
    2 teaspoons ginger

    Melt the butter and golden syrup in a large pan over a low heat. Add baking soda mixed with boiling water.

    Combine dry ingredients in a large mixing bowl, then pour the melted mixture in to the center of the bowl and mix to a moist but firm consistency.

    Drop slightly rounded teaspoonfuls of the mixture on to a cold greased cookie sheet. Cook for about 15 minutes in a moderate oven. Cool on a wire rack.

    You can find Lyle's Golden Syrup in most grocery stores in the baking section. If you can't find it, you could substitute pancake syrup, but it's not really the same. Dessicated coconut is dried coconut. I couldn't find it so I used normal shredded coconut and it turned out OK.
     
  44. freebirdfb

    freebirdfb Supporter Supporter

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    Cowboy Soup

    This is my wife's family recipe. Cook in crock pot (but I like to use my dutch oven) feeds several.

    30oz can Veg All
    10oz can Rotel Tomatoes
    1 package of skillet made Spanish Rice
    1 lbs Hamburger

    Place vegall and tomatoes (include liquids to form broth) in pot and start warming.
    Prepare Spanish Rice and cook hamburger and then add to veggies.
    Cook on low to medium until tomatoes are cooked.
     
  45. gijills

    gijills Tracker

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    Ranch Beans

    This is a new old family recipe

    I bought a old cast iron bean pot a year ago and it was rough but after I cleaned it up cast into the bottom was a recipe for beans and it is as follows:
    Blazing Saddle Beans
    2 lbs bean I use pintos
    1/2 cup Corn suryp
    1/2 cup sugar
    1 Lb pork (i use cut up bacon)
    1 small onion
    a bit of water but not much

    I also add 1/2 cup brown sugar
    garlic to taste

    bring to a boil then simmer till it all thickens up and you have to eat it because it smells too good.
     
  46. freebirdfb

    freebirdfb Supporter Supporter

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    My Momma's Banana Bread

    1 Box Yellow Cake Mix
    1 Box Instant Banana Cream Pudding
    2-3 Ripe Banans
    Water eggs etc needed as described on cake box

    Preheat Oven 350 (unless cake box directs otherwise)
    Mix cake as directed
    Add puddingmix mix well
    Add Bananas

    Put in loaf pans
    Bake 45 minutes to an hour
     
  47. Shnick

    Shnick Bushwhacker Bushclass II

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    I am SO gonna try this... Thanks!
     
  48. freebirdfb

    freebirdfb Supporter Supporter

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    Just remember that this is actually a cake so do not overmix. This is almost a full proof way of having a moist banana bread.
     
  49. Shnick

    Shnick Bushwhacker Bushclass II

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    Here's a recipe I found in one of grandma's really old cookbooks.

    Grilled Apple and Cranberry Stuffed Pork Loin
    For a 2 1/2 lb. Pork Loin

    Stuffing:
    1 Cup Apple Cider
    1/2 Cup Cider Vinegar
    3/4 Cup Brown Sugar (packed)
    2 medium Shallots, (cut lengthwise then sliced thin crosswise)
    1.5 Cups Granny Smith Apples, diced 1/2"
    1/2 Cup Cranberries (fresh or canned)
    1 Tbsp grated ginger
    1 Tbsp Mustard Seed
    1/2 tspn Allspice
    1/4 tspn ground Cayenne Powder

    Fillet Pork Loin in a spiral manner. Freeze for 45 minutes to assist cutting.
    Flatten thick spots with a meat tenderizer if needed.
    [​IMG]
    Combine all ingredients in a saucepan and cook on low until the apples are tender.
    [​IMG]
    Push mixture through a mesh and save both liquids and solids.
    [​IMG]
    Return liquid to saucepan and cook on low until slightly thickened.
    Pour apple solids onto split pork loin. Add additional spices if desired.
    Spread evenly and roll pork loin tightly.
    Tie up using 100%cotton line.
    [​IMG]
    Let sit overnight.
    [​IMG]


    Tomorrow is Part two.
     
  50. Jean

    Jean Guide

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    I want to try a recipe for a dutch oven that would cook slow in the campfire ashes at home first. Any idea on what temperature to set the oven to mimic a banked fire?
     

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