tree blaze & trail/property marker guide?

Discussion in 'Other Skills' started by alukban, Jan 22, 2017.

  1. alukban

    alukban Guide

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    Is there a definitive reference available regarding how to interpret tree blazse and trail/property markers?

    There are bits and pieces of information available but not a single, all-encompassing guide. Maybe we need a sticky to collect all this information on BCUSA.

    For example, what do the various indian trail trees mean?

    Also, in my state of Connecticut, what do 3 blazes on top of each other (as opposed to just the yellow band or the yellow band + one blaze) that mark the boundary of State forest mean (see image below)?

    [​IMG]

    PS. I got a tick buried in my neck last night as a reminder from nature after a deer scouting escapade in yesterday's glorious 52° weather :(
     
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  2. MrFixIt

    MrFixIt Old Jarhead Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Check with an older surveyor in your area, they could possibly help.
    And if you do, please post your finding!
     
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  3. RavenLoon

    RavenLoon axology student Supporter

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    Research projects would be another activity that would have different tree marks. That looks like some kind of witness tree to the pipe corner but I've never seen one painted like that. Original witness trees in the 1785 general survey the blazes were one at the base and one at 4 foot facing the corner, three or four total, with scribing on the blaze face. Connecticut was earlier metes and bounds system so may not be a standard there.
     
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  4. hdlv

    hdlv Supporter Supporter

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    If I remember correctly 3 on top of each other is a forestry service property marker. I think it is used to mark a corner. Or I'm totally wrong and is a reference tree or witness tree (not like a circle war witness tree) but one that a forester follows a gps to before starting a survey.

    I know I learned this one last summer but the memorie is a little blurry and my googlfu is proving inadequate.
     
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  5. alukban

    alukban Guide

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    You may be right on that "reference tree" thing. Thanks!

    There is a pin right beside that tree (definitely not a corner) so it probably does indicate a reference point nearby (i.e. the pin).
     
  6. Ghill

    Ghill Tinder Gatherer

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    When i had my properity surveyed here in pa.The tree nearest the orignal corner pins was blazed three times (From the orignal survey)and they tied a ribbon above so it could be seen from all directions. The blazes was facing the direction the corner turned.Single blazes was straight properity lines.Thats what they told me. I didnt do any research to see if was right or wrong ,just went with it.
     
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  7. Forestree

    Forestree Scout Bushclass I Bushclass II

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  8. Seeker

    Seeker Woods Bum Supporter Bushclass I

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    Love it Forestree... "Paint shall be neatly applied"... so sad that you have to spell that out for a contractor.
     
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  9. remington79

    remington79 Scout

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    When I used to survey in Texas there were a variety of ways you would find blazes. I'm not sure how along they started the new standard but we would find older bearing trees that had scarred over.

    For a property corner we would stand on the corner and take a bearing to a tree. Then that tree would have an X chopped into it. Just enough to remove the bark and puncture it a little so it would scar over. The center of the X is pointing at the corner. Then we would hit the the tree with our machetes putting 3 horizontal lines above and below the X. After the tree scars over you can still clearly see the markings. In addition to taking and recording the bearing we would also measure the distance to the tree, the DBH (diameter at breast height. It's a forestry term and is roughly 4 feet above the ground.) and the type of tree. The minimum would be 2 trees but we made it a point to use 3 trees or other permanent objects.

    If the corner was somewhere in a tree (they grow) we would set witness corners. From what I've seen USFS land uses red paint and has red bands and a plate on the tree. I'll post pictures of that.

    When I lived in CT the white blazes are the Appalachian Trail and the blue blazes were for the Blue Trails. I don't know if they have another name but we always called them blue trails. If you see a rectangle or two above each other it shows you are on the trail. If you see a rectangle (will be paint) and the rectangle on top being off set it means that another trail goes off in that direction. These are usually found at trail intersections.
     
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  10. remington79

    remington79 Scout

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    Here are the pictures I took of a USFS corner.
     

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  11. remington79

    remington79 Scout

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    Traverse points would be recorded the same way as corners but instead of an X and hack marks we would scrap away a little of the bottom of the tree pointed towards the traverse point and then put a hack in it and put a piece of flagging in it. This was called a toe blaze.

    One of my friends surveyed a little in CT and he found corners from the 1700s that were holes drilled in rocks and they were still on after all those years.
     
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  12. Carver 83

    Carver 83 Tinder Gatherer

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    The standard trail blaze for the old U.S. Forest Service was a top bark blaze two to four inches wide, two inches long over a bottom bark blaze that was two to four inches wide by eight inches long. The tree was blazed on both sides.
     
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