What's the top 5 compass ?

Discussion in 'Other Skills' started by Bassic, Dec 8, 2016.

  1. Bassic

    Bassic Supporter Supporter

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    IMG_1012.JPG Hi I'm "Bassic" and don't know how to use a compass!

    Of course I know basic stuff, look for the sun if it's not cloudy but if you give a map and a compass I would have trouble trying to figure it out most likely not be able to get to the location.

    I been relaying on land marks, technology, and marking the trail that's how I get around.

    To be honest I haven't put any effort to learn it ---> BAM Goal for the new year.

    With that said do I need to spend lots of $$ on a expensive compass ?

    Which one will you recommend i know it's not such a thing as the prefect one so what's your top 5 picks ?

    And or if you have any links or videos you can recommend even books info will be appreciated

    Thank you!
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2016
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  2. chasntuna

    chasntuna Scout

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  3. x39

    x39 Guide

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  4. Pastor Chris

    Pastor Chris Hardwoodsman Hobbyist Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass II

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  5. Gizamo

    Gizamo Banned Member Banned

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    What Chris said. Best bang for the buck.
     
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  6. DomC

    DomC Retired Old Scrub Stomper

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    I own four, a Brunton OSS-30, Silva Guide, Suunto A-10, and Cammenga model 27. All work great except the Brunton has developed a huge bubble. Still works nonetheless.

    Dom
     
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  7. DuctTape

    DuctTape Scout

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    Yeah, a simple compass need not be expensive. I have always been a fan of my old silva compasses, but I have heard that their quality might be questionable nowadays. Anyway, a simple orienteering baseplate compass is all that is needed. When used in conjunction with a map (orient to magnetic north and one nevers needs to worry about declination) and your already honed land nav skills, you will be fine. In general I use land nav most often with the compass to set my general bearing only.
     
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  8. Medic17

    Medic17 Supporter Supporter

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    I like plate compasses.
    Suunto, Brunton, and maybe Silva as long as they are not made in China.
    You have to check each model.

    Silva Explorer used to be awesome but they moved the production and its not the same.
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2016
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  9. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    Brunton Pocket Transit ( heavy, expensive, and very very good); Suunto A-10; Cammenga M27; Suunto MC2G;Suunto M9 Wrist model.

    Variety of prices and weights, all are very reliable, choose what fits your needs.
     
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  10. x39

    x39 Guide

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  11. hillst1

    hillst1 Supporter Supporter

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    I have a Suunto MC2G. Highly recommend it.
     
  12. 2jka

    2jka Scout

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    Cammenga M27 here.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  13. 2jka

    2jka Scout

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    I like the looks of the Suunto wrist compass as well, but I don't own one.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  14. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    I got one, very light weight and easily worn. Not as versatile as a baseplate compass, but so easy to make quick bearing check. I have only had it a year, so no real durability judgment yet.
     
  15. marbleman

    marbleman Scout

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    Here's an easy pacing/compass practice, that can help orienteering skills greatly. Drop something in the yard for a mark. Get your compass, and walk 10 steps from it due north. Then walk 10 steps due east (90 degrees). Then walk 10 steps due south (180 degrees). Continue to the west (270 degrees). You will be back at your mark, you are just walking in a square. Look at the compass, not the mark, it's easy to cheat.

    Go somewhere large enough, then double, then triple the amount of steps each time.For longer distances, sight a bearing initially (rock/tree/sign/whatever) then count your paces while looking at that.

    The next phase, instead of due north, try 10 degrees off north, and bump each reading up by 10 degrees. Then again with 15 degrees. Lather, rinse, repeat!
     
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  16. SniperSurvivalist

    SniperSurvivalist Supporter Supporter

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    Well i was gonna ask how is the Brunton TruArc3 baseplate compass is only 10 dollars . or should i go a little more and get the Suunto A-10?
     
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  17. 2jka

    2jka Scout

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    I have found that, with compasses, your first 80% of functionality is payed for with your first $10 dollars. Most compasses will point north enough. The problem is that while an 80% compass can work for general directional judgment, if you try to acquire real bearings or shoot actual azimuths, an inaccuracy of 1% can get you really lost if you don't know what you are doing and you aren't careful. After about $20-30 you are really just paying for durability, features or both.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2016
  18. Blackhawk45hunter

    Blackhawk45hunter Pronounced sim-bee-duh Vendor Supporter Bushclass II

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    cammenga M27 or H3!
     
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  19. postman

    postman Scout Bushclass I

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    I use a Silva Ranger, had it for about 5 years, works great. All of the major manufacturers make good quality compasses, Suunto, Brunton or Silva, can't go wrong with any of them.
     
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  20. DarrylM

    DarrylM Scout

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    How do you compensate for lateral drift when encountering obstacles? that can be a greater margin of error than caused by a cheap compass
     
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  21. marbleman

    marbleman Scout

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    If you have a solid bearing initially, you can walk around it (in 3/4 of a square, counting paces) and continue on the original bearing.
     
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  22. Billswfl

    Billswfl Supporter Supporter

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    I have a Suunto MC-2DLIN and an older Silva Huntsman I picked up in the 70s. Suunto A-10 or A-30 are great compasses for the price.

    Bill
     
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  23. Patriot Bushcraft

    Patriot Bushcraft The Environmentalist Supporter

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    I own and my vote goes to silva ranger and a military lensatic compass.
     
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  24. tennecedar

    tennecedar Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    Silva Ranger is my favorite.
     
  25. Usingmyrights

    Usingmyrights Supporter Supporter

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    You can also do a 45* 90* and another 45*
     
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  26. x39

    x39 Guide

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    This is a fairly common issue, and Marbleman described an effective method for dealing with larger obstructions to travel such as swamps, mountains, etc. Drift can also occur when moving over heavily wooded or uneven terrain, where we encounter many smaller obstructions in going around trees, etc. One way of compensating for this is to offset the direction of travel a bit so that we are building in a deliberate error favoring one direction. For example, let's say we want to travel to a lake that lies directly west of us. We note on the map that there is a stream flowing from the south end of the lake. We would normally set a bearing of 270 degrees to travel directly to the lake, but if we drift from our bearing travelling through the woods, we might go north of the lake and miss it. We decide instead to set our bearing a few degrees further south, say to 268 degrees, so that we'll hit the stream south of the lake, then all we have to do is follow it upstream. This is also a good method to use to get back to where you parked your vehicle on a woods road, ensuring that you come out of the woods on to the road in a known direction from the vehicle. Hope this helps.
     
  27. feellnfroggy

    feellnfroggy Guide

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    Get a quality compass, not expensive. They dying always run together. Then go to topo maps. Com I think and download a map. Then go play. You learn as you go. And we can answer specific questions.

    Don't "go play" in a manner that your life depends on. It's too late for questions by then.
     
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  28. x39

    x39 Guide

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    Good advice, though I might add when you do "go play", do it in a patch of woods that's easy to navigate out of, like with a road along one or more edges that following a simple bearing will get you to if you get confused. Large open areas are good too, as you can relate the landscape features to what you're seeing on the map.
     
  29. perrymk

    perrymk Supporter Supporter

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    I was taught the same technique is also useful to compensate for personal bias. That is, right handed people tend to veer right, left handed people tend to veer left. So if you are right handed, aim for a spot to the right to your target. Because both your bias and your aim is to the right, you can be fairly assured your target is to your left. I've used this basic technique to find my car parked along a road while I hiking through the woods.
     
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  30. Winterhorse

    Winterhorse Supporter Supporter

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    Go to Wallyworld.
    Buy cheap compass
    Buy book (Like, Be Expert with Map and Compass)
    Get a map (even a road map)
    Learn what a map has to say and how it says it
    Learn what the compass has to say about the map
    After you learn the basics which doesn't really take long at all then you can do like I do and obsess about compass's and their various features to your hearts content.

    I personally EDC an old WWll pocket watch compass that will get me to approximately any place I want to go.
     
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  31. Kynoch

    Kynoch Tracker

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    I use a Suunto MC-2 and it it quite nice.
     
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  32. marbleman

    marbleman Scout

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  33. 2jka

    2jka Scout

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    While I seldom actually do any true orienteering, mostly dead reckoning and topography reading, pace counting is a useful skill to have. Ranger/pace beads can be very useful in helping to keep track of your paces.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  34. feellnfroggy

    feellnfroggy Guide

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    I have a book on hunting by topo, where you can use terrain features of a map to identify deer locations before ever setting foot in the territory you want to investigate. Kinda like the first step in process of elimination for multiple choice. There are always 2 answer that are so wrong no one will choose them. These would be the choices that match places you wont find deer at all and you can eliminate them before ever going out. I don't remember the name of it, but I'll get an image of it tonight and post it.
     
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  35. x39

    x39 Guide

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    I'd be very interested in that. One of the most successful deer hunters I know uses that method.
     
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  36. SniperSurvivalist

    SniperSurvivalist Supporter Supporter

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    I agree too by the way where do you guys buy topo maps at i haven't found any in the store.
     
  37. marbleman

    marbleman Scout

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  38. Chili

    Chili Supporter Supporter

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    Same experience I have had after owning mine for a year, as well.

    I have one of these too, and I like it. The mirror is a nice addition and gives it uses beyond direction finding.
     
  39. SniperSurvivalist

    SniperSurvivalist Supporter Supporter

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  40. marbleman

    marbleman Scout

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    Yes, they are .PDFs, can be fairly large, 30 meg or so. You have a choice of resolutions. Grab several! When they say 'cart', that's just what you have queued to download. If you have a tablet/phone/whatever that you trust to not die while you're out, that can be convenient. Otherwise, you could print and laminate.
     
  41. feellnfroggy

    feellnfroggy Guide

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    Unless you do options like laminating.
     
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  42. aaronu

    aaronu Armchair Bushcrafter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    And/or carry in a Lucky 1-2 map case... they are pretty awesome.

    Started out with a Silva Starter 1-2-3 and then upgraded to a Suunto MCA in the mid 80's. The Suunto works fine after 30 years and I see no reason to change it. The little green man in my computer tells me the new version is the MC2, and that it is on Amazon for $45. My older one was $49.95 from a local sporting goods store some time around 1987.

    The Lucky 1-2 case, compass, maps and a waterproof pen are my manually operated GPS. I don't have one of them battery GPS things.

    For a starter option I got my kids Brunton TruArc 3 for their camping/survival gear. That's a straightforward baseplate compass that works well, is USA made, and so far has held up to typical "kid abuse". It's a bit large to carry on a neck lanyard (for a kid any way) but has no rough edges or sharp corners.
     
  43. Billswfl

    Billswfl Supporter Supporter

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    Here's a pretty good youtube video on downloading maps from USGS. He covers a lot of information that will help you get everything you need to print or have a print shop do it. His other videos on compass and maps are good also.

     
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  44. bam7765

    bam7765 Tracker

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  45. x39

    x39 Guide

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    I think you'll find it's worth every penny of that, LOL!
     
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  46. brokenotbroken

    brokenotbroken Tracker

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    Compass: Suunto M-3 G, if you want a great compass and don't mind shelling out the money. If you don't want a great compass, honestly anything for a couple of bucks will do. It comes down to knowing where north is and being able to read a map. So what if you're 3-6 degrees off. If you can read a map and have a semi-accurate compass you'll get to where you're going. If you're doing extreme navigation, you'll want a good one. To play in the woods, pick up something cheap.

    Books: Wilderness Navigation by Bob Burns. Or just check online. There are plenty of instructions and youtube videos.

    Online & printable maps: Sartopo.com

    Learning how to use it all? Find out if there are local orienteering clubs, orienteering races, or adventure races and then get out there. Navigation with map and compass is awesome. Have fun!
     
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  47. Bassic

    Bassic Supporter Supporter

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    Great information thank you so much for all the input!

    Talking to my coworker He also refer me to counting steps as well the step counter I like the idea he said the one he has has 16 bids and every one moves after you make 64 steps just counting the steps on the same leg so when you finish the 16 will equal to 1 mile (+-)
     
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  48. wwang

    wwang Scout

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  49. x39

    x39 Guide

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    Last edited: Dec 10, 2016
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  50. Bassic

    Bassic Supporter Supporter

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    Hi just wondering if you have the name of the book ! sounds very interesting
     

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