Wool vs Fleece

Discussion in 'Clothing' started by Friartuck, Feb 25, 2011.

  1. Friartuck

    Friartuck Guide

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    Was wondering if anyone had any opinions on the benefits of one type of fabric over the next. Specifically I'm planning on building a sleep system and clothing layers for next winter slowly as things go on the end-of-season sale racks. At Goodwill today I saw throw sized fleece blankets for $2 in various colors which I would stitch together for an anorak and sleeping bag liner. I'm trying to decide if I'd be better off going with the wool blankets for 20+ dollars each or the cheaper and more readily available fleece clothing.

    If you can speak from experience about this issue I'd sure like to hear what you have to say. I'm really concerned with warmth comparisons as well as sweat wicking properties, which is better when it gets wet, breathability, etc.
     
  2. SluggySlugworth

    SluggySlugworth Scout

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    I know wool insulates 80% of its capabilities even when soaking wet. If im correct no other fabric, whether natural or man made can claim such a feat. Also wool is fire resistant and odor resistant. However, some wools can be itchy! And wool is heavy, I think mil spec wool blankets weigh in around 5 pounds, which is more then my tent... Im quite curious as to the benefits of fleece.
     
  3. idahoelkhunter

    idahoelkhunter Scout

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    I was a diehard wool guy a few years ago. Filson coat, LL Bean (I think) pants, and wool cap. I have gone almost 100% fleece. I still wear wool socks :3:

    As mentioned wool is HEAVY! But you cannot find a more rugged material.

    Polar fleece seems to have the same wet properties as wool in my experience and is oh so light. However... An ember from the fire can put a hole in your jacket quicker than you can say, "Oh crap."

    If I had to pick one set of garments to homestead in the Northwest Territories, it would be wool. If I am hiking and hunting and am never further than a few days from a town, I'd pick poly fleece.
     
  4. Independent

    Independent Scout

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    For me the issue is exceedingly simple. I'm allergic to most wools, and quite allergic to molds, which many older wools harbor. Give me lightweight poly fleece that I can throw in the washing machine and I'm a happy camper.

    However, I think idahoelkhunter makes a good point about the relative ruggedness and comparative durability. Wool has been around for a very long time and there's a good reason for that. My most cold weather hat is 100% wool felt from a very ancient design. One thing not yet mentioned is that wool felt has wind resistance that unlined fleece can't match.
     
  5. grnmtn

    grnmtn Tracker

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    i much prefer wool to fleece and in fact have gotten rid of all the fleece i used to own. i like the durability and the fact that it's a natural fiber. i still have a couple watch caps that are synthetic, but in time those will be replaced as well.

    for an anorak, i plan to make one from wool. as an outer garment the durability comes into play as does the fire resistance.

    for a bag liner, i still would go with wool. fleece makes me feel clammy when it's next to my skin and i think wool does a better job of wicking. soft, high quality wool would be preferred for a bag liner if you sleep wearing less than a base layer.
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2011
  6. FarPoint

    FarPoint Tracker

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    There is nothing comfier than soft wool. In cold weather it is Merino wool base layers all the way. I actually find pure, tight weave wool sweaters too warm and I tend to use a fleece mid layer so I can undo the pit zips and cool off a little quicker.
    I always find that fleece feels awesome when I first put it on but in short order it seems to get clammy or uncomfortable. I always use some sort of wind-proof outer shell over whatever I am wearing so the spark issue is a bit of a non-starter but wool definitely holds up better but is a pain to wash properly.
    Wool next to the skin though-always.

    FarPoint
    -all those who wander are not lost-
     
  7. cloudraker

    cloudraker Guide

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    I'm wearing a wool sweater writing this. I really like it the refective warmth of wool, but I have to wear a silk or nylon layer underneath - I can't stand wool next to my skin.
    I'm like idahoelkhunter - I wear wool around the camp and on short hikes or still hunting It is heavy and bulky, and takes forever to dry when really wet. For longer trips I take feece, lifa, and gortex. I prefer the lighter weight and breathability of feece on longer trips. Also it dries out very fast in a wind. And yes I do have to be carefull around fires, but that it manageable.
     
  8. wsdstan

    wsdstan Guide

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    I use wool and fleece, sometimes in combination depending on the weather. Wool probably insulates better given equal weights.

    I do have a 300 weight fleece jacket that, if worn under a wind proof cotton or nylon parka, is a very warm insulator.

    For a sleeping system I think a fleece liner inside a conventional sleeping bag offers good warmth but not as good as a wool blanket. The fleece is easier to care for.
     
  9. solocanoe

    solocanoe Bushmaster

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    if you want bombproof - you want wool - as real as you can get it.

    mainly it's fires that screw up fleece, but even snags and 'pulls' can mess up fleece.

    I like fleece - but my fleece is for 'city use only'.
     
  10. Mighty Joe

    Mighty Joe Tracker

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    i used to ride during the winter with wool shirts under my jacket, i came across a fleece pullover a few years ago and tried it out. it was much lighter, alot less bulky and i stayed warm all day i rode that long. i now have a pair of fleece pants i wear under my jeans too and the only thing that stops me from riding my bike is snow, hard to keep it up in zero traction. this may seem off topic but i'm talking about riding at 60 and 70 mph in 20 degree weather, if that's not a test i don't know what is. hope this helps.
     
  11. Cro

    Cro American Grouch Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I Bushclass Instructor

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    I use a mix of both. All outer layers are generally wool. I wear fleece under it and then a base layer, non-cotton.

    Around fires it's wool though I do have some fleece that is so pocked marked now it doesn't matter.

    I've found the mix of the two is a nice fit for me. If'n I'm humpin or heavy work it's nice to shed the wool, fleece works well in this regard.
     
  12. santaman2000

    santaman2000 Guide

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    I like wool but you've heard the endorsements for both so I'm gonna throw in another curve. Have you thought about Alpaca wool? I don't have any 1st hand knowledge but from my research it's from 3-5 times warmer than sheeps wool for the same weight. It's also more expensive. Does anybody have any 1st hand experience to share?

    Back to your question though. I'd go with wool. But I'm not sure why use a sleeping bag liner of any kind.
     
  13. HoosierArcher

    HoosierArcher Banned Member Banned

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    In a sleep system I would use both. two medium weight wool blankets on the outside and two light weight fleece sheets next to the skin for chilly weather and all heavy for really frigid weather. I'll warn you however that wool and fleece really make a lot of static electricity rubbing together. But In my un heated bedroom I sleep with a fleece blanket under an alpaca wool blanket down to 34 degrees F lower than that I add my 5 point Hudson bay folded over on top of that. It's heavy but cozy warm. I also wear a light weight alpaca chullo or a fleece toque as a nightcap in milder temps and a thicker alpace chullo over the light one in colder temps. Alpaca wool is warmer for the weight but wind penetrates it worse unless it is a tight weave like in a blanket. You can find deals on alpaca wool.
    You can also use lighter blankets if you wear good merino wool long underwear, like Ulfrotte aka Woolpower, as pajamas.
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2011
  14. Fishrarr

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    I like a mix of both wool and fleece. If I am doing heavy work, wool for sure works, for the under layers. If I am not doing much movement then it's fleece with some type of jacket or pants to cut the wind. Fleece is much lighter and I find more comfortable for sitting in a boat for hours in the wind and wet with windbreaker and warm up pants. I also find that a fleece liner in a sleeping bag makes a big difference on a cold fall mountain lake camp. I also find that fleece does not seem to crush under your weight in while laying on it. It keeps it's loft so it's warmer. I am a cold sleeper so I notice a difference for sure. Tom.
     
  15. wsdstan

    wsdstan Guide

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    My only first hand experience with Alpaca is a pair of glommits. Alpaca is a lot more fragile that regular sheep wool and, in my limited experience, not nearly as warm. Soft though.
     
  16. mangywhitebushman

    mangywhitebushman Scout

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    I'm a go between. Wool is heavier, but does a great job, fleece is great too, depends on what i'm going. I'm currently testing alpaca. It has no guard hairs, no itchyness, and from what these people are telling me it's better then wool. I have to assume they would upsell the alpaca to wool though since they have alpaca's. The trick is finding someone to hand make you stuff.
     
  17. ninac15

    ninac15 Tinder Gatherer

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    Wool a warm versatile fabric compared with Fleece a warm soft fabric. Though both fabrics keep you warm and dry.
     
  18. rockett88s

    rockett88s Scout

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    Boonies.... wool

    Combat zone... wool

    Close to civilization... wool and fleece

    Long motorcycle rides at 20 degrees... ??? ( I stay home by the wood stove!)
     
  19. mainewoods

    mainewoods Maine Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    I wear both (more wool) I like fleece under rain gear (spring time) I have a LL Bean "Windbloc fleece" But "Fires" don't like it LOL I have burn spots all over the place from sparks :(
     
  20. Ravaillac

    Ravaillac Tinder Gatherer

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    I use to wear several layers of wool as insulation. It worked ok but I've quickly realized that:
    * they are rugged but not insanely better than polartec
    * they are more fire resistant, but the fire-synthetics problem is often overstated in my opinion
    * they are great at managing sweat and body odors (better than any synthetics I know including silver-ion treated synthetics like Odlo or Patagonia)
    * the bulk/insulation ratio isn't great
    * they are slow to dry

    Pros for synthetics:
    * much better insulation/weight ratio
    * won't absorb much water, dries very fast
    Cons:
    * less harwearing
    * less fire resistant (like not at all)
    * start "stinking" pretty quickly

    Based on that I've modified my layer system to include synthetics.
    Now my winter system is:
    * synthetic sanitation/close to body layer (Odlo "light" or cheap polyester shirt)->wicks moisture away from the slin
    * thin wool pullover (Woolpower 200g)
    * reinforcement layer 1 (Polartec Prothermal Jacket)- put on remove depending on activity
    * reinforcement layer 2 (Polartec Prothermal Jacket)- put on remove depending on activity
    * hardshell (either goretex or -distantly related to- Ventile fabric)
    * synthetic fill parka- (put on when not active)

    Best of both worlds, at least I hope.
     
  21. lonelake

    lonelake Scout

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    Mostly wool, I have a few fleece items, but have turned more towards the traditional fabrics. Wool, Canvas, and Leather!


    LL
     
  22. The Warning

    The Warning Scout

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    I like layering up on fleece. It allows more versatility for the same weight. But I haven't solved the fire issue. I was thinking a protective shell layer. Is it possible to treat a canvas anorak to be water repellent and flame retardent? Maybe I could treat it with a solution of borax, allow it to dry, then waterproof it with the linseed oil/beeswax method.
     
  23. Pinebaron

    Pinebaron Guide

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    I like fleece, used to wear a lot of wool. Fleece is warm when wet (took an unexpected dip in a cold river), drys faster, lightweight, easy to care for (come home ,take it off and throw it in the washer), doesn't shrink, compresses better, and is a lot cheaper than wool.

    Since fleece is an insulation layer, I generally wear it underneath something like a British smock BDU jacket, or goretex parka. As I get warm I take off the insulating layers (to help keep them dry) and leave the outer layer on. Ounce for ounce fleece is warmer than wool. However fleece is more breathable than wool hence windy (unless you buy the windproof stuff) so a windproof layer is often necessary over the top of it such as a smock, BDU jacket, or goretex parka which I wear anyhow.

    Fleece is cheap enough now that if you do get too many burn holes in it you just replace it. Not counting the dry cleaning bills for wool, you can buy 2 or 3 fleece items for one wool.
     
  24. Sgt. Mac

    Sgt. Mac Elder Staff Member Administrator Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II Bushclass Instructor

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    Wool for previous mentioned reasons. Fleece burns too easy
     
  25. Square Peg

    Square Peg Tracker

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    You might as well have asked, "who makes the best pickup?" There are definitely strong opinions for each. Both fabrics have pluses and minuses. I'm a 100% wool guy. It's not affected by sparks, extremely durable and traditional, which is important to me. I don't mind the weight. Maybe the best feature of wool is that it doesn't smell after wearing it for a few days in the bush.
    Good luck with your choice.
     
  26. Friartuck

    Friartuck Guide

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    I actually wanted to make an outer sleeping bag for my self made sleep system. The idea is to take a sleeping bag rated for 30 degrees and add insulation so I can camp at 0 degrees and I don't want to buy an mil-spec ECWS bag set.

    That's why I love to ask hard questions, you get lost of great answers. For example, I had no idea that wool didn't stink after days of wear, great benefit.

    Thanks for the input guys. I'm thinking that with my budget fleece is more in line with the pocket book but I'll not be shunning wool like I used to. Ultimately, I'm thinking a mixture would be best.
     
  27. DirtNap

    DirtNap Scout

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    I picked up this heavy wool sweater when pillaging in Canada. It's made by a company called Laundry Mat and is lined with fleece on the inside for much comfort. And note that I look a damn shade better in it than this headless mannequin :)

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2011
  28. Cascade Man

    Cascade Man Scout

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    I have an alpaca sweater. It's TOO hot!. The only time I use it is for sleeping while in camp when there is snow, which has only been once. There have been a few days that I have worn it outside when the weather here was below about 28-29 degrees F. Super toasty.
     
  29. bleeding.patriot

    bleeding.patriot Scout

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    Does anyone else find that synthetic fabrics trigger a sweat reaction? I started to discover this in Iraq while wearing acrylic socks but have since realized that all my synthetic insulation either causes excessive sweat or has too much moisture retention.

    It is for the above reasons that I've started transitioning to wool. I wish I didn't have to because it is so expensive but it feels much more "natural" on the skin and keeps me much drier. It doesn't stink like synthetics either.
     
  30. Pinebaron

    Pinebaron Guide

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    Not all synthetics are created equal. The ones you want are hydrophobic which means they will transport moisture from the inside to the outside (warmth from your body causes this). I use Thorlo combat socks which are 100% synthetic and never have a problem with them (I've worn wool for many years before that). What you might be witnessing is all the moisture moving to the outside of the sock trying to keep your feet dry.

    Fleece will allow moisture to pass through pretty easily. However, if you have a barrier on the outside (such as a BDU type jacket) then the moisture has no place to go. This will happen with any material. The solution is as you warm up you have to remove layers (or unzip/unbutton) to prevent your core from overheating and producing too much sweat. Fleece might be keeping you too warm, try lighter layers. Fleece under a windproof shell is very warm.

    The good thing about fleece and other synthetics is they are easy to care for. You can come in out of the woods strip in front of the washing machine throwing all your clothes in there and let it rip without worrying about it shrinking from an XL to an XS. A downside to wool is it does take special care.

    As far as smell, I don't have that problem with modern fabrics. Polypropylene can smell though. I haven't found that with the Polarguard fabrics. Some even come treated with some anti-bacterial stuff now.

    Good luck with your quest and I hope you find what works best for you.
     
  31. Leatherneck

    Leatherneck Tracker

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    Aside from Goretex for rain wear, I much prefer natural materials. I have a lot of high end gear in both wool and synthetics. I don't mind synthetics for a base layer, but I find fleece insulation rather obsolete now. For insulation I would rather have a thick wool shirt, or thick sweater (for winter use) as everyone knows they are harder wearing, flame resistant and quiet. I also find that wool keeps you warmer when wet or damp compared to fleece. If I'm not concerned with being quiet (not hunting, late winter) and not near fires, I would rather carry a synthetic fiber-type insulation like a Micropuff or Softie. These are great emegency gear anyways, as they stuff down to nothing, block wind, and insulate much better than anything other than down. I just don't see the need for your standard polar fleece anymore.
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2011
  32. Bjorno

    Bjorno Scout

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    I just got a hold of an Alpaca sweater at my local Salvation Army thrift shop, $1.50 and pretty damn warm.

    The problem is telling whether my Sheep's wool is warmer than the Alpaca because the weaves are different. This one is more of a designer style rather than a utilitarian style, so it is thicker in spots and thinner in others. It does hold heat rather well, and seems to have similar wicking properties.

    The Alpaca is much softer, and feels like it has an oil or something else on the fibers making it really smooth. Though, nothing rubs off on you while wearing it so it is probably just THAT smooth.

    But, according to Wikipedia, it says that Alpaca is indeed warmer than Sheep's wool.



    As far as the OP's question is concerned; fleece is nice for some occasions, wool is better for most.

    I'll usually pack a fleece or two on most outings, just because it is so light and compresses fairly well. But I will need to rely on my gear at some point, so Wool is a necessity.

    Heck, I wear wool socks almost year-round. Nice to have a Smartwool rep in the family.
     
  33. bleeding.patriot

    bleeding.patriot Scout

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    The socks that drove me nuts were Fox River boot socks that are sold at pretty much all the BX/PXs. I think they were 100% acrylic. The shame is that I bought a full set of new socks before the deployment but I started to feel like Pig-Pen from the Peanuts because my feet smelled so bad. I bought some wool boot socks from Darn Tough and they pretty much cured the problem.
     
  34. Pinebaron

    Pinebaron Guide

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    Glad you got it fixed.
     
  35. Moshe

    Moshe Tracker

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    Prefer Wool and Cotton blankets. They feel better and smell better.

    Not a fan of Fleece blankets. The friction of these against body hair turns me into a static generator and makes me paranoid about touching anything metallic. Also Fleece seem to stink up much faster than Wool or cotton.
     
  36. Strider

    Strider Scout

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    I like wool for all the aforementioned reasons, plus one that has not yet been stated. It is a natural product, and I am a nature baby. I absolutely can't abide plastic, and I love nature and all it's ramifications. Seems to me that going out to play on her breast is not a place to cart a bunch of synthetics and high tech stuff that had its origins in an oil well. For years I've wondered in head-shaking amazement at the way so many people assert a love of nature and outdoor life, then turn around and insulate themselves as much as possible from being close to her with synthetic clothing, shelter, tools and toys. Its just my own thing, but I like leather, carbon steel, wood, brass, cotton, wool, enamel ware, tin, and all the accoutrements of the old ways. I like to get into it, not away from it, and stuff like fleece makes me feel out and away instead of in and near. Besides, once you learn the way to use the traditional stuff, in most cases it works better.
     
  37. livetosurvive

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    I agree wool clothing is better for extended trips. However, I would have liked a more specific discussion of blankets. Last year when planning a late summer backpacking trip, I was thinking of taking two wool blankets, they rolled up small, but weighed 5 Lbs. My cheap polyester sleeping bag rolled up large, but weighed 5 Lbs. I really wanted to take the blankets, but I took the sleeping bag. Seems like a fleece blanket would trap more air and insulate better than a dense wool blanket.
     
  38. rg598

    rg598 Guest

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    For the weight and volume fleece insulates better. While I like wool, and I wear a wool coat in the city, it is just too heavy for backpacking. For the same weight you can bring a lot more fleece insulation. If we are talking about very cold temperatures, wool becomes impractical. Even Kephart talked about how during winter you put away the wool blankets and bring out the sleeping bag. If you go with fleece though, make sure you have a wind barrier, or use it on the inside of your sleeping bag. It is not as good as wool at keeping the wind out.

    I would agree with you if you actually relied on non-processed materials. More than half of the things you list however, contain just as much technology, and are just as removed from nature’s “breast” as any synthetic material. Let’s be fair, axes don’t grow on trees. In fact, you can’t even find iron in any workable state in nature. We spend massive amounts of technology and fossil fuels to extract and process it into the forms we see. I see no difference between mining for iron ore, smelting it with processed coal, reintroducing controlled quantities of carbon, from mining oil and extracting plastic from it. After all, products like asphalt and bitumen, which have been used by people for millennia are exactly that-an oil byproduct. For me, if I can’t make the item myself in the woods, then it is technology that I bring in just the same. All the things we have are provided by nature. I don’t see how brass or enamel ware are any more “natural” than fleece. Going back to nature, and using primitive technology is great, but we actually have to do that, not simply pick a random technological benchmark and then shake our head in amazement at people who have chosen a different but equally random technological benchmark.
     
  39. Strider

    Strider Scout

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    There is a difference between sleeping under a cotton tarp, clothed in natural fibres, cooking over a wood fire, etc. and zipping oneself into a nylon tent clothed in Goretex and polypropylene and cooking in a titanium pot over a battery operated gas stove.

    There just is. It's a state of mind.

    It's also a free world, and anyone is welcome to go out there all plasticed up spending one's evening with his nose in a computer game. God bless 'em. But to my mind, it's bringing city life and a closed-off, alienated and nature-wary attitude to the bush. That's just the way I see it. I know I'm part of a small minority, but it is a growing one, thankfully. I'll happily concede that it doesn't all "make sense" but then again it is supposedly rationality and logic that has brought the world to the state it's in now.
     
  40. rockett88s

    rockett88s Scout

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    The two best deals I found over in Iraq at the PX's were Duofold wool blend long johns and Wigwam 40 below wool blend boot sox... Though I wore both products for years before I went overseas, I found them in the PX at Ramadi for dirt cheap! I bought all I could!

    Wool and wool mblends simply work for me. They always have. I was first introduced to wearing wool in the winter of 1986 at the Marine Corps Mountain Warfare school up at Pickle Meadows, CA. Wool has been the cure to cold, wet feet, Trench Foot, and stinky Poly Pro's ever since...
     
  41. rg598

    rg598 Guest

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    Like I said, I agree with you in theory, I just don’t think all the examples that are being given support that theory. Certainly sleeping under a tree is very different from sleeping in a trailer that you towed to the woods. It’s a very different experience. I fully understand the enhanced connection to nature that results from using only tools that you can manufacture yourself in the woods. I envy people who have the skill to go into the bush with a flint knife and a buckskin coat that they made.

    That being said, I still don’t see the difference between brass and plastic, and how one brings a person closer to nature as opposed to the other one. Nor do I see why a steel pot is any less a representation of civilization than a titanium one. The canvas tarp you are using is probably produced in the factory next door to the factory that produces my plastic tarp (both located in the city), and the wool blanket is probably made by the same company that makes the fleece one. You seem to be bringing as much of the city into the woods with you as anyone else.

    We all have preferences when it comes to the materials we use, and there is nothing wrong with that. I just fail to see how one preference makes the connection to nature more profound, especially when one material is just as man made as the other. Shaking your head in disbelief at someone who is using a fleece blanket seems to make as much sense as shaking you head in disbelief at someone who likes the color blue. On the other had, if we chose to forego any attempt to make sense, then yes, we can just go back to the dark ages and be really, really close to nature.

    ...sorry for hijacking the thread guys.
     
  42. brionic

    brionic Blissful simpleton Supporter

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    Depends on the wool. The new thin merino wool blend garments are top notch and give away nothing in bulk or weight. On the flip side, some of the newer synthetics are equally amazing, and some of the older stuff is dreadful.

    I use and enjoy a blend of both, preferring thinner layers with the exception of blizzard busting chores.

    Two big advantages of wool - it is less prone to generating a a huge static shock in dry weather, and less prone to the general "holy cow is that me?" pungence after multiple days of use.

    For most of my camping, I prefer more wool, with a healthy balance of both in my pack. For my long distance cycling, wool is the hands down winner.
     
  43. Bill

    Bill Guide

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    I own both, but prefer fleece for its comfort. It is true that it only takes one little ember to make a burn mark in your fleece, but once it happens the first time you stop caring and then can just enjoy your shirt/pullover.

    It's like having a new truck. You want to keep it pretty, but you also want it to get that first scratch so you can just enjoy it without worrying :)
     
  44. ScottMescudi

    ScottMescudi Banned Member Banned

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    The sparks from my brothers angle grinder burnt a hole straight through onto his skin. The stuff sucks when it comes to heat an fire. I love the feel of it though. I've never owned wool, but two layers of fleece got me through many winter camps in boy scouts. I efinitely want to get a wool blanket though to see what everyones talking about.
     
  45. matt.s

    matt.s Guide

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    IMHO there is a more noticeable advantage to wool clothing over fleece than bedding/blankets.
     
  46. rogumpogum

    rogumpogum Guest

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    Unless you're like me who has a tent, cooks over his campfire in titanium pots, clothed in whatever I decide to wear, sleeping with either my poncho liner or a wool blanket depending upon what I grabbed... And reading books in front of the fire before it gets too dark to see.

    I travel light as I can. I tent camp. I'll tarp camp. I'll use state lean-to shelters. I'll make my own lean-to shelter. I'll use wool, I'll use fleece, I'll use a gore-tex bivy. I'll hike, fish, wander all day, or I'll just park myself in front of the fire and read a novel or write in my journal or doodle.

    Or, heck, if the mood strikes me... Play a game on my iphone.

    Either way, I'm still out there... I'm still enjoying being out there.
     
  47. 45jack

    45jack Supporter Supporter

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    A lot has been made of the fire retardant qualities of wool, and I agree wholeheartedly.
    However, wool is not fireproof, and a lot depends on the fire retardedness of the camper.
    If you squat down in front of the fire to warm your back, your brothers will continue to drink and laugh as you turn yourself into char cloth.
    [​IMG]
     
  48. Rockmonkey

    Rockmonkey Scout

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    The main advantages of fleece are weight and drying ability. Disadvantages as mentioned are temperamental to fire/heat, and snagging.
    Fleece does not absorb water. It is possible to immerse a fleece garment or blanket and with a couple of quick shakes it is mostly dry. Wool definitely has some wonderful properties also, insulation and durability to note. When wet it retains most of the insulation factor. But it does take a lot to dry it. IMO the choice between wool or fleece would depend on exactly what garment/equipment each would be used for and field testing to determine which is better. A good experience comes from good judgment learned from a bad experience that was the result of bad judgment.
     
  49. ScottMescudi

    ScottMescudi Banned Member Banned

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    I think I'm going to make a wool jacket lined with fleece with fleece pockets.
     
  50. Bravo Tango

    Bravo Tango Scout

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    I enjoy wool over fleece. Mainly because it is tried and true and it's a natural fabric. The weight is not an issue for me and honestly I don't find it to be a factor when considering the ruggedness of wool. I want something that will last.

    IMO if someone is worried about weight of their gear/equipment then they should get stronger.
     

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