Year long expedition?

Discussion in 'Trips & Expeditions' started by sasquatch, Jan 9, 2013.

  1. sasquatch

    sasquatch Scout

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    As I am currently a Freshman in college I want to try and plan a trip now (i.e. three to four years out) for a full 365 day trip out in the wilderness. Right now I need to figure out out how to finance it and what to bring. Right now I figure out what to bring. I know I will need supplies to build a cabin (chainsaw, hammer, nails, axe, hatchet, splitting wedges etc) and most certainly a months worth of MREs/ Freeze dried meals per person (in case of snow in or running out of food midwinter). I think I will want a 0 degree sleeping bag/ camping supplies while the cabin is built and probably a snow mobile in case midwinter supplies/ evac is needed. I don't plan on bringing alcohol as I think that will cause too many problems (drunken fight midwinter etc).

    The current plan is me and one buddy go out with one or two deuce and a half's as we will bring a lot of stuff between the two of us. Basically a years worth of flour, yeast, freeze dried veggies and fruit, freeze dried meat, ammo, two hunting rifles (one at least bear capable), a shotgun, a 22, large first aid kit (Id like to be certified as a wilderness first responder, as would my friend), cooking gear, wood stove, spare parts for the truck, extra fuel for the truck and snow mobile, parts for the snowmobile, a large battery powered (or kerosene) lamp, extra batteries, headlamps/flashlights (with extra batteries), snowshoes or cross country skis, winter clothing, lots of wool blankets, two closed cell foam pads per person, reading material (a lot of it!),board games, journals, and probably more stuff.

    I think it will be easier to fly out to the west coast and purchase the supplies there (less shipping and such) and take a ferry or boat up to Alaska from there. Or potentially just find land up in Maine to do this all on (if somebody has land and will let me live on it for a year in return for a Deer Camp give me a shout!) as it would be safer (quicker rescue) and easier (closer to supplies) but less of an adventure in yet to be spoiled wilderness.
  2. Paveglass

    Paveglass Scout

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    Sounds like a great dream. My suggestion would be to pursue the effort in the lower 48, however. Alaska has a lot of ways to become dead if you don't really know what you are doing. You would be better served to find a spot to have a go at it in a safer place.
  3. Horseapple

    Horseapple Tracker

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    I would bring a full sized bed. Instead of the closed cell foam pads. No sense scimping on comfort!:4:
  4. MohaveGreen

    MohaveGreen Guide

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    Hmmmm..... I don't even know where or how to start replying to this post. That is one heck of an ambitious plan. I guess my only comment would be I hope you don't pick up a girlfriend in college that won't let you go. A lot can change in 4 years. Good luck and keep us posted on your progress.

    Afterthought - Have you considered some other kind of shelter other than building a cabin? Seems like a lot of unnecessary work.
  5. Northman242

    Northman242 Scout

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    Alaska is beautiful and vast...but I agree with Paveglass.

    Do not attempt long isolated adventures into the far northern hemisphere unless you are VERY experienced. The winter temperatures and weather alone up there can easily kill you....as well as many other things. Know your wild edibles as well...in Alaska it is more dangerous to look for edible plants, then to hunt for animals. I would also recommend visiting the your trip location prior to the long haul and get a bit familiar with the location.

    Grand planning and a ton of research would be key. Whatever you do...don't do what this guy did...

    [​IMG]

    Also...for your interest, I recommend watching this:

    [video=youtube;Iq0rZn8HFmQ]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iq0rZn8HFmQ[/video]
  6. MK-9

    MK-9 Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    I'd do a ton of reading and planning before even thinking about going through with this. I don't want to crap on anyone's dream by any means, but however tough you think this will be it'll be 10x as hard as you have it in your head. Look into stuff written by and about Dick Proenneke and check out this from a really amazing guy Doug Getgood that was at Woodsmoke. Doug did a year by himself up in Canada. See if there is a way to contact him via facebook or something. Just to at least get an idea of what you're getting yourself into.


    [video=youtube;2Mw1_OQBAvc]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Mw1_OQBAvc[/video]

    [EDIT]: For those interested the 'Les' he refers to is Les Stroud, who he [Doug] is talking to and does some of the filming in the video.
  7. sasquatch

    sasquatch Scout

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    I would like to go up north but that is why I am going with a group. Optimistically I will go with 3 other people, hopefully some experienced in cold camping. I already am going camping in the Maine winter (not the same, but its a start) and have already learned a lot about how to deal with the cold compared to what Alaska can be like.
    Dude, I sleep on college mattresses. The closed cell pads will be a relief. :4: Also Id rather take more food then a big bed. I can sleep on anything, but I can't eat anything.
    I aint living in a Maine or Alaskan winter in anything but a cabin! And if the girl won't let me go Ill dump her. This is a once in a lifetime experience and I will never have another chance once I am settled down. Plus Im an ambitions fella!
    I was thinking no far north than Anchorage (preferably south of there) preferably on the coast near the Gulf of Alaska just to mellow out the winter. I don't want a super duper extreme environment, just a wild one. Also I read about that guy who killed himself by his own stupidity, and planning NOW not a few weeks before is due to him. Im ballsy, not stupid. Its why I want to have a backup and evacuation plan even before I step foot on site.

    The challenge is the fun in this case, so the tougher the better!
  8. MohaveGreen

    MohaveGreen Guide

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    Read Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer. It's the story about Chris McCandless (pictured above). Don't just watch the movie - read the book. Sounds like a grand adventure but that dude died hard due to a lack of knowledge which resulted in a a series of simple mistakes that could have been avoided.

    Personally, I'd pick a much more forgiving environment. Maybe go live in a yurt in the high desert somewhere near a reliable water source. Still wild and tough, but not quite so death-defying. Plus, you wouldn't need to buy and pack in quite so much gear.

    ETA: Just noticed that maybe you did read about McCandless. So.... more power to you. I'd still pick the desert, tho, but that's just me. At least you'd be more or less at the top of the food chain there (cougars aside).
  9. Das_Sheep

    Das_Sheep Tracker

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    In eastern Kentucky and West Virginia there is a lot of wild land left. The Danial Boone national forest has some very wild places, some very long trails and some of the most beautiful land you well ever lay your eyes on. You can walk for days and never see a road or another person.

    If you want to camp in one location, that's an option. You can get a hunting license.

    I would suggest against a 365 year camp though if only because winter camping, while fun for a short time, is mostly going to be two guys sitting around playing cards and wishing they had something green to eat for like, a long time. Even though it does not get bad snow, the greens are gone and there is only so much to do.

    There are a couple of really long trails that are way out in the boonies there, some a few hundred miles long. At a pace of maybe 6 or seven easy miles a day you could have trips that are months long. Because you can reach towns along the way, you do not have to carry a years supply of salt, coffee and multivitamins, socks and underwear which you might want to have otherwise.

    Another suggestion would be to take a camcorder with you along with extra memory and a way to charge it. Do little sessions with your friend and you where you talk about what you have learned, and maybe reviews. What gear did you use, what gear did you not use, which gear do you wish you had.

    Along with that camcorder, an ipad or other tablet PC that you can charge so you can keep up with the weather is important. Weather can change very rapidly, and you do not want to learn about a thunder storm moving in and dumping 15 inches of rain at 3am when you are camped by a creek and it was nice out the day before. Also that ipad will let you post video's and update your buddies here on bushcraft USA with your progress. If your savvy you can even make a little map of your progress and upload pictures and video's from different trails.


    I advise against just camping in one spot. I think that would get very boring very quickly. Sure building a shelter and hunting and gathering would be neat at first, but it gets old eventually.

    Another really fun long trip idea is moving by canoe. You can carry a heck of a lot more stuff and your feet will not bleed as much. Limits your options of parks to do it in.


    Last comment: Lyme disease. If you camp in the lower 48 familiarize yourself with the symptoms, and check yourself and your friend for tick's daily. If you get them off early you usually will not get the disease. Every morning when you get up and every evening when you go to bed is a good idea. Taking a bottle of Antibiotics with you for treating that, and various water borne fun is probably a good idea. You can also wear blousing straps on your pants around your boot tops to make your pants look awesome and bloused and prevent ticks from easily climbing up into your pants.

    Edit: For financing, talk to discovery channel or the like about it and maybe they will give you like $5k in return for footage of the journey. Another option is something like gofundme or kick starter. Take a few pictures of you and your friend doing bushcrafty things, then write some sort of tear jerking summery about wanting this once in a life time chance to do this with a friend, and ask random strangers to finance your escapades.
  10. MohaveGreen

    MohaveGreen Guide

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    Or just yo-yo one of the three long-distance trails (AT, PCT, CDT). You could easily turn that into a year-long pursuit, and it would give you something to be doing other than just holing up. I understand that the CDT is still substantially more "wild" than the others. It's also longer, and you could still get your grizzlies on the north end like you would in AK.
  11. Dearborn

    Dearborn Scout Deceased

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    Long Term Camping

    You should by all means follow your dream, but I would recommend living on the edge of wilderness and easing back and forth as circumstance dictates until you acquire some skills you never thought of. I've known of a few people who conducted their life in that manner and they generally did pretty good by being flexible.
  12. dragon383

    dragon383 Banned Member Banned

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    I kept tellin my gf, theres sasquatch here in maine.... she didnt believe me, now i have proof... anywho good luck on your adventure. ya know, there are in between spots you could go... further than maine but not quite as brutal as alaska... how bout trying someplace in northern canada... might be a good happy medium
  13. Two Bears

    Two Bears Banned Member Banned

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    If you take some rope and plenty of blankets you can make a bed. I have them made in historical sites, you would use the rope for the mattress tie them around or through drilled holes in logs use a tongue and mortise to put the main frame together put the blankets over the rope, the thicker the better.
  14. sasquatch

    sasquatch Scout

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    I have already had Lymes and Bartenella (at the same time, which taught me why antibiotics are amazing) I know exactly what you are talking about. The colder it is the fewer ticks. And I HATE TICKS! I also wear gators when out and about an do tick checks at every stop (call me paranoid). Basically I want to go create a base camp and do adventures all over.

    Canoeing would be fun, but not for a year. Should I build a cabin, and live out of their I can canoe and hunt and fish, but have a real bed to go back to and should the weather go bad I don't have to sit in a wee little tent. The gofundme and kickstarter are genius as is the discovery channel. Perhaps I can do this for free (for me). :4:
    Eww hiking! I like a day hike, but I have a bum leg and can only maintain a few miles (10 or so) for 4 or 5 days. Canoeing is easier, but Id really like to live in a cabin.
    I already try to! The house is heated entirely by wood, I have been learning to trap and track. I have done a wool blanket overnight in 20 degree weather (froze my face to a blanket). Its good to be too flexible, but I have a dream and I am damned well achieving it, hell or high-water, cold or no cold, black bears or brown.
    Lol yeah, upstate Maine is plenty harsh, but not wild. I really want to have no light pollution and feel like Lewis and Clarke (sans hurting the native population).
    That actually sounds like a great idea. It would be easier than a bed and take up less space, though it wouldn't be great seating.
  15. Aegis

    Aegis Tracker

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    I would not go for a year for your first long term. Go for a month to 6 weeks for proof of concept. You will learn what you need, and what you don't. You will learn what you know, and what you need to learn.
  16. sasquatch

    sasquatch Scout

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    I have a 2 week trip planned for the spring in upstate Maine so I am trying to work my way up. I have already don't a month long trip a few years back, but that wasn't self planned.

    EDIT: I just want to say that this year expedition is a fact, the location and when is the only part that will change.
  17. foxfire

    foxfire Supporter Supporter

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    You can't just homestead in Alaska anymore. And most land here is state, federal or native owned.

    http://www.blm.gov/ak/st/en/prog/cultural/ak_history/homesteading/homesteading_Q_and_A.html

    Your plan the way your describing it would cost you and your buddies thousnd's of dollars. It is nice to have dream's but sometimes you have to be realistic. McCandless had dream's of living off the land and we all know the tragic end for that story. As have many other's who have tried that. Some live other's don't.

    If you want to try it, start looking at purchasing a parcel of land from someone or the state. Then try it. So if you don't succeed you can sell the land and have some money to pay off your debt's or some profit.
  18. captainamer

    captainamer Scout

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    As cool as it sounds. With as much as you plan on taking 2 military 5tons i personally think this is not bushcraft. Buy some land, build a cabin and just move in. It sounds like your just moving. With that much food and gear wont take alot of skills past building the cabin.

    Just sounds more survival hero related with 10 tons of gear.

    It does sound fun. On tv the alaska troopers kicked some old man out his shack he had lived in with 9tons less gear for 14 years because he was not the land owner. So yes it can be done. Good luck!
  19. book

    book Tracker

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    Log Building

    Check out Ron Brodigan's Great Lakes School of Log Building before you head out. Also you may want to contact Fred Rungee at Salana, Ak. He is in his late eighties and lives in one of the many cabins that he has built over the years. It is a four mile hike to his latest cabin so he had to backpack everything in . He was a Smokejumper, BLM Fire Management Officer, survived a grizzly bear attack, and is an Alaska legend.
  20. sasquatch

    sasquatch Scout

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    I was planning on purchasing land and then selling said land (or keeping it depending on how my finances are). hat was actually my first step, and I think I can get enough land for about $5000 or less. With the BLMs budget issues (they sound like they are going broke) I doubt they would be too adverse to selling a few acres. :4:
    The amount of gear I want to bring in is primarily food and emergency supplies and is probably over stated. I would like to live off the land, but as Alaska is harsh that is too optimistic and I will simply supplement my food supply with native flora and fauna. Also, I was planning on two 2 1/2 tons or one 5 ton depending on which is cheaper to operate and purchase. ;) After reading McCandless I saw where he went wrong and where I could improve upon his mistakes, so I decided its better to have it and not need it.
    Thank you for the tips. I was hoping for more advice like this not 'well you can't just set up camp in Alaska now' type stuff.
  21. PlowBoy93

    PlowBoy93 Tracker

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    From one young man to another really think about what your saying
  22. sasquatch

    sasquatch Scout

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    How so? So far the majority of the advice I have received is essentially the same old 'you really probably can't do this' in a different wrapper. I have been told I can't do lots of things and so far everyone who has told me I can't do something has been wrong and Im going to do this with or without a stragers approval. I am just looking for tips on things I would over look, like spare axe handles or some such.
  23. book

    book Tracker

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    You may want to apply for a seasonal fire fighting job with the BLM out of Fairbanks, AK. That way you would have a chance to look over the state and make some contacts. Alaska covers a vast area but has few roads so that most of the state is covered only by aircraft.
  24. foxfire

    foxfire Supporter Supporter

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    Here is info on purchasing land here in Alaska. Which in your original post has no mention of purchasing. http://dnr.alaska.gov/mlw/landsale/


    Current price list of supplies and gear,
    .59acres Soldotna $149,500.00
    Truck 2 1/2 ton x2 $43,000.
    Diesel fuel, $4.68/gal currently
    Gasoline, $ 3.95/gal currently x's 8-12 gal per tank for snowmachine.
    Mre's 1month $693.29 x 4 =$2777.00
    Snowmachine used from $1900.00 to 8,000.00.
    Wood stove, $770.00
    Freezes dried foods basic 1yr supply $2236.00
    Hunting/fishing license non resident $230.00 only good till dec31 same year also need permits for for king salmon fishing $50.00 for 14 days, annual 100.00, waterfowl stamp 5.00, need permits to hunt large game Nonresident Tags: Do I need a guide? Nonresident

    Nonresident Brown/Grizzly Bear Yes $500.00
    Nonresident Black Bear -- $225.00
    Nonresident Bison -- $450.00
    Nonresident Caribou -- $325.00
    Nonresident Deer -- $150.00
    Nonresident Elk -- $300.00
    Nonresident Goat Yes $300.00
    Nonresident Moose -- Yes $400.00
    Nonresident Muskox - Bull -- Yes $1,100.00
    Nonresident Muskox – Cow -- Not Allowed
    Nonresident Sheep Yes $425.00
    Nonresident Wolf -- $30.00
    Nonresident Wolverine -- $175.00
    Nonresident Duplicate (replacement) Tag
    (For any above species) -- $5.00
    And you need to hire a licensed guide for moose, mtn goat, sheep,
    Plus thousands of extra dollars for all the other gear you'll need. Not counting paying off your student loans.

    So unless your independently wealthy or plan on saving for the next 4-5 yrs your dream will be just that. And these are current prices for things will probably before expensive later.
  25. sasquatch

    sasquatch Scout

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    Thanks. I was looking at doing the same in upstate Maine or working for a friends father as an tree counter.

    I don't know where y'all are finding those trucks, but I can get a good surplus deuce and a half in 100% condition for about $7000 in Washington state (found 3 actually). I also wasn't really planning on hunting too much, though it would be fun, but wolf and wolverine don't seem to be good sources of meat. Also, fuel up in Alaska (according to you) is way cheaper than where I am as are snow machines. And where is Soldnata? It seems ridiculous that .59 acres should be more expensive in an isolated place when compared to a 5 acre plot in Maine. And again, I am saving and have a bit of savings left over and am also still making money working and due to merit scholarships won't have more than 10k in student loans, less if I become an RA (working hard is worth it!).
  26. Makarov

    Makarov Scout

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    You might consider peace corps or something like that, depending on what your major in college is they will pay you a little bit to live on and fly you in and out of your adventure. (more likely to be warm than cold) If your an education major you can teach in Alaska and get paid while you learn.
  27. foxfire

    foxfire Supporter Supporter

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    You would be better off doing it in Maine as then you could just transport your needed gear by a rental truck or trailer. Then you could easily stockpile your things easier. Less cost.

    Those fuel prices were for today. I pay 638.00 a month for a 100 gallons of stove oil. And luckily it hasn't been to cold. Soldotna is in the southern portion of the state outside of anchorage. Land prices are really high here. So is housing prices.


    And here is another story of a person who has gone missing here http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...g-Alaskan-wilderness-5-month-hiking-trip.html. And he was only going to hike across a area.

    Alaska is a very unforgiving place at time's.
  28. riverjoe

    riverjoe Supporter Supporter

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    Well I never tried going into the bush for a year , but I did buy a 53 Chevy back when I was 18 for $65 and with a $135 seed money I took off for the wilds of Florida . Doing odd jobs and watching my pennies I survived just fine for 6 months until I got a girlfriend and had to get a job and an apartment .
    There is a little book I like called Cache Lake country wherein the author goes into much detail about the amount of grub to pack in and countless other tips about living in the wild .
    Im with the others that recomend the lower 48 tho . Lots of dirt cheap tax sale land in the UP of Michigan .
    Still cheap land in Montana and other parts of the west if you don't need water (but I guess you would need water eh). Upper Minnesota plenty wild .
    I say get yourself a Dodge minivan with a small trailer and a dirt bike to start . About 2 to 3 grand .
    Good mileage 75 per cent as good as a four wheel drive and CHEAP .
    Take out all the seats , install a woodburner your good to go .

    You can process about as much wood with a good Stihl chainsaw in a day that would take you about a week with an axe .

    Alaska is probabley about 95 % inaccesible even with a deuce .
  29. sasquatch

    sasquatch Scout

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    I have considered it, but they have no need for foresters really
    That would be easier, and potentially just as fun, though a bit of work none the less.
  30. sasquatch

    sasquatch Scout

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    Thank you for the tip on the book. I was looking to hunt down a book like that (thanks for saving me the effort!). Though I need water more than anything else. I can pack in enough staples for a year, but not enough water.
    And yeah, an axe is for splitting, but a saw is needed for processing logs and cutting trees. I want a deuce as my mother is in construction and I likely will enter the business (or put a box on the back and live in it like an RV).
  31. VinWild

    VinWild Scout

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    I will tell you this; most all building materials (even small stuff) is outrageous in AK. Everyday commodities; things you take for granted in the lower 48; are ridiculously priced. Not to mention we were paying $8.53 per gallon of fuel and then straining off a quart and a half of water out of 15 gallon totes, at fish camp this season (and that is pumped right out of the port pumps!).
    If you don't have $20K at your disposal, then what you are talking is impossible.
    I have worked for many summers as a pro-guide for various lodges and outfitter's in AK and can tell you first hand - in order to live; you spend money and lot's of it. Yes you can make a great deal of coin in a short time working seasonally in AK; but to go up blind and expect to live like Jeremiah Johnson these days, is unheard of; and the locals would turn their head the first time you need help.
    It takes years of research, multiple trips, influential connections & contacts and making the right friends to pull off what you are talking about.
    Not trying to talk you out of anything, just making some suggestions. I admire your enthusiasm to live outside the box.
    I tell you what; on your journey west and then north; you fly to WA State and I will put you up at my cabin property for the time you spend here vs. flying to your final destination.
    I will discuss in detail what I know, who I know and trust and point you in the right direction; maybe even find you a job in the remote bush that would satisfy your "adventurous" spirit. Seriously.
    Peace - From The North Fork
  32. riverjoe

    riverjoe Supporter Supporter

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    I love a deuce . Down at Fort Polk in the sixtys we had a little rag tag detachment whose task it was to attack the trainees . (designated enemy ) They assigned us a stripped down deuse , no cab , no nothin , that thing would literally float across those soupy mud holes in Kisatchee national forest .
    Run on really low quality fuel too .
  33. Zaveral

    Zaveral Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Sounds like you have your heart set on this trip. I think it is cool. Be careful and plan well, but go! You will only get one chance and will hate it if you don't at least give it a try. Of course, life may get in the way, but it is great to have dreams to strive towards.
    These are the only things I could think of to help you out:

    If you are going to be living there for a year you may be able to get resident hunting and fishing licenses. You can usually be counted as a resident in most states after living there for 6 months. I don't know if that is the case with Alaska but you can look into it. If you can be counted as a resident think about getting a lifetime license. You may want to go back and hunt there several times in the future.

    You could volunteer for work during the next few summers in various gov outdoor agencies like BLM or the forest service. That would allow you to check out local areas and possibly find the perfect place for your cabin. The Student Conservation Association provides a connection between the gov agencies and volunteers. Check out their website: http://www.thesca.org/ I was a SCA volunteer when I was in my 20's in Arkansas. They provide you with housing and pay a little bit of money. You have to work but have quite a bit of time to explore outside of work hours. Alaska positions are the most popular in the SCA so you will have to be pretty well qualified to get a position.

    You don't have to spend a ton of money for freeze dried food. You can get a lot of dry foods at the grocery store for a fraction of the cost of freeze dried. I think instant mashed potatoes are freeze dried. Eating freeze dried food for more than a week will leave you hungry and gaseous! The fallout is deadly. Ha!

    Have a good relationship with your doctor. Get all the medical training you can get and read a lot of books on emergency medicine. Like "Ditch Medicine", "Medicine for Mountianeering", "Wilderness Medicine" (I like that one best), also "Where There is No Doctor". The main reason to have a good relationship with your doctor is he/she can provide you with the prescription meds that are recommended in books like Wilderness Medicine for your first aid kit. Also have all your teeth problems fixed before you go.

    Take plenty of guide books. I would probably have more weight in books than food but I'm a nerd. Keep a journal (online if possible-I'd like to read it). Start your journal now while you are in the planning stages and write a book about the whole process when you get back.


    learn to sew, do tai chi, play lots of games, and take some vitamin d for lack of sunshine in the winter.

    These are just suggestions. I hope you found at least some of them useful. Good Luck!
  34. sasquatch

    sasquatch Scout

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    My plan was to basically set up camp in Washington temporarily and purchase my equipment there and ship up my gear on a boat. The fact is at the moment I am not very experienced, but given time I will become more so. I also am looking for jobs out in the bush (forestry or otherwise). I have already applied for a few jobs, but haven't heard back and the paper work is really ridiculous.
    Yup. The LDT 463 (IIRC) is a great engine from what I hear. Worked on and off for an older Marine who drove and serviced them in Vietnam. Real love have thing there.
    Thank you. I just want to try and eat well enough, but I don't expect gourmet food year round. Thank you for the teeth tips, stuff like that is why I started the thread! Little things seem to be forgotten in plans like this. I do currently keep a journal on all things, but this should be a better read (or this thread can be my journal until I head out, then Ill digitize it and post it here post trip).
  35. nothinghead

    nothinghead Guide Bushclass I

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    Here is another story for you, Another Mainer too. http://bangordailynews.com/2012/12/26/news/maine-hikers-body-found-on-alaska-mountain/

    I say this not to discourage, but to caution. Just be careful, and keep a journal. then at least someone else can make some money off you in a book and movie.

    Where in Maine are you? There were parts of Washington County that had no light pollution, and not much in the way of people. Certainly not Alaska, but good enough for me.

    My cousin lives on Kodiak and is married to a Coastie on one of the cutters. He was the acting XO when he got the word that one of his crew went missing while on a hike. Never heard if they found him. Might be the guy in the link I just posted actually.

    I hear Ketchikan is less harsh, but very isolated. It's more of the temperate rainforest I believe, than the frozen tundra. Perhaps head down that way if it's Alaska or nothing. Never been myself.

    After reading the article again I see that this was infact a crew member of the CGC Munro.
  36. JRW87

    JRW87 Tracker

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    Some guys did a year long jaunt around New Zealand trying to take a trophy of every kind of deer we have plus Tahr and Chamois Ill see if I can find and account of it when Im back on a PC.

    Sent from my GT-S5570 using Tapatalk 2
  37. sasquatch

    sasquatch Scout

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    Well Aroostook county (spelling?) and Caribou are pretty rural as well. I am currently a student at UMO (forestry) and am looking (i.e. convincing mom) to move up with me. Ive spent some time up at Shin Pond which is beautiful country. Where isn't so much as an issue as how will I pay for it! Also I do want to do Alaska or bust and not all of it is tundra (I do not believe it to be realistic to live in an area harsher than Maine). The point of this thread was to get a better idea of where to start and where to go so I do not go the way of McCandless or the countless others who get lost in the bush.
    Thanks, that actually sounds like a wonderful trip and great reading.
  38. nothinghead

    nothinghead Guide Bushclass I

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    The County is definitely remote. Have you been up to the Northern Wilderness? The 100 mile wilderness is another place to go test yourself, and that's just south of Baxter.

    There is a member here who has a wilderness school up in the county. Perhaps you could do one of his apprenticeshipsnto gain some dirt time and experience. You can never have too much of either of those.
  39. sasquatch

    sasquatch Scout

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    Do you happen to know his name? I have hiked Katahdhin and already done a 180 mile canoe trip (as a 13 year old I may add, kinda proud of that). I don't remember the route but I soloed the northeast carry as a 15 year old up on moose head. Im not a city slicker and am stubborn as all hell, but I don't have a ton of dirt time.
  40. foxfire

    foxfire Supporter Supporter

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  41. nothinghead

    nothinghead Guide Bushclass I

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    Thanks Foxfire, that's the one I was talking about.
  42. Aegis

    Aegis Tracker

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    Confidence is the food of the wise man but the liquor of the fool.

    Blame Tapatalk 2 for typos.
  43. sdjsdj

    sdjsdj Guide Bushclass I

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    Sounds like you are planning well in advance and asking advice. Both good signs. If I were to do it, I would try to take a semester and work/get school credit doing the most "backcountry remote primitive work possible". In addition to some financial resources, I think you will need to get 2 things under your belt before you go.

    1) As much "extended hardcore dirt time" as possible with a mentor to make sure you have mastered the proper skills. (That is one area where the "Into the Wild" guy failed. He got some advice but did not master it for the environment he would be in)

    2) A good handle on your personality to know how much "alone time" you can spend without outside interaction. To me this is often overlooked by people that want to "strike out on their own". Another good read is the "Indian Creek Chronicles". He spends a winter in western MT in a 8 x 10 wall tent working for the Forest Service It's an enjoyable read.

    ETA: Sorry, I did not originally catch that you are planning on "going out with a buddy". But I'd still make sure you know your personal limits of being alone. Not everything goes according to plan...

    I know quite a few people that decided to "retire to the Northwoods in the Upper Midwest". After one winter they could not handle the isolation, monotony, amount of work/energy required to overcome nature, lack of services. These people had been going up there their whole lives, but it was different living there. But some people made it just fine.
  44. riverjoe

    riverjoe Supporter Supporter

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    “Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.”

    Mark Twain
  45. cobbsteve14

    cobbsteve14 Scout

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    Go on you tube and check out the Alaskan experiment. Those guys had a hell of a time and they were getting help. Im not saying don't do it just don't go half cocked and get in over your head.
  46. sdjsdj

    sdjsdj Guide Bushclass I

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    Totally agree. But I would add, be willing to "pay the price", which might include death/permanent disability/alienation from family.
  47. sdjsdj

    sdjsdj Guide Bushclass I

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    A couple of years ago on PBS they had a few different series on people "recreating" different time periods/different places, frontierland, prairie, mountainman, etc.. At the end they were "evaluated" by experts as to their success. Lot's and lots of hard/boring work.
  48. riverjoe

    riverjoe Supporter Supporter

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    I watched a few of those shows . Some of those dweebs they chose would have trouble coping with a Boy Scout weekend campout . One that impressed me the most was some little Asian girl , I think she was a doctor or lawyer or something . She could have survived anywhere I think . She was tough.
  49. sasquatch

    sasquatch Scout

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    Well, good thing Im not too foolish. I am planning and prepping.
    Id rather starve to death over a few weeks than die over a period of years.
    Thanks. I know it will be boring and lots of work, but that sounds a lot like high school, and I really enjoy manual labor.
  50. RavenLoon

    RavenLoon axology student Supporter

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    I would forget the military surplus vehicles and just use an old 4wd pickup. What if you need a part way out in the boonies? I know you can get them but you would wait for days or weeks. I've never been to Alaska but I think most of those that live in the bush use conventional vehicles if they have them at all.

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