1095 budget Knife bender...

Discussion in 'Edged Tools' started by WILL, Nov 7, 2018.

  1. WILL

    WILL Guide

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    @TomJ I don't like half broke gear, so I tightened down the puukko knife blade into my vice and proceeded to beat the handle with a 2x4 quite a bit. The tang never broke, but I managed to cause a crack that went all the way around the handle. The handle stayed attached and firm. So in a survival situation the knife would still have worked just fine. The only way that handle came off was with an angle grinder. So here's what the tang looks like....



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  2. WILL

    WILL Guide

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    The factory epoxy job actually looked pretty good. I was curious if the blade was in fact carbon steel, so I cold blued it. It cold blued just fine, confirming it was not stainless steel. I then sanded a lot of the cold bluing off to give it a patinaed look. I fabbed a new handle out of black walnut and epoxied it on. Added a lanyard hole. Back to testing....
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  3. WILL

    WILL Guide

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    Lessons learned so far, a puukko is a cutting tool not a pry bar or axe.
     
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  4. WILL

    WILL Guide

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    BE5B9B3E-166A-4B98-B50E-38B783F6025F.jpeg
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    Workin it some more.
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2018
  5. TomJ

    TomJ Guide Bushclass I

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    Thank you and good to know. Sorry you had that failure. I am glad to see it has a decent length tang.

    Edit: I think if the wood grain had gone lengthwise with the handle I don’t think it would have cracked. “Maybe” :)
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2018
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  6. TomJ

    TomJ Guide Bushclass I

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    Amazing transformation! I love it. I was wondering about the steel as well as there is no hint of corrosion.

    That handle is awesome!
     
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  7. TAHAWK

    TAHAWK Guide

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    I certainly agree that a puukko in neither a pry bar nor an axe, but I have used then as mini froes for decades by careful application of force and a grip only tight enough to keep them in place. Trouble is, were I stressed and really cold, would I mishit or hit too hard? It would not be as forgiving as a true froe or an axe. :oops:
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2018
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  8. WILL

    WILL Guide

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    Man I have to agree. It’s hard to imagine a radial crack against the grain.

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  9. Vanitas

    Vanitas Supporter Supporter

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    Happens a lot with wood... get some sawdust and some epoxy, fill her up and sand her down and good to go. Other thing you can do is soak it in mineral oil and then beeswax the wood. That wood isnt stabalized so as humidity changes the wood moves and cracks.... keeping the wood oiled well will keep the wood swollen. Obviously the wood they used wasnt dried enough to keep shrinkage from happening but is pretty common in getting knives hand made from places where they use local wood or wood from a store.
     
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  10. TAHAWK

    TAHAWK Guide

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    Thus far, my Pakis' handles are fine, but they are riveted scales on full tangs so different situation entirely. Too bad about yours. I liked the way the original handle looked. New one looks comfortable.
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2018
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  11. OiMcCoy

    OiMcCoy Scout

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    Love the new handle. Cool to see this questionable knife mostly hold up.
     
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  12. WILL

    WILL Guide

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    I sanded the forge scales and imperfections out of the Jeff White blade and then blued it. I found they trapped dirt, made cleaning the knife a pain, and the improvements smoothed cutting. I decided to carve a spoon today. I noticed almost immediately that the jumping abraded my thumb on push cuts. I do a lot of push cuts while carving, so the Jeff White knife was quickly put aside.

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    The Puukko turned out to be a supreme carver...

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  13. TAHAWK

    TAHAWK Guide

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  14. WILL

    WILL Guide

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    Tried to start a flint and steel fire using the spine of the Puukko. I can now confirm for certain it is not high carbon 10-95 steel. Zero spark and the flint made deep impressions into the steel.
     
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  15. forginhill

    forginhill Scout

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    Excellent additions to your collection! Fan of 1095 too.....
     
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  16. forginhill

    forginhill Scout

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    Could it just be that it's differentially hardened, with the spine softer?
     
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  17. Vanitas

    Vanitas Supporter Supporter

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    Sounds differentialy hardened to me, hard edge soft spine.
     
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  18. floogy

    floogy Tracker

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    Nice report. I like the Jeff White, but that jimping is obnoxious and out of place for this knife. They could have made it shallower. Any thoughts of smoothing it out? Looks like a great knife otherwise.
     
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  19. TAHAWK

    TAHAWK Guide

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    To get sparks from a ferro rod takes a sharp, hard edge - of any material. Can be SS. Can be glass. Could be 1095. Chocolate would not do.

    Using natural flint takes non-SS steel that is knife hard. If you get "sparks,: the flint has removed steel from the "steel." If the "steel" is unmarked, you got no sparks.
     
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