15 Wild Foods That Will Keep You Alive In An Emergency

Discussion in 'Preparedness' started by Harper, Jul 19, 2018.

  1. Harper

    Harper Supporter Supporter

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    ---

    Here is another article by an herbalist that I've been reading lately. I have previously posted some of his other pieces. He is doing a 30 day Survival Challenge.


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    15 Wild Foods That Will Keep You Alive In An Emergency
    [​IMG] Scott Sexton
    date_range July 17, 2018

    The 30-Day Survival Challenge, Part 2
    Follow my journey in this series of articles and videos as I survive for 30 days off of the foods I can get through foraging, hunting, fishing, and trapping. Along the way, I’ll pass along my strategies, tips, and tricks for survival.

    Read Part 1: “Living Off the Land: Surviving Week #1”

    In my last article, I talked about my two primary calorie sources during the first week of my survival challenge—blackberries and fish. Today, I’d like to tell you about some of the other things I ate during Week #1, and give you a short rundown of each one.

    Plants
    Lamb’s Quarters—Edible raw or cooked. Highly nutritious. Not nearly as tasty without butter, salt, and pepper.

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    Pokeweed—Passable without seasoning, but not nearly as exciting. See my article on pokeweed for more details.

    Read More: “Pokeweed: The Weed, The Myth, The Legend”

    Dock Seeds—These have a nice, nutty flavor when roasted, and they’re easy to harvest in abundance. The only downside is that they take a bit of effort to process.

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    Wild Carrots—I got distracted and forgot about these. Roots usually need to be processed the same day that you harvest them. By the time I noticed them on the counter again, they had dried into unusable sticks. I still tried to cook them, but all I managed to create was a vaguely carroty broth.

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    Purslane—This common garden weed is delicious raw. It’s also high in omega-3 fatty acids.

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    Sheep Sorrel—This plant’s sword shaped leaves have a pleasant tangy taste.

    Wood Sorrel—Often mistaken for clover, wood sorrel is a tasty trail nibble. Its flavor is much like sheep sorrel.

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    Yucca Pods—These are fairly sweet once roasted. They have a slightly bitter aftertaste, but it isn’t bad.

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    Crab apples—”Crab apple” refers to the size of the apple; not a particular variety. All apples are edible, though not all are desirable. Roasting helps to bring out the sweetness in this often-bitter fruit. A little cinnamon-sugar would’ve helped though. . . .

    (Cont.)
     
  2. Harper

    Harper Supporter Supporter

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    Leatherleaf Mahonia—The berries start sweet, but have a poor aftertaste. In a survival setting, I’d say they’re worth it.

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    Animals
    Eggs—I’ve found some bird nests in my fruit trees. I thought about harvesting the eggs, but it seemed rude to eat guests. If I find an accessible nest elsewhere, I might give it a try.

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    Crawfish—I almost ate a crawfish, but that’s a weird story. As I was cleaning one of the fish I caught, I saw that it had a crawfish poking out of its throat. This fish’s stomach was literally full to the point that the crawfish’s pinchers and antenna were sticking into its mouth, and it still bit my lure. (Needless to say, I’m going to buy some more of that type of lure.) The crawfish looked fresh, and I considered cooking it up. But in the end, I decided that I wasn’t quite hungry enough to eat secondhand crawfish.

    Earthworms—Not gonna lie . . . these are not my favorite. I know how to prepare and eat them, but I may not have found the most pleasing method. They always have a little grit left in them, and the taste is not my favorite. Even in “predator mode” these require a little pep talk. Still, you can’t beat them as a convenient protein source.

    Ants—Highly abundant, but a pain to gather. You’ll always find one with a lot of spirit that wants to hang on to your inner lip to keep from being swallowed. If you can get to the eggs, that’s the way to go. The taste can vary between species.

    Wasp Larva—These may involve a little risk to gather, but they can be eaten raw without fear of parasites, and bugs are a great source of protein. They look nasty, but they have a buttery taste with a hint of sweetness.

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    I think that wraps things up for this week. Join me next time to see where else my adventure takes me.

    What wild foods would you add to this list? Do you have any questions about what I’ve been eating or about anything else in my adventure? Let me know in the comments!

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    Psst! Our Lawyer Wants You to Read This Big, Bad Medical Disclaimer –> The contents of this article, made available via The Grow Network (TGN), are for informational purposes only and do not constitute medical advice; the Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. If you think you may be suffering from any medical condition, you should seek immediate medical attention. You should never delay seeking medical advice, disregard medical advice, or discontinue medical treatment because of information provided by TGN. Reliance on any information provided by this article is solely at your own risk. And, of course, never eat a wild plant without first checking with a local expert.

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    Scott Sexton
    Scott Sexton is a TGN Trailblazer, a highly experimental gardener, an unrelenting weed-eater, and a largely non-profit herbalist (much to his wife’s chagrin). When Scott is not teaching foraging classes, testing out theories in the garden, or grazing in the forest, he can be found at his Facebook page, “A Forager’s Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse.”


    Source: https://thegrownetwork.com/15-wild-foods-emergency/
     
  3. Brew-Jitsu

    Brew-Jitsu Mora Tribe #100 Supporter

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    Great post, Harper. Thank you.
     
  4. Paulyseggs

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    Awesome post!

    I Dig it!


    Hmm pokeweed. Was always told its risky if not done right.

    If I had to pick favorites .No particular order.
    Plantain
    Sorrel
    Sweet clover
    Violets
    Pigweed
    Jewelweed seeds
     
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  5. HeadyBrew

    HeadyBrew Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    An interesting read. Thanks for sharing. That wood sorrel looks very much like what I always brushed off as a weed around my landscaping.

    As I’m sitting outside while writing this, I snapped a quick pic. Not the best and this is a fairly dense cluster. Thoughts?

    BEDB20BE-51D0-471D-AA7D-54A3A7F73D66.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2018
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  6. Bitterroot Native

    Bitterroot Native Indigenous Skills Junkie

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    Great post @Harper !

    That sure looks like wood sorrel to me! Could be another variety but as far as I know there are no poisonous look alikes. Wood sorrel is one of my favorite wild greens. It has a nice and sweet lemon flavor to it due to its oxalic acid content.
     
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  7. Bob_Spr

    Bob_Spr Guide

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    Great read. Thanks for posting.
     
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  8. Jim L.

    Jim L. Guide

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    Sorrel is nice. I've grazed on it more than a few times. I understand a lotta folks add 'em to salads.
     
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  9. riverjoe

    riverjoe Supporter Supporter

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    I personally like roots more then greens so Solomon’s Seal , Teout Lillie bulbs , Ramps ofcourse and cutlef tooth wort are on my menu especially in spring .
    Sometimes you can find Jerusalem Artichoke growing wild and that’s a goldmine of nutrition .
    Also since I’m always close to water, cattail shoots and better are the rhizomes sticking out into the water on the edge of a cattail bank . Bull rush shoots and seeds Pickeral weed seeds and I haven’t tried Spatterdock seeds yet but I plan to this summer . Lotus seeds are rare around these parts but easily gathered . Crawdads are great if you can find the big ones taste more like Lobster than shrimp .
    Sometimes Frogs are thick in a given ditch or small pond where they are much easier to gather . Thistle and nettles are good and safe to ID if a little tricky to process . Usually found in sizable quantities which is important .
     
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  10. Bushcraft Bill

    Bushcraft Bill Scout

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    in theory your post is well done but almost nothing you posted is in my area when posting stuff like this post the area where these things are located was a totally useless posting for me...
     
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  11. riverjoe

    riverjoe Supporter Supporter

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    You’re right to point that out Bill . Always a pet
    Peeve of mine too , right up there with members who won’t post their locations
     
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  12. 1911srule

    1911srule Scout

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    I'd add Dandelion to the list. Also tapping maple or birch trees will provide hydration, and some calories.
     
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  13. 1911srule

    1911srule Scout

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    Made me think of another thing that keeps you alive in an emergency...not being rude
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2018
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  14. OrienM

    OrienM Guide

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    A good list...I have a bunch of these in my AO. I'd also add cactus, cattail and/or bulrush roots, elm tree leaves and seed pods, nettles, and mallow (both the wild globe mallows, and garden varieties).

    I think more micro-hunting and trapping would be good, too: snares for rabbits, deadfalls for rodents, setlines for fish. Forage while you check the traps...:dblthumb:

    I'll have to try dock seeds now, I've only ever eaten the immature flower stalks (which taste just like rhubarb, IMO).
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2018
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  15. Jim L.

    Jim L. Guide

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    Wild grape vine holds a butt lost of water. The nutrients (I suspect different sugars/minerals) being sent up stairs adds a nice, very light flavor. Very nice indeed.

    I once cut into a water oak which had fallen. Literally gallons of liquid were coming from a fifteen foot suspended section. The section was healthy and solid, not hollow.
     
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  16. blind & lost

    blind & lost Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Thank you for posting @Harper.
     
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  17. Gary V

    Gary V Scout

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    These are a few that I THINK are edibles that I had identified on my property. I did not take these photos. I found them on random searches while identifying wild edibles.

    Hairy Bittercress.jpg
    Hairy Bittercress

    Broadleaf Plantain.jpg
    Broadleaf Plantain

    Purple deadnettle.jpg
    Purple Deadnettle <-- I have tons of this stuff in the spring.


    PLEASE don't eat these on my word and feel free to correct me if I am wrong. I'm NOT AN EDIBLES Expert.
     
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