2019 International Herb Of The Year: Anise Hyssop (Agastache Foeniculum)

Discussion in 'Bush Medicine' started by Harper, May 15, 2019.

  1. Harper

    Harper Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2014
    Messages:
    6,339
    Likes Received:
    42,637
    ---



    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]




    Sponsored by The School of Natural Healing & Christopher Publications

    May 15, 2019

    Herb of the Year Jo Francks, M.H.

    This year’s international herb of the year is Anise hyssop (Agastache foeniculum).
    [​IMG]

    Anise hyssop is a native plant of North America in the mint family and has the flavor and scent of licorice and mint. It is a very attractive plant to grow in any herb garden and will act as most mints and spread itself out and take over if left to its own devices. This plant has attractive purple spike flowers which bloom from June to September and will attract visitors such as bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. Additionally, the scent of the leaves will deter unwanted munchers like deer and squirrels.

    Native American tribes had many uses for this plant. It was used as medicine for diarrhea, coughs and fevers and also as a flavoring for food.

    It can be used externally as a tea or poultice on wounds or burns, rashes, insect bites and itching. A salve can be made from the leaves and used for the same purpose. There have been cases where it has been helpful for poison ivy exposure. Anise hyssop is a wonderful cardiac tonic and mood enhancer.

    I’m excited to add this plant to my herb garden this year. I plan to harvest and dry the flowers to make sleep pillows or potpourri. I’ll harvest the leaves for tea to use as a cough medicine and a diaphoretic tea. I’ll also use the leaves to make an ointment for the skin. Anise hyssop has many uses and seems to be a great option for use in a medicinal herb garden.

    Jo Francks is a Master Herbalist working at The School of Natural Healing.

    Source:
    http://herballegacy.com/Herb of the Year.pdf
     
    mjh, NattyBo, Fiddlehead and 2 others like this.
  2. riverjoe

    riverjoe Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2011
    Messages:
    12,091
    Likes Received:
    23,723
    Location:
    Northern In. On the river
    Is it possible to love licorice and hate anise cookies . I think it is .
    I used to have to choke down Grandmas Anise cookies to be polite . Used to blow my nickel allowance on licorice ( used to be wrapped in cellophane and looked like a bicycle pedal .
    I’ll have to check out hyssop to see which camp it lives in .
     
    Harper likes this.
  3. mtnoutdoors

    mtnoutdoors Prov 27:17 Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2014
    Messages:
    6,385
    Likes Received:
    26,829
    Location:
    Oklahoma
    Very cool info thanks for sharing with us. Q how do you sign up on there news letter I was looking on there web page. Thanks Prov 27:17
     
    Harper likes this.
  4. Harper

    Harper Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2014
    Messages:
    6,339
    Likes Received:
    42,637
    http://www.herballegacy.com/
     
  5. NattyBo

    NattyBo Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2015
    Messages:
    1,218
    Likes Received:
    4,558
    Location:
    South Central PA
    I have lots of it for pollinators, but it keeps on giving after the flowers are gone. I let most of it go to seed and the goldfinches absolutely love it. I believe they stick around longer, through the end of summer, just to munch on it.
     
    JOttum and Harper like this.

Share This Page