31 Days of Trees and Leaves

Discussion in 'Flora & Fauna' started by NJHeart2Heart, Oct 1, 2019.

  1. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Backyard Bushcrafter Supporter

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    Hello friends!
    I thought a fun and informative way for me to get back into doing bushcraft things, and having something to share with the community, would be to do an advanced tree identification exercise.
    I accomplished the basic skill back in 2016/17 for Bushcraft Basic Bushclass, but I do enjoy it and have wanted to do a more extensive practice of it.

    So, starting today, I'm going to post here, one tree and and one leaf (or more), and maybe bonus bark pic too :p depending on how much time/proximity I have.

    This will be easy at first, since I know maybe 8-10 (naturally occurring) trees in this area pretty well, and then it will become a true test of my ability to hunt down trees and leaves ;)

    Wish me luck (Entry 1 to come tonight.. busy at work!o_O)

    :40::40:
     
  2. bacpacjac

    bacpacjac Queen of the Cups Supporter Bushclass I

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    Fantastic! What a great idea, Dawn! I'll be learning along with you. :)
     
  3. tristndad

    tristndad Supporter Supporter

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    Would you be interested in having someone name a tree and then having to go out and find one? Just a thought. Either way I will be watching. I love Dendro!
     
  4. Swampdog

    Swampdog Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Good Luck :41: !

    I'll be watching this thread and will try to play along; a picture of the bark will help.
     
  5. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Backyard Bushcrafter Supporter

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    I'm going to start easy.. I'll have a whole month to work towards the obscure :)
    My sources are Peterson Field Guide to Eastern Trees (I'm in northern New Jersey), and National Audubon Society Field Guide to Trees; Eastern Region North America.

    Day #1:
    Sugar Maple:
    Shape - Large tree with rounded, dense crown and striking multicolored foliage in autumn.

    48828588796_e495dcc883_k.jpg
    Leaves - Opposite, long and wide, palmately lobed with 5 deep long -pointed lobes; few narrow long pointed teeth; 5 main veins from base; dull dark green above (deep red, orange and yellow in autumn), paler and often hairy on veins beneath.

    ----->> Sugar Maple leaf on left. Red Maple leaf on right for comparison (to be featured at a later date!)
    48829931436_7bc891ea81_k.jpg
    Bark - light gray, becoming rough and deeply furrowed into narrow scaly ridges.
    48828224143_49d406f080_k.jpg

    Uses - Leading furniture wood, sometimes valued for special variations in grain patterns. Sap, when boiled and concentrated makes commercial maple sugar and syrup (yum! my favorite!)
     
  6. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Backyard Bushcrafter Supporter

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    That sounds like great fun!! :p I would definitely do that another time, or maybe someone else could take on that type of challenge right now, but I don't want to make it too difficult for myself right now :rolleyes: I want to be able to choose my own subject trees, since I work full time and will mostly have to get my pics local to the office during my lunch break :) Hopefully I will be able to venture out a bit more in the woods on weekends, but hubby and I are also moving from house to apartment this month, so it's all going to make things...challenging.:eek:

    I'm highly motivated because I really MISS posting and I really want to get back to contributing to this community! I miss my friends and all the great knowledge I've gained here, so hopefully this will be one way I can give back. :D

    :40::40:
     
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  7. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Backyard Bushcrafter Supporter

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    Awesome! I'd be honored if you follow me in my journey for the month :p

    :40::40:
     
  8. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Backyard Bushcrafter Supporter

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    ..Oh.. I may throw in some of my favorite large shrubs too, just because.. I luuuuv them :p:D

    :40::40:
     
  9. pellegrino

    pellegrino Much to learn... Lifetime Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Following. Definitely a skill I need to work on. This sounds awesome, Dawn. Good luck. And good luck with your move, too.
     
  10. Harper

    Harper Supporter Supporter

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    This a great idea!

    Do yourself a favor and read this book while you are doing your ID-ing:

    [​IMG]

    https://www.amazon.com/Hidden-Life-...KR4QV9MGQWQ&psc=1&refRID=GT5QMQWYDKR4QV9MGQWQ

    It has short chapters. Try to read one a day while you do this exercise.

    I cannot even express how much you will learn about trees. Not abourt ID-ing them, but how they live and why they do and grow the way that they do. It is a smooth read. It is not tree hugger gobblety gook.
     
  11. Ron

    Ron Guide

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    Great idea!
    Adding a playful contest-twist to it makes it much more fun.
    I hope you don't run out of species....
     
  12. Beach Hiker

    Beach Hiker LNR LB 42 Supporter

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    I will be following along, watching and learning.
    Great stuff!
     
  13. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Backyard Bushcrafter Supporter

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    Great idea! Glad it's not tree hugger gobbley good. I happily hang out with trees regularly, but I don't abide by gobbletey gook!! LOL
    Looking it up now! :)
    :40::40:
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2019
  14. KFF

    KFF Supporter Supporter

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    One might even say it's a simple read.
    Written by someone who is not a writer.
     
  15. Harper

    Harper Supporter Supporter

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    Don't get me wrong. I like trees. Obviously, I even read books about them. But some of those people are over the top.
     
  16. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Backyard Bushcrafter Supporter

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    I totally got it Harper, not to fear.. and I agree...:p
    :40::40:
     
  17. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Backyard Bushcrafter Supporter

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    Well.. true confession... I was curious to see how many trees I could list without looking.. ones that I am maybe familiar with, but don't have clear identification skills... and I listed 26 easily.. came up with the other 5 with just a bit more thought
    :)

    I made a checklist, although I am open to meeting and getting to know a new tree! :D

    :40::40:
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2019
  18. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Backyard Bushcrafter Supporter

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    Works for me.. I am reading another book right now (slowly, not every day, savoring when I do) that was, I think well authored :)

    The Book of Noticing: Collections and Connections: On the Trail
    by Katherine Hauswirth

    Actually two.. the other is "My Love Affair with the State of Maine".. THAT is a FUN read.. the author is a GREAT storyteller, and it's set in the 1950's with two women who run a small business in Goose Rocks Beach, ME - a place Ted and I are familiar with and love to visit!
    upload_2019-10-2_15-27-15.png

    :eek::eek:Hey whoah!!! TANGENT ALERT!!:eek::eek:

    :40::40:
     
  19. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Backyard Bushcrafter Supporter

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    So.. finished Chapter 1 an 2. Challenge accepted :D:D

    :40::40:
     
  20. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Backyard Bushcrafter Supporter

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    Day #2
    Tree: Black Walnut
    Shape: Large walnut tree with open, rounded crown of dark green aromatic foliage.
    This tree was sadly in pretty bad shape. Couldn't get a good pic of the whole tree, since it was overpowered by another different species.
    48833227152_2380a3896b_k.jpg
    Leaves: Pinnately compound 12-24" long, 9-21 leaflets 2.5-5" long, broadly lance shaped.
    48833058941_8c73343c85_k.jpg
    Bark: Dark brown deeply furrowed into scaly ridges.
    48839363267_f62e476b97_c.jpg 48838818478_4c4e41517a_c.jpg
    Uses: Black Walnut is highly valued for its hardwood qualities, edible nuts and blackish dye. *It also is known for it's Anti-fungal and Anti-parasitic qualities.
    48833227152_2380a3896b_k.jpg
    Sorry.. having a really tough night tonight. Was going to post another tree with more complete pics, but can't concentrate, so this will have to do. Tomorrow I'll see if I can get supplemental (whole tree and bark) pics to post here, as well as my next tree.

    *thanks @Harper for bonus info :41:
    Thanks for reading.


    :40::40:
     

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  21. Harper

    Harper Supporter Supporter

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  22. Lichen

    Lichen Supporter Supporter

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    We only have about 4 different trees here in the desert.
     
  23. po-dunk

    po-dunk Supporter Supporter

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    thank you for this thread. i'll be following along
     
  24. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Backyard Bushcrafter Supporter

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    Day #3 48832687753_5e1ff92add_k.jpg

    Tree: Pin Oak, related to Scarlet Oak

    48832688408_040e67d2f0_k.jpg
    Shape:Straight trunked, spreading horizontal branches, slender pinlike twigs and broadly conical crown.
    48838819558_94bc4c72ee_k.jpg
    Leaves: 2-4" long, 5-7 deep lobes, nearly to midvein with few bristle-tipped teeth and wide rounded sinuses, base short pointed.

    48833223677_c5492cfbc1_k.jpg

    Bark: Dark gray, hard, smooth, becoming fissured into short, broad, scaly ridges.

    48833053251_6d85aaf76b_k.jpg
    Twigs are thin and pinlike, with acorns about 1/2" long and broad, nearly round.
    48838819998_1461cd4ac7_k.jpg

    Uses: Apparently decorative lawn ornament is most common :eek::eek:. It has no tap root, so is easily transplanted, but as far as lumbering, it's lower branches tend to make it all cranky for regular wood working :cool:

    Other Notes: The Pin Oak was named for those pin-like twigs. *Also named since the leaves tend to stay on the tree through much of winter, like being "pinned up"

    48839517703_cf67c4b084_k.jpg

    I photographed two trees on two different days today being the much wetter of the two :)

    48839189136_bc04b7787c_c.jpg

    I wish the acorn pic had come out better, and although the one at 3 o'clock was clearly from that tree, I was intrigued by the little striped one at 11 o'clock :)

    *thanks @Harper for bonus info :41:

    Onward to Day #4! Have a great night!
    :40::40:
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2019
  25. Harper

    Harper Supporter Supporter

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    I've also heard that it is named that because the tree keeps its leaves "pinned" on until the Spring.
     
  26. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Backyard Bushcrafter Supporter

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    ahh.. yep.. that makes sense :) thanks for following my journey :)
    :40::40:
     
  27. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Backyard Bushcrafter Supporter

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    That's sad :oops::(:oops: I do love having lots of trees to explore and enjoy.

    :40::40:
     
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  28. Forestree

    Forestree Treeforest Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    Good observations and referencing! That’s great your describing the characteristics you used for ID. Great thread, keep it up!
     
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  29. Beach Hiker

    Beach Hiker LNR LB 42 Supporter

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    Lol!
     
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  30. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Backyard Bushcrafter Supporter

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    Whoops! I guess I need TWO today... :)
    Day #4
    Tree: White Ash
    Shape: Large tree with straight trunk and dense, conical or rounded crown.
    48847991233_1c95675a61_k.jpg 48848543972_e23bb30966_k.jpg
    Leaves: Pinnately compound, 8-12" long, with 5-9 (often 7) slightly toothed, longish leaflets which are whitish on the lower surface.
    48848543857_5ce14d2f6e_k.jpg 48848353151_fbbadc4d93_k.jpg 48847990323_674f177ac4_k.jpg 48848353701_3a98bb2871_k.jpg
    Bark:dark gray with a thick deep ridges, furrowed in diamond shaped pattern.
    48848543617_b9679a4257_k.jpg
    Uses: Ash is considered a very valuable lumber wood, since the tree grows tall and straight and is often used in manufacture of sports handles and playground equipment.
    Other Notes: I am fortunate that this part of NJ happens to have the highest density of white ash in a very large area, but unfortunately it is being decimated by the Emerald Ash Borer ("EAB"), and invasive pest bug. I watched a video that confirmed my concern.. pretty much ALL the trees along the street near my office are experiencing some pretty bad dieback of their crowns, and even worse, I learned that what looked like cool outgrowths (known as suckering) of shoots on so many of these trees, is actually sign of stress. 48848544417_4f189b76cc_k.jpg I'll go back next week to see if I can spot the "D" shaped holes that also indicate EAB trouble.

    :40::40:
     

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  31. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Backyard Bushcrafter Supporter

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    Day #5
    Tree: American Beech
    48855539028_c5c0352cac_k.jpg
    Shape: Large tree with rounded crown of many long, spreading and horizontal branches.
    Leaves: Egg shaped and coarse toothed, between 3-6" long, long pointed at tip. Twigs slender, ending in long narrow scaly buds, short side twigs/spurs.
    48855896516_fb5a85187b_k.jpg
    48855896776_9315fe9457_k.jpg
    Bark: Light gray, smooth, thin, susceptible to human carving.
    48856098007_0347da7654_k.jpg 48855899551_e9224e493f_o.jpg
    Fruits: Small triangular nuts surrounded by somewhat spiny bracts.
    American Beech Fruit.jpg
    Uses: Identified by early colonists. Handsome shade tree, with wood that, though only fair, is commonly used for cheap furniture. Important woodland species that supports many animals, including grouse, turkey, deer and black bear.
    9290407552_24960c5cec_b.jpg
    Other Notes: Bear and beech nut not my photos..
    :40::40:
     

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  32. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Backyard Bushcrafter Supporter

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    Day #6
    Tree: Black Tupelo, aka Black Gum, Sour Gum
    48855536843_ff32f8175c_k.jpg
    Shape: Dense conical, sometimes flat tipped crown, many slender, nearly horizontal branches
    Leaves: Glossy, 2-5" long in elliptical or oblong leaves with no teeth, often crowded on short twigs. Shiny green on top, pale and often hairy beneath.
    48855537058_38b4c58d44_k.jpg

    As in my pics, turns bright shiny red in autumn. 48856101787_0f1c7f60b7_k.jpg
    Bark: Gray or dark brown, thick, rough, deeply furrowed into rectangular or irregular ridges.
    Uses:Lumber is useful for furniture and many other wood projects.
    48855536958_f709899848_k.jpg
    Fleshy, bitter, berry like, blue-black fruits are relished by black bear, and many birds including pheasant, grouse and turkey.
    Other Notes: This was as surprise for me and my list of trees! I was intrigued by the arrangement of the shiny leaves, which also had some beautiful color, especially on the way out, when I needed a flash. It also neat because the branches came down low and horizontal, so easy to explore.
    :40::40:
     

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  33. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Backyard Bushcrafter Supporter

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    Day #7
    Tree: American Chestnut
    3027596941_e650cc75c8_k.jpg
    Shape: Currently less usually less than 25' high, these survive mostly as stump sprouts.
    3618925183_b809a6cd1a_b.jpg
    Leaves: large (5-9"), narrowly long, long pointed, hairless with course teeth.
    48855898926_130d3691e1_k.jpg
    48855898831_3f61d7d8ae_k.jpg
    Bark: smooth and gray when young.
    48855541178_ab68cef0ef_k.jpg
    Fruit: When mature enough to bear fruit they grow short stalked burs, 2-2.5" diameter, with branched spines, covering egg shaped shiny dark brown nuts with a flattened side and a point.
    3027595021_faee1dab0b_k.jpg G71_chestnut_1000x536.jpg
    Uses: Historically important woodland tree for edible nuts and hard, long grained valuable wood for lumber, resistant to rot (long dead trunks can still be seen).
    Other Notes: The beloved American Chestnut was once one of the most populated tree in forests. Around 1900, starting in the NYC area, an asian fungus bark disease commonly known as Chestnut blight spread until almost all mature trees were girdled and died. The fungus can survive on other trees until a young Chestnut matures enough for the bark to break open, at which point inevitably, the fungus invades.
    3027597231_a22704f710_k.jpg
    Thanks to organizations like The American Chestnut Foundation and others, progress has been made toward breeding/ genetically altering related asian and european chestnuts with purebred American Chestnuts to bring back the American Chestnuts characteristics (long, straight, hard wood, large crown) to re-populate forests.
    3028433812_e6805d8fca_k.jpg
    Back in 2008, my husband and I were fortunate enough to be able to visit a relatively mature speciman locally. It was shorter but had a beautiful spreading crown, and had plentiful burrs. Sadly it did eventually perish. It's a very sad tale, because even as mere sprouts, it's clear how special and unique this forest treasure was.
    :40::40:
     
  34. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Backyard Bushcrafter Supporter

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    Day #8
    Subject tree on right, and possible in middle...
    48867452716_3a733c0552_k.jpg
    Tree: Scotch Pine
    Shape: Medium height with whorled branches
    48867566477_ae3942e4a2_k.jpg
    Leaves: Needles, 2 in a group, 1.5 - 2.75" long, stiff, slightly flattened, twisted and spreading. Blue-green.
    48866849288_b458ccdb85_k.jpg
    Bark: Reddish brown, thin, shedding in papery or scaly plates.
    48867566762_f4926f7222_k.jpg
    Cones: Egg shaped, pale yell-brown, 1.25-2.5" long, scales think, flattened with minimal prickle.
    48866876898_b9cbba23ed_k.jpg 48867368516_355745687f_k.jpg
    Uses: <<Courtsy of @Harper: When the pine cones are tight, you can put them next to a fire to warm and they will open up to reveal the pine nuts.

    You can also make a tea of the needles which is very rich in Vitamin C. If you put them in honey and let them sit in the sun for a few weeks, you can make an excellent cough syrup.

    Other Notes: This pine is a native to the Scottish Highlands but is the most widely distributed pine in the world. Commonly planted for shelterbelts, and as ornamentals.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2019 at 2:26 PM
  35. Harper

    Harper Supporter Supporter

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    When the pine cones are tight like that, you can put them next to a fire to warm up. They will open and you can get pine nuts.

    Also, you can make a tea of the needles which is very rich in Vitamin C. If you put them in honey and let them sit in the sun for a few weeks, you can make an excellent cough syrup.

    Good stuff to know in a survival situation.
     
  36. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Backyard Bushcrafter Supporter

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    Great info, thanks!

    :40::40:
     
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