72 Hour SAR Pack Loadout

Discussion in 'General Bushcraft Discussion' started by SonsOfLiberty, Jun 11, 2019.

  1. SonsOfLiberty

    SonsOfLiberty Woodsman Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    My SAR 72 Hour Pack- (Minus the Snubby .38--Can't take it on call-outs)

    Everything is pictured except clothing (season specific)
    HMG 8.5 X 10' Dyneema Tarp
    20ft Dyneema cordage
    WM 30F Down Bag
    NeoAir XL Pad
    REI Bivy
    MSR Pocket Rocket nested in Ti Cup
    FAK with full RX/ OTC Meds
    Bushcraft Knife
    BG SFA
    Silky Saw
    Gloves/ Kneepads/ N95 Respirator x 2
    Tinder Box
    GPS/ PLB
    SteriPen/ H2O Tabs
    OFF/ Sunscreen/ Chapstick
    OC Spray for things that don't like me
    2L Bladder (1L Nalgene Not Pictured)
    Surefire 500L/ Surefire Headlamp/ Extra Batteries
    Rite in the Rain pad/ pen/pencil
    Little DMT Sharpener, Marine Tuff Cloth, some Sandpaper
    Wet Wipes
    Signal Mirror/ Flagging Tape
    Surefire Ear Pro
    Compass
    Bic Lighter
    Emergency Fishing Kit (probably not needed, but I just like it)

    All goes into the 40L HMG Pack with plenty of room to spare

    **Not Pictured: Helmet, Harness, Ultralight Rack***

    IMG_6678.jpg
     
  2. Medic17

    Medic17 Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    You looking for a critique? (If not - just ignore me.)

    I would get rid of the Axe, Fishing Kit, and Sharpening Kit.

    Toss the traditional tinder kit for PJ & Cotton Balls.

    Switch out the classic Bushcraft knife for a lighter Mora.
    And the SteriPen for a filter type device.

    Food?
    Stove?
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2019
  3. SonsOfLiberty

    SonsOfLiberty Woodsman Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Yes. Looking for critique. Sorry. Probably should have said that lol.

    Food is Mountain House Dehydrated, Bars, Gu, Other quick carbs. Stove is a pocket rocket

    Yeah I agree with you on the SteriPen. I hesitate to trust stuff that runs on batteries. I haven’t carried a filter in a long time. I used to have a big bulky MSR Ceramic filter. Any recommendations?
     
  4. DCPugh

    DCPugh Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Full size sawyer water filter. Used em for years and work really well.
     
  5. Medic17

    Medic17 Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    Look into switching your food from Mtn House to Backpackers Pantry.
    Lower Sodium, better tasting, higher nutritional value.

    Gorp? Jerky?

    Same with Goo, Cliff Bars- Look into RX Bars and Larabars.

    May want to consider ditching the Pocket Rocket for a simple alcohol stove.
    Lighter, quieter, and less finicky.

    Coffee, Tea, or Hot Coco?
    and then
    Vitalyte or SOS for Rehydration.

    I like Zelphs Fancy Feast stove.
    http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/
    And a custom cut titanium windscreen from this guy.
    https://www.etsy.com/listing/243731...een&ref=sr_gallery-1-1&organic_search_click=1

    Not sure if you have it but a Prusik, 20' Piece of Webbing, and Snap Link.
    May be more versatile over a harness, unless you specifically do rope work.
    If you are on a rope team you probably trained enough to get your own preferences and the last statement should be ignored.
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2019
  6. Snake Doc 415

    Snake Doc 415 Plumb smack-dab right in the middle of nowhere Supporter

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    Sweet kit dude! Maybe some food bars/drink mix for quick sustenance? Something grab-and-go for quick energy. Also, BCUSA signal sack is a lightweight, versatile piece of kit that would go great in a SAR kit. Just my opinion. Looks great man!

    -Snake Doc 415
     
  7. Medic17

    Medic17 Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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  8. 1773

    1773 Supporter Supporter

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    Other than the things already mentioned, I would add a second compass, I have broken more than one when working in rugged terrain, I assume you will add maps when you get to the actual call out location? I would also add a couple 55 gallon garbage bags, a piece of Gorilla tape wrapped around a "hotel key card", and a few gallon zip loc freezer bags it is surprising how often you use them when out and about.

    The biggest problem I see with SAR folks is that many carry way to much gear which in effect slows them down and tires them out quicker, plus the larger pack makes it harder to get around in tight places. It doesn't look like you have fallen into that trap. The big thing for a true 72 hour deployment is sufficient calories to provide sufficient energy to function in addition you will probably be sleep deprived so calories and hydration become even more critical.
     
  9. DarrylM

    DarrylM Supporter Supporter

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    I'm a fan of the MSR Hyperflow. It can be set up to work as a gravity filter or pump.
     
  10. L0NER

    L0NER -Gone Exploring- Supporter

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    This..

    And add 5 feet of duct tape and a few glow sticks and small paper lunch bags. I was trained to use these for clue recovery instead of plastic that can sweat.
     
  11. SonsOfLiberty

    SonsOfLiberty Woodsman Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Right on man. I’m not on mountain rescue but I’m a Type 1 searcher so I have to carry helmet/harness. I just do tiblocs, Texas prussics, a BRD, and some misc biners, runners, and cordalette/webbing. I used to spend a lot of time on the sharp end of the rope a long time ago. Trying to stay on the ground at this point in life
     
  12. SonsOfLiberty

    SonsOfLiberty Woodsman Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Fishing kit is gone. I’m going to add a 55gal contractor bag and some ziplocks and duct tape. Swap the SteriPen for a filter
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2019
  13. SonsOfLiberty

    SonsOfLiberty Woodsman Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Lol yup. You can tell the guys that haven’t spent a lot of time backpacking or climbing by the amount of shit they bring. Guys show with 80L packs. That was me 10 years ago.

    Really great point about calories. I’m going to pack more food.
     
  14. crewhead05

    crewhead05 caffeine, nicotine, knives and nature. Lifetime Supporter Supporter

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    Looks like you have a good start. Ill highlight a few things that may help. SAR kit is extremely terrain dependent so tailor to your environment. One of the biggest things I have found is that I have my full kit ready to go, but as soon as a call goes out and we have details I can start leaving items either at the truck or at your meeting place.

    Also, do a quick 5 minute huddle with your walkers before you set out. Not everyone needs to have a stove, full FAK, SAW or hatchet. These types of items can be shared and spread out among your small groups.

    From your post... my response is in red

    Everything is pictured except clothing (season specific)
    HMG 8.5 X 10' Dyneema Tarp Consider possible a BCUSA SAR MEST tarp in blaze orange. This can work as a signal device too.
    20ft Dyneema cordage
    WM 30F Down Bag Consider just packing appropriate clothing that can be used with a makeshift shelter to keep you warm overnight. A bag may not be necessary.
    NeoAir XL Pad May not be necessary. Pine bows create a nice warm and relatively comfortable bed.
    REI Bivy This combined with a large contractor bag and a tarp make a nice set up for a overnighter
    MSR Pocket Rocket nested in Ti Cup This item can be spread among your ground searchers, not everyone needs one but to to have.
    FAK with full RX/ OTC Meds
    Bushcraft Knife Possibly consider a lighter option. A solid knife with a hand saw can do a lot.
    BG SFA This would be my first leave home item. Only time i would bring it was if I were concerned of dead falls having trapped the search subject. In that case we would haul in small chain saws.
    Silky Saw Silkys are great if used properly, but if you loan it to someone else they can easily snap the blade if they get over aggressive with it. I carry a bahco because of this. They seem to hold up much better to novice use.
    Gloves/ Kneepads/ N95 Respirator x 2
    Tinder Box Keep it simple. A couple long burning firestarters, small ferro rod and mini bic, couple small pieces of fatwood and a big rubbberband is about all I carry
    GPS/ PLB Is PLB required?
    SteriPen/ H2O Tabs I personally dont like steri pens, I prefer a lifestraw type item that can also be used to fill a canteen. Depends on your environment etc. I have lots of good fast flowing water in my area.
    OFF/ Sunscreen/ Chapstick
    OC Spray for things that don't like me
    2L Bladder (1L Nalgene Not Pictured) Tough thing with bladders is keeping them full and ready. If you leave water in them you can get mold build up. If you leave them empty sometimes its hard to find time to fill them before you head out.
    Surefire 500L/ Surefire Headlamp/ Extra Batteries
    Rite in the Rain pad/ pen/pencil
    Little DMT Sharpener, Marine Tuff Cloth, some Sandpaper Not saying it wont happen but i have never had to use a sharpening item on a mission. Also remember your other member should have a blade if you dull yours.
    Wet Wipes
    Signal Mirror/ Flagging Tape
    Surefire Ear Pro I assume for helo OPS? Maybe consider foam ear plugs
    Compass
    Bic Lighter
    Emergency Fishing Kit (probably not needed, but I just like it) Dont need it :)

    All goes into the 40L HMG Pack with plenty of room to spare

    **Not Pictured: Helmet, Harness, Ultralight Rack***

    Food notes:
    -I mostly just carry high calorie bars. Take a look here and choose a few https://exploringwild.com/best-high-calorie-bars-backpacking/
    - I have a variety of electrolyte supplements that I carry and start taking immediately if I think i am going to be walking. As you know you can never be always physically ready for a hard hike. Starting electrolytes and keeping up on them has been key for me.
    - Bullion cubes and jello packets are good to carry. If you have to stay overnight you can boil water and drink both of these. They warm you internally and the bullion keeps your sodium of for hiking. Jello is good for a quick energy. You can also give either to a found subject (depending on your SOPs). A cold lost subject can perk up after a warm jello drink and some food.

    - Honey sticks. These are great to add not only for you but if you encounter a diabetic subject.


    Thats all I can think of for now. As time goes on you can refine what you carry. We do have a SAR sub group here if you aren't aware. https://bushcraftusa.com/forum/forums/search-and-rescue.360/

    Hopefully this helps some
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2019
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  15. crewhead05

    crewhead05 caffeine, nicotine, knives and nature. Lifetime Supporter Supporter

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    I forgot to add.

    My pack always has an additional base layer, insulation layer, pair of wool socks, wool hat, wool gloves. I keep these items in a loksak zip bag. If you have to stay a night after spending all day hiking and sweating, having the ability to change these things makes your night much more tolerable.
     
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  16. SonsOfLiberty

    SonsOfLiberty Woodsman Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Really appreciate the thought-out advice. I'm not new to backcountry travel, but I am fairly new to SAR, and after reading your post I realize I am mixing up mission-necessary gear with gear I like to tinker around with. Example: the Sharpener, old school tinder box, Axe, PLB

    The Axe will 90% be left in the Jeep. In fact, I've never carried it out into the field. My backcountry travel has always just been nuking mountain house meals. Even on multi-day mountaineering trips I don't remember bringing anything for electrolyte loss. Now that I'm older that stuff may play more of an important role. I like the idea about bullion cubes and electrolyte tabs. I carry 10Gallons of water in the jeep that i rotate out every year to fill up at the starting point.
    Surefire ear pro are just foam plugs for air ops.

    I'm going to look at signalling kit. I think thats one area I've overlooked also. Thanks
     
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  17. crewhead05

    crewhead05 caffeine, nicotine, knives and nature. Lifetime Supporter Supporter

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    Great. Ps that jeep in your profile picture is awesome
     
  18. jayclimber

    jayclimber BCUSA Friend Bushcraft Friend

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    First off good on you getting involved in the SAR community and using your outdoor experience for new uses!

    Something lacking is the SAR componemt of your kit...

    -Optics (binoculars, monocular, maybe NV's, or even FLIR) this can make a huge difference in scanning sidelines, tree lines, detecting heat signatures in the woods, etc...
    -Comms (2-way radios, hand held, cell) reliable communications in the field can make a huge difference in the time and efficiency of a conducted search and can help in getting the right people to the right places. All search and rescues set up a command outpost where most communications (info) get routed through so having up to date info is essential to the mission.
    -Navigation (I saw you have a compass) but also need maps of the AO (which should be available the command post set up) along with marking pens and a measuring tool (if its not on your compass baseplate) you may be asked to identify coordinates as to where you find something or need to give those coordinates to a helo/medical crew.
    -Signaling, you got a good start but add a whistle and possibly a couple of pencils flares, even a civilian grade smoke canister (depending on your operating environment) can give quick visual indicators as to your location with a victim.

    Dont be that guy who shows up on a callout ready for a backpacking trip (you look just fine in that regard) but strive to be the guy who shows up ready (gear, knowledge, and training) to carryout the mission at hand. Ive found that adding a small chest pouch to your kit (like a HPG chest bag) is perfect for comms, nav, and optics along with lights, notebook, cordage, knife, a couple of trail snacks, etc that you have at hand while on the go and the rest of your personal kit can remain in your pack.

    Keep up the good work, you're on your way there!
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2019
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  19. Snake Doc 415

    Snake Doc 415 Plumb smack-dab right in the middle of nowhere Supporter

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    This is excellent! Like you said, a full on shelter may not be necessary. IMHO you could use Palmer Furnace or some other “improvised” shelter in this kind of SAR bag. Just a thought though. You may need what you have.:dblthumb:

    -Snake Doc 415
     
  20. Snake Doc 415

    Snake Doc 415 Plumb smack-dab right in the middle of nowhere Supporter

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    One more thing, people have mentioned chemlights a couple times. Good 24 hour chemlights come in surprisingly handy. I keep about 4 ft of paracord around mine so that I can 1. Easily use them as a buzz saw and 2. Tie them to things without fumbling around for cordage. Just a thought. Buzzsaw/markers may be good for an SAR bag.

    -Snake Doc 415
     
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  21. crewhead05

    crewhead05 caffeine, nicotine, knives and nature. Lifetime Supporter Supporter

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    Yes sir, great item to have. Here is the signal kit i put together for our members.

    https://bushcraftusa.com/forum/threads/visual-signal-kits.233968/
     
  22. tomcfitz

    tomcfitz Supporter Supporter

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    @crewhead05 Interesting how much "bushcraft" you recommend doing on a SAR trip. Namely the pine boughs instead of a lightweight pad.

    I'm not a SAR guy at all, but I do try and think that way, since I'm often effectively in charge of 20ish kids, who do dumb stuff all the time, and I may have to find/help one someday.

    I would assume that lightweight is somewhat secondary to "time efficient," where I would pick a foam pad over inflating a pad or building a bed. Bars and cold foods make sense to me, as well as a small tarp instead of a tent, etc etc. Though a quick-setup tent could be worth the slight weight penalty to make it easier to travel some extra distance during the day, ya know?

    Mostly just curious about the logic behind the pine bough bed.
     
  23. Snake Doc 415

    Snake Doc 415 Plumb smack-dab right in the middle of nowhere Supporter

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    With the proper knife and the right technique, you can construct a bough bed in mere minutes. A foam sit pad like you mentioned may be nice, but a full length sleep pad is unneeded.

    -Snake Doc 415
     
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  24. tomcfitz

    tomcfitz Supporter Supporter

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    Right, but even minutes is still longer than the near instant foam pad.
     
  25. woodsranger

    woodsranger Solitude Seeker

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    I dunno, I like the idea of the foam pad if there's room for it and if it doesn't add too much weight. It saves time, you might be in a deciduous forest instead of a coniferous forest (yes, I know, you could still use leaves and branches), it might be raining so you don't want to get wet trying to gather the boughs, and it would be a good thing for the victim/lost hiker to lie on to make them comfortable. But I'm not in SAR, so I really have no idea. Just my thoughts.
     
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  26. crewhead05

    crewhead05 caffeine, nicotine, knives and nature. Lifetime Supporter Supporter

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    If i knew i were spending a night i would carry a foam pad. Rarely have we planned to do that in a search. In my area it would take all of 5 mins to get a big bed of pine bows to keep your butt off the ground. In my mind its probability of the need vs what i can produce efficiently with what i have. I certainly dont discourage a pad if it fits a system or environment better. Just my thoughts on the topic :).
     
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  27. Bobsdock

    Bobsdock So long, and thanks for all the fish Supporter

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    Plus one on the sawyer water filter.
     
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  28. RobbieinME

    RobbieinME Scout

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    Why would you prefer a perifier(steri pen) vs a filter? If you have very turbid water i could see the need. I like the steri pen its fast and it's a perifier vs just a filter.
     
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  29. crewhead05

    crewhead05 caffeine, nicotine, knives and nature. Lifetime Supporter Supporter

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    For me personally. Steripen is another electrical component that could go dead or fail. That is the biggest reason. The second being i feel more comfortable with a filter out of a standing puddle, if that is my only option.
     
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  30. SonsOfLiberty

    SonsOfLiberty Woodsman Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    The SteriPen is awesome for mountaineering trip when you’re melting water and don’t want to waste fuel boiling the water after you melt. Also awesome for camping near clean running water. It’s quick and it works as long as you have batteries. The only downside is it doesn’t do much for nasty turbid water with floaters
     
  31. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    good suggestions thus far :)

    for a 72 hr SAR bag for shelter I would consider a lightweight Apex quilt over a down bag, better than down in wet conditions and w/ a poncho hole can provide additional insulation while stopped (MLD makes a 48 degree quilt w/ optional poncho hole that weighs a scant 12 oz and packs small), I'd ditch the air mattress and go instead for a section of closed cell foam pad- much more bomber, no risk of leaks (for backpacking I love air mattresses, for SAR activities I want bomber)

    HMG makes great gear, but for SAR use I'd definitely go more bomber on the pack- you're very likely be going into areas that are choked full of stuff that could shred dcf; too nice of a pack to get shredded imo

    if your environ includes a lot of thick stuff, instead of an axe, possibly something like the Serchete would be better suited (going to be lighter too)

    regardless of what you choose for filtering, definitely keep a good supply of aquatabs (or like)- they weigh nothing and no electronics to fail, no filter to clog, simply add, wait and drink
     
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  32. SonsOfLiberty

    SonsOfLiberty Woodsman Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I think I may get a Z lite pad for SAR. The foam pad is more versatile even though it’s not nearly as comfortable
     
  33. jayclimber

    jayclimber BCUSA Friend Bushcraft Friend

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    Plus 1 for the Z pad. Ive used one ever since they came out. Can be folded for a sit/kneeling pad, makeshift splinting (the folds are almost perfect for that), and it can be used to beef up the r-factor for a winter sleep system. They also work well for padding/insulation in plastic and metal litters as well as in sleds.
     
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  34. UAHiker

    UAHiker Guide

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    good suggestions thus far :)

    i'll start off by saying i'm not in SAR but would love to be involved.

    i'll 2nd carrying a back up chemical treatment is definitively a plus. if you have heard of it great for a group set up check out P&G Pur water packets (see below for video and website). i'd also agree with a machete if your in a thick environment that requires more hacking than chopping. check out the tramontina machete, requires some mods but light weight and a great tool. Pict did several great videos on the mods he did and how great of a tool they are even in the hardwoods of MI.

    agree'd with others on the foam pad, and synthetic insulation over down, especially in a wet environment and if your going to keep in a bag don't have to worry that much about the insulation being compressed like down and loosing it's loft.

    i think others have covered food and hydration pretty well.

    you may want to consider carrying a SOL blanket/bivy as well they really do work and can be used on the victim to help warm up if cold when found. speaking of which if you can afford it carry a few extra's for them, like energy bars, ect.. more than likely they are going to be thirsty, hungry, and cold. granted they will more than likely be extremely happy to see a rescuer but having a few comforts beyond will through them over the edge and be even happier i'd think :)

    here's the links and video:
    purchase: https://dayoneresponse.com/store/pg-packets-12-pack/
    about: https://csdw.org/pg-purifier-of-water-packets
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2019
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  35. Pinelogcreek

    Pinelogcreek Supporter Supporter

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  36. Snake Doc 415

    Snake Doc 415 Plumb smack-dab right in the middle of nowhere Supporter

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    Great kit and great suggestions!

    One more thing I thought of: a whistle. Light, loud, and indispensable. Even if you aren’t the one getting rescued, still good to have.

    I used mine hiking last fall. My family and I were hiking in a canyon. My mom and brother decided to stay at an agreed upon point while my dad and I went on to scout. Well, we come back and they’re not there. Out of shouting distance. Couple puffs on the rescue howler, 30 seconds apart, and they come stumbling back through the trees. They went to “find us” and got turned around.:25:

    Anyways, a whistle may come in handy.:dblthumb:

    -Snake Doc 415
     
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  37. crewhead05

    crewhead05 caffeine, nicotine, knives and nature. Lifetime Supporter Supporter

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    Absolutely. I like the fox40 sonic whistle but anything loud will do. Good catch on this.
     
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  38. jayclimber

    jayclimber BCUSA Friend Bushcraft Friend

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    Plus 1 for the SOL tarp and/or bivy! I carry the tarp for just that scenario. Another inexpensive bivy for warming a victim is the TACT Bivy...

    https://www.amazon.com/Bivvy-Compact-Ultra-Lightweight-Sleeping/dp/B07C45T3Z8

    I recently started carrying this in my kit and really like it. Packs up to the size of your fist.
     
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  39. JKR

    JKR Scout

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    Like this, Thanks for posting!
     
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  40. Glenn Rowe

    Glenn Rowe Supporter Supporter

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    Back in Dixie, in the mid- to late-1980s, I got my 3-day rig down to 26 lbs including two quarts of water and a First Need filter. I carried it on a cut-down external frame that didn't extend much above my shoulders, for bushwhacking purposes. I could extend it to a 5-day rig just by adding food and another shirt.
     
  41. SonsOfLiberty

    SonsOfLiberty Woodsman Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Forgot to mention , I have a Fox 40 strapped to my shoulder strap
     
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  42. SonsOfLiberty

    SonsOfLiberty Woodsman Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I need to get some orange signaling devices. I’m thinking about cutting up three old orange synthetic shirts and tying off some string to them to signal the airship
     
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  43. crewhead05

    crewhead05 caffeine, nicotine, knives and nature. Lifetime Supporter Supporter

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    Check out a napa or carquest. They make heavy mesh flagging for tying on to extended loads that are cheap, heavy duty, and light weight.
     
  44. Glenn Rowe

    Glenn Rowe Supporter Supporter

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  45. SonsOfLiberty

    SonsOfLiberty Woodsman Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I had a katabatic quilt. Couldn’t do it. I sleep in my side and could never get comfortable. My WM bag weighs like nothing. HMG pack is GTg. They’re customer service is too notch too big you shred it they will replace it. It’s happened before with their thinner dcf that they used to use
     
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  46. arleigh

    arleigh Guide

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    On all my searches I slept once on an official event and that was next to the vehicle guarding the plane crash site , other wise we almost never slept on a search . That meant hiking all night and finishing the search before going back to the SO . often going right strait back to work .
    Only rarely did any one draw from my gear ,and I was usually the only one carrying gear. some didn't even cary a knife .
    There have been over lapping events so leaving stuff behind is not always good but then again ,rarely did any one need any thing .
    Sheriffs radios are usually pathetic so many of us got our ham ticket and that made up the difference . big difference .
    I carried almost every single event , some one had to be reliable and I hated being caught with my pants down.
    So even if you wind up being the only one carrying if things do go wrong all your gear will be shared . Which means if you pack cheap , it's disappointing.
    If in some event you are requested to stay in position on trail alone, you then are prepared to do so.
     
  47. Snake Doc 415

    Snake Doc 415 Plumb smack-dab right in the middle of nowhere Supporter

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    BCO Signal Sack! I have one and it is becoming one of my “essential” kit items. So many uses, you cannot go wrong.

    -Snake Doc 415
     
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  48. jayclimber

    jayclimber BCUSA Friend Bushcraft Friend

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    Had a similar issue a few months back. Local search for an ederly male with dimentia. Local command had comms set up but police, fire, parks, and the bird in the air weren't on the same frequency and the bird and police were still searching an hour after the guy was found and the search was called off. I was searching our AO where he was last seen and monitoring all channels because I had asked the question at the operations base what frequency comms were on and I got a funny look... That search was an example of how not to conduct a search.
     
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  49. SonsOfLiberty

    SonsOfLiberty Woodsman Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    0569C2A4-ADFD-4065-9203-6164A38DCCAA.jpeg I’m a General class Ham (but new to ham radio in general) Lots of guys on our team carry personal radios. Our SO SAR communicates on channels that are off the ham bands for whatever reason.

    I threw some12hr chem lights in my pack with some baggies for evidence and I’m going to research bco signaling kit and other alternatives. Thanks guys
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2019
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