Adventure Sworn or LT Wright?

Discussion in 'Edged Tools' started by Ducksandcuse, Sep 11, 2018.

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LT WRIGHT GNS OR ADVENTURE SWORN MOUNTAINEER

  1. MOUNTAINEER

    28 vote(s)
    63.6%
  2. GNS 3v

    8 vote(s)
    18.2%
  3. GNS O1

    8 vote(s)
    18.2%
  1. Ducksandcuse

    Ducksandcuse Tracker

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    hey all, I've been looking to get a new bushcraft knife, I want a scandi woodlore style blade. I'm between an adventuresworn mountaineer o1 or a LT Wright GNS in 3v

    I currently use a Bark River gunny in 3v but it likes to chip out.

    in your opinion what's the better knife AND why??

    also why do so many bushcrafters seem to choose o1 over 3v or any other steel? if it rust so easy and dulls fast.
     
  2. freebirdfb

    freebirdfb Bushmaster

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    No experience with the knives, but for the O1, it is a good steel, like other carbon steels I don't think it dulls fast. Stropping or ran over a butchers steel on occasion is good enough to keep the edge sharp and when it does dull a few spies on a diamond stone brings it right back. My favorite steel thus far is 52100. It holds a good edge, gets sharp and resists rust rather well while allowing a patina to form.
     
  3. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Guide

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    The AS blade I had a chance to handle a couple years back has always stood out as the best fit and finish I've ever seen on any knife. It truly was beautiful. I had a BHK once upon a time, it was the exact opposite story. I cleaned up quite a few issues on the grinds, and shape including a blunt tip. For me it would be AS hands down but in reality I just use a Mora.
     
  4. Pastor Chris

    Pastor Chris Keeper of the T.Darrah Tenkara Pass-Around Hobbyist Supporter Bushcraft Friend Hardwoodsman Bushclass II

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    AS all the way!
     
  5. CoolBreeze135

    CoolBreeze135 Scholarly Woodsman Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    LTWK makes some great knives, don't get me wrong. However, AS is the next level.

    I find it really weird that your 3V Gunny has problems with chipping. I've used several Barkies in 3V and never had a single chip. May want to contact their warranty department.

    I would choose 3V over O1 10 times out of 10. Better edge holding, more stainless, and super tough. What's not to love?
     
  6. Mr. Tettnanger

    Mr. Tettnanger Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I’ve owned a lot of knives from various makers. I’ve had a few dozen AS over the years. I had various models. The Mountaineer was probably one of, or most comfortable handles I ever had. It felt like an extension of my hand. Ideal really.


    I enjoyed my AS knives ecspecially the Mountaineer. I’ve since moved on from them.

    You may want to consider availability, cost and wait times though.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2018
  7. nograveconcern

    nograveconcern Guide Bushclass I

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    Hold them both. I had a couple GNS and just recently sold my Mountaineer, cutting back the collection to fund the shop.

    I liked the smooth feel of the GNS better but the finish of the my Mountaineer was another level.

    3v should be slightly less rust prone and tougher than O1, though it's still not stainless. The finer finish of the AS will help resist rusting too. If your 3v is chipping out it could be ground to too fine an angle for the grain of the steel, or something wrong with that knife.

    I've personally no issue with simple carbon steels either though. O1 is fine with me. 80crv2, 5160, whatever's clever. I like the knife for the knife.

    Either one is a great choice.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2018
  8. JasonJ

    JasonJ Guide

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    Agreed. I hear 52100 can be a pain to work with when forging it, however. But if doing stock removal, or for the user afterwards, it's great!

    5160 spring steel is great too, O1 is a tried and true carbon tool steel, much like 1095. It just works. Easily sharpened, holds edge long enough... I haven't seen issues with it rusting easily, no easier than any other carbon steel.

    Either knife will do you just fine... I think they both have close to the same blade lengths too, don't they? Around 4.5" or so...?
     
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  9. Kona9

    Kona9 Supporter Supporter

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    I believe some of the reasons O1 is so popular is the cost, toughness, ability to be easily sharpened in the field, ability to get a patina, and lastly it works well when processing wood. If cutting different harder materials other steels I’m sure are better. I’ve never owned a bladekin 3v no have I owned an AS knife so can’t help you with that comparison.
     
  10. charlesmc2

    charlesmc2 Scout

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    I think most of us have a sense of which knife feels (and looks) right for you. If a knife doesn't seem right, it will not be, at least for some time. I'd say, go with the one that calls you!
     
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  11. Brommeland

    Brommeland Scout

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    I've owned 5 LT Wrights - had edge retention issues with 4 of them. The 5th I could never really get sharp to begin with. I've never even seen an AS knife "in person", but I'd buy one sight unseen before another LT Wright....
     
  12. Top Gibson

    Top Gibson Supporter Supporter

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    I've never had any problems with LT Wright's knives or BHK.....and I prefer O1.....but heck, I still like my two $8 Mora's as well....;):dblthumb:
     
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  13. Ragman

    Ragman Supporter Supporter

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    It's all about the grind.
    Since you want a scandi go with the AS hands down. If you wanted something different I would say go GNS in saber, I love mine.
    The AS scandi is set at a better angle and you will not get the convexed micro bevel that will come on the GNS.
    You can always put a micro bevel on your Mountaineer but that should be up to you in IMO.
    I have owned both knives.
     
  14. boomchakabowwow

    boomchakabowwow Guide

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    I’m not proficient enough with words to describe how sharp my AS knife is. I’ve only stropped it to keep it there. I’ve run it thru game animal joints with glee.

    BUT: I’m over the typical bushie blades. scandi grinds mostly.
     
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  15. Ducksandcuse

    Ducksandcuse Tracker

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    thanks for all the input! the AS definitely seems like the right knife for me, it seems like o1 is a good knife steel. I was always under the impression it wasn't all that great
     
  16. Bryan King

    Bryan King Hobbyist Hobbyist

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    I've got a few knives in O1 and one I've had for a year in 3V. 3v is harder to sharpen holds great edge no rust, but I personally prefer O1 , easy to sharpen , hold good edge but does rust so you've got to keep after it pic below top is a Blackfeather in O1. Bottem Koster Bushmaster 3V. Sorry about pic quality. IMG_20180911_202709.jpg
     
  17. riokid87

    riokid87 Scout

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    I think you should consider making one yourself. Get a piece of a2 from the new Jersey steel baron. It comes anneiled aka soft. The bushcraft blade profile is fairly simple and would not be hard to work out with a hacksaw, couple files, and a real simple jig you can make real easy. Look up knife fileing jig on YouTube. Aaron gough (sp) has a good vid on how to make and use one. You're heat treat will cost about 40. How polished depends on how fine a grit sandpaper you want. 2500 wet dry leaves a real shinny blade. Pick out a figured maple board from hardware store. Use 24 hr epoxie, countersink the holes for your pins slightly, peen 3/16 dis brass rod pins in to secure it with the epoxie. A foot square bolt of leather from Tandy ain't much. A little contact cement and patience goes a long way. I bet you could do a real nice job and the professionally heat treated a2 will be awesome. But wear breathing mask while sanding, esp if you choose Micarta or g10 for a handle
     
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  18. JasonJ

    JasonJ Guide

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    Curious as to what lead you to that impression?
     
  19. nograveconcern

    nograveconcern Guide Bushclass I

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    Hmm...Guess Duck's standard for "all that great" must be quite high (not to pick on you). O1 'tis widely considered a good knife steel as well as a go-to for tooling. Ie. chisels and planes and such.

    Or maybe we've, as a community, created an inflated sense of steel elitism and now O1 just isn't any good anymore in some folks minds.

    Again, a good knife steel is one that does knife things (cut, sharpen) and holds up to the expected performance parameters. So what are your performance goals?

    Mine are as follows:
    1 - Take a fine edge
    2 - Be tough
    3 - Field sharpen easily

    That can be met by any simple carbon steel. 1075, 1080, 1084, 80crv2, 5160, 1095, 52100, O1 , but more so the simpler ones at the start due to the finer grain structure from the lower carbon.

    If your goals include these:
    Go months without sharpening
    Go without rust maintenance

    Then the above simple steels aren't for you.
     
  20. Ducksandcuse

    Ducksandcuse Tracker

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    I have been told that 01 tool steel is very soft and needs to be sharpened after each use, I was told you need to sharpen it so much you will wear the edge back. but now that I'm researching it seems that was either incorrect or poorly heat treated steel
     
  21. GoKartz

    GoKartz Sharpaholic

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    It depends. Any knife, if sharpened enough, will wear the edge back. A high use knife with lower edge retention (such as O1) will need to be sharpened more often and show more wear than a high use knife with high edge retention (such as Cruwear). More sharpening = more the edge will be worn back = happens sooner. O1 does not have particularly high edge retention, so all those are true. “Soft” isn’t really all that accurate, because it can be beat treated to any hardness and is normally in the 58-60 range, although I’ve also seen it in the 54-56 range.
     
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  22. Gumbi

    Gumbi Guide Bushclass I

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    If he's used to 3v, and that's all he knows I could see how he could come to that conclusion.

    I personally have not used any super steels, but I really like O1 and A2. I probably like A2 a little better because it doesn't rust quite as easily.
     
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  23. VtBlackDog

    VtBlackDog Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    I tried a GNS, scandi, matte finish....the level of finish was just crude...also it was really handle heavy....the finish on the primary was like 150 grit belt sanded, if a $10 Mora can be polished then a $200 knife should look at least as good.

    Matte=sloppy
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2018
  24. americanstrat98

    americanstrat98 Wanderer Bushcraft Friend

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    I've had an AS Classic and a BHK and a couple of LT Wright blades. The AS as mentioned has a very good finish. The LT's are not as refined and their price reflects that. I would go with whatever your heart desires.

    Personally in Scandi grind knives I like softer steels like 01, 80CRV2, or A2. Since there is more steel to remove to correct rolls and chips, it takes enough of my time already to get them back to a keen edge. Unless you are carving a seasoned oak totem you should not have to re sharpen any of the steels I've mentioned half way through a project. That guy was correct in stropping his knife before each project though. Its like checking the oil in your vehicle, it can only help.

    In the end I shyed away from sculpted grips for my carving/bushcraft needs. I sold my AS Classic, and purchased an LT Weight Genesis in flat grind for general use. I still have Scandi ground knives, but they are more straight gripped. I have a few Puukko, a SET M1, and a Terava 110.

    Whatever you choose, good luck to you. You probably won't stop there. ;)
     
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  25. dbltap45acp

    dbltap45acp Scout

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    I’ve owned two L.T. Knives, one had no issues, the second one I sent back and was told they would fix it it. I received it back two weeks later and the issue wasn’t even touched. I have three AS Knives and love them. I had an issue with one and Cody took far better care of me then any maker normally would. I say AS all day long
     
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  26. woodsranger

    woodsranger Scout

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    I can't understand people saying that the finish on their LT Wright is crude. I have a Bushcrafter HC, which is their very inexpensive knife, and the fit and finish are absolutely flawless. But, like anything else, I'm sure less than perfect examples slip through from time to time.
     
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  27. dbltap45acp

    dbltap45acp Scout

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    Mine looked nice enough, but the last half inch of the edge near the top wasn’t sharp. And when I say not sharp I mean needed a lot of steel removed to even have an apex. And when I sent it back to be corrected the edge wasn’t touched. That annoyed me a bit. So I sold it at a discount to someone that had the time and will to fix it. The guy said he went though and destroyed two water stones to fix it. It really needed a belt sander to work that edge properly. Haven’t seen anything like that come out of AS shop
     
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  28. Brommeland

    Brommeland Scout

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    One of my LT Wrights was also a Buschrafter HC. It took me hours on a bench strop covered in sandpaper to get that thing to cut. Horrifically poor edge geometry. Once I was finished with it, that knife did cut well, but the edge retention was lacking....To their credit, they offered me a refund (which in retrospect I should have taken), but I saw it as a challenge to fix it (I like to learn and experience stuff "hands on"). What I learned was that a $10 Mora right out of the box cuts better than any LT Wright knife that I've owned.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2018
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