All Use Mountain Bike?

Discussion in 'Transportation' started by Watcher of the Woods, Jul 4, 2019.

  1. Odie

    Odie Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2017
    Messages:
    337
    Likes Received:
    820
    I haven't had my derailleur fail, but I've destroyed two hangers within about a 3 month span.

    I got lucky with my past couple spills. One only resulted in a bent brake lever, which was easily bent back. The other only resulted in a a few bumps and scrapes... and a dislocated shoulder, which was easily slipped back in place, but no bike damage. :D

    Never broke a chain.
     
    M.Hatfield, GeoKrpan and Jeffa like this.
  2. Jeffa

    Jeffa Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2015
    Messages:
    197
    Likes Received:
    882
    I live in Sacramento. She drove from Sacramento to steamboat Colorado. Then she came back to new Mexico to pick me up. She remodeled the kitchen while I was gone by herself. So she was on her own adventure. You know the record for this trail is 13 days. It blows my mind how someone could do it. You can go off route and get on a road, but a road might be 60 miles away. And dragging your bike for 20 miles a day for three days gets ya to the road Haha. Heath wise I was fine, but your heart beats so hard at night trying to get rid of the acid build up in your legs and body, you have to put your feet up. I didnt ride everyday. I stopped at the toaster house for two days in new Mexico. And spent 2 days in steamboat with my wife. Sometimes you find a place you want to stay, but really you have to keep moving or you will run out of food. Burning 6 to 8 thousand calories a day is a lot of food to try and carry.

    The mud pools in the valleys and where there is that much mud there is little water. I guess it's hard to explain. The mud is like penut butter. Not like puddle mud and its everywhere. If you wanted to stop for a day in the sprinkle you could collect some water, but that's another day without food. You also think that just over the next hill the road might get better and you can get out of there, so you just keep moving.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2019
    M.Hatfield, Odie and GeoKrpan like this.
  3. GeoKrpan

    GeoKrpan Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2011
    Messages:
    3,695
    Likes Received:
    2,582
    Location:
    Westlake Village, SoCaL
    Rhinodillos really work. I have used many different tire liners and they are the ones to get. Unfortunately they don't make them for 29+.
    Well, the tires lasted 2500 miles, pretty good. I'd be inclined to use a heavy tire with lotsa' meat. Sounds like your chain and cassette were worn. Cheap enough to change it and the cassette before a ride like that. Good tip about the drain hole. I think that if I found myself in muddy conditions I'd execute plan B.

    I have a Velo Orange Piolet, similar in concept to the Fargo, steel frame and fork, room for up to 29 x 3 tires. I had been using it as a commuter but I got a new uber light alu and carbon commuter. BTW the new bike has a better ride, Piolet way too overbuilt. Anyway, the Piolet is idle so I decided to put a Bafang mid-drive electric motor kit on it.
    Since it will be electrified I will run Maxxis Hookworm 29 x 2.5 tires. They weigh 1200 grams but with 1500 watts, no problem. They ought to tame the ride.
     
    M.Hatfield, Odie and Jeffa like this.
  4. GeoKrpan

    GeoKrpan Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2011
    Messages:
    3,695
    Likes Received:
    2,582
    Location:
    Westlake Village, SoCaL
    YOU have a GREAT wife. I was born in Sacto, father's side of family from there. They had a construction company, Krpan Bros, Inc. for decades, competed with Teichert. Their yard was at Power Inn and Folsom, the family farm they moved to in the 193os. They are all deceased but the house is stll there. For many years a gigantic double bucket line trencher sat next to Folsom Blvd. You may have seen it.

    13 days, unbelieveable. I Googled Toaster House. I can't remember his name now but there was a famous offroad ultra distance cyclist who's favorite food was canned cake frosting because nothing had more calories per ounce. His motto was calories are calories.
     
    M.Hatfield, Odie and Jeffa like this.
  5. Jeffa

    Jeffa Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2015
    Messages:
    197
    Likes Received:
    882
    I want a plus bike. I'd like to do the lost coast trail on a plus bike. Have you heard of that trail? I know all those names my wife and I have done construction management, she works for swinterton, so we know that tea well.
    Canned frosting would do the trick Haha
    By the end of the divide trail I was down 30 lbs and all I could eat was gummy worms and peach rings
     
  6. squishware

    squishware Troubleshooter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2010
    Messages:
    968
    Likes Received:
    5,389
    Location:
    Carlsbad, CA
    Can I get details on the bottle holders on your bars, please?
     
    M.Hatfield, Odie and GeoKrpan like this.
  7. Jeffa

    Jeffa Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2015
    Messages:
    197
    Likes Received:
    882
  8. Manzi1

    Manzi1 Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2018
    Messages:
    155
    Likes Received:
    561
    I have about 7,000 km's on a specialized awol, all steel no suspension. Ride it on tarmac, off road, single track, trails, everywhere. Put schwalbe tires on it. Great bike
     
    M.Hatfield, GeoKrpan and Odie like this.
  9. GeoKrpan

    GeoKrpan Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2011
    Messages:
    3,695
    Likes Received:
    2,582
    Location:
    Westlake Village, SoCaL
    I know where the Lost Coast is but I didn't know there was a dirt option. 29+ is great. My 29+ can accommodate 26 x 4 fatbike wheels. So, a fatbike should be able to accommodate 29 x 3 wheels. I was going to ask, how much weight did you lose?

    My dad's family grew up in the Great Depression era. His father would hand him two rocks which meant to get some rabbits for the dinner table. He told me the story of a guy who vowed to eat fish from the American River to save money. After a few days he tried to bring the fish to his mouth but it was like an invisible hand prevented him from doing so. They were tight with money. They used to make their own 6' diameter concrete pipe. They had a steel mold, vibrator, and cement mixer. I used to watch them do it when I was a kid. No one would do that today. The hardest workers that I ever saw. My aunt said the streets he worked were always the least flooded. He was a great outdoorsman. Slept under a canvas tarp, toted a cast iron frying pan, carried dressed deer carcasses on his back through miles in the mountains. No lightweight nothing, no Goretex, no Nike. One time we were sleeping under a folded tarp and he sprang up to throw a rock, klling a squirrel first try. My twin brother and I were greatly impressed. We used to hunt gigantic frogs and rabbits in the Teichert gravel pits, now a park. One day the security guard confiscated his .22 cal rifle, end of an era.
     
    M.Hatfield and Odie like this.
  10. Jeffa

    Jeffa Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2015
    Messages:
    197
    Likes Received:
    882
    Thats a great story. Fantastic. They used to make real men back in the day. I grew up in Oklahoma and you would hunt deer out of the front yard, or road hit deer was more common then hunting. Raccoon, possum, we did have many squirls. I love sleeping under a tarp more then a tent. I was going to tarp the divide, but greyhound lost all my gear (EXPENSIVE GEAR) and I had to spend a week looking for it from Vancouver back to sac and I bought the tent during that time, camping around looking for my bag. So I just took the tent with me. I got dropped in Vancouver with nothing but my bike. That was fun.
    I lost 30 lbs by the end.



     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2019
    M.Hatfield, Odie and GeoKrpan like this.
  11. Odie

    Odie Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2017
    Messages:
    337
    Likes Received:
    820
    Any thoughts on mullet bikes (29 front/27.5 rear)? Some EWS riders say that the rear end is more playful with the smaller wheel, but the 29 up front gives a little more clearance.

    I find it interesting because that's how dirt bikes have been forever, so it's about time someone did it with a mountain bike.
     
    M.Hatfield, GeoKrpan and Jeffa like this.
  12. Odie

    Odie Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2017
    Messages:
    337
    Likes Received:
    820
    M.Hatfield, GeoKrpan and Jeffa like this.
  13. SkipJunkie

    SkipJunkie Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2018
    Messages:
    699
    Likes Received:
    3,041
    I have a Schwinn High Sierra frame build I did years ago . My answer to a out of my price range touring bike . 26" semi smooth tread pattern on 2.5" Serfas Drifter tires . Fenders , panniers . Racks the whole nine yards . A lot of the bits and bobs I felt needed to upgraded were inexpensively had for nothing more than a contribution of pennies on the dollar of their actual worth to the bike co-op . I ended up going with butterfly bars after much trial and error . It's as good to date as any high priced tourer I've ridden on and off road within reason .
     
    M.Hatfield, Odie and GeoKrpan like this.
  14. GeoKrpan

    GeoKrpan Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2011
    Messages:
    3,695
    Likes Received:
    2,582
    Location:
    Westlake Village, SoCaL
    Back in the day when 29ers were the latest thing, Trek came out with a 96er or 69er, 29" wheel up front, 26" wheel on the rear, didn't last long.
    Back in that day there was a raging 29 vs 26 controversy. The weight weeners were in an uproar. But we know how it turned out. 29ers did to 26ers what The Beatles did to Elvis.
    I see 27.5ers as a carryover of that controversy. I say, bigger is better, especially as I ride a no suspension bike.
     
    M.Hatfield, Odie and SkipJunkie like this.
  15. Pablo

    Pablo Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2010
    Messages:
    1,368
    Likes Received:
    1,116
    No... you don't have to spend 2-3k for a mountain bike. Not. At. All. Here's the deal: Some things matter a great deal: fit, a strong/light frame, decent rims and solid brakes. But you absolutely don't have to spend that much. Sure, a 3k bike may ride like an absolute dream on the trail, but the difference is really in technique more than anything. My first trip to the famed trails around Moab Utah was back in '89... on a hardtail Rockhopper with a solid front fork. We rode hard, had a great time, and learned how to manage that level of bike on what is arguably some of the roughest terrain around. Would it be much easier and comfortable on a top of the line, modern bike? Absolutely. But you can put together a solid bike for under $1,000 that would be more than up to the task. Used bikes might be the way to go, or go with a new, name brand (Specialized, Trek, etc.), and look at their mid-range bikes. First and foremost is a quality frame. Aluminum or full Chrome-Moly. Everything else can upgraded later if you need to. Don't worry too much about all the dudes with their bazillion-dollar bikes in your mecca either. My brother (a professional drummer) gave me some great advice once when I was lamenting my cheap drum set: "some guys play it... and some guys polish it" (well, of course, some guys do play it AND polish it, but you get the idea) One of the best mountain bikers I knew in college (Colorado State) absolutely tore up the trails on...(get this) a Huffy from Walmart! (no, DO NOT buy a Huffy!) It was all he could afford though, and he ripped up the trails around Horsetooth Mountain park. He "played it" better than anyone else I knew... beat the daylights out of that bike, broke everything on it at least once... and kept on riding.

    Finally, a mt. bike is really versatile. The post above (somewhere up there) showing the Raleigh with racks, fenders, extra rims/tires, etc. is spot-on. My '88 Rockhopper still pulls "town bike" duty dressed in similar "clothing". For groceries I use a second-hand Burley kids trailer. I can haul a lot of stuff with little effort. Happy bike hunting... have fun!
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2019
  16. SkipJunkie

    SkipJunkie Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2018
    Messages:
    699
    Likes Received:
    3,041
    I whole heatedly agree on the no suspension point . My limited "Hardcore" riding many moons ago was all done with rigid frames . My other bike for shredding through town at a quicker ??? pace . Hopping an occasional curb and cutting across a field and so on while wearing a backpack is a trek 930 I believe the designation is . My Cannondale Road bike has seen the least use of all my bikes .
     
    M.Hatfield, Odie, Jeffa and 1 other person like this.
  17. GeoKrpan

    GeoKrpan Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2011
    Messages:
    3,695
    Likes Received:
    2,582
    Location:
    Westlake Village, SoCaL
    Shame about your gear.

    The area of my dad's family home was known as Perkins. The Perkins family home was adjacent on the Eastern end. I would catch a glimpse of the Perkins every now and then. There was a shrine in their yard to a son or daughter who died young. The house is long gone. The original family house was built in the 1800s and was rumored to have been a Pony Express station. The present house was buit in the early 60s with lumber from Perkin's Lumber which was owned by my uncle, Bud Krueger. They built the house themselves. They didn't let someone else build it because, "they would put one nail where there should be two". The house was well built but is now dilapitated. Their chidren and grandchildren are worthless, would have my aunts and uncles rolling in their graves.

    Between the family home and the Raley's is was a little grocery store. My grandmother would walk down there every day with a wheeled basket. We'd go with her. She did her shopping and just before she checked out she said, treat, which meant to get a soda. Squirt or Quench was my favorite and nothing ever tasted so good on a hot Sacramento summer day. The Raley's got built and the little store closed after many years in business. We'd walk to the Raley's after that. My grandmother, a Croatian immigrant, never drove and I believe she preferred to walk.
     
    M.Hatfield, Odie and Jeffa like this.
  18. Myr1ad

    Myr1ad Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2014
    Messages:
    971
    Likes Received:
    2,213
    Location:
    NE Massachusetts
    I just acquired a BMW cruiser bicycle . The components on it are all amazing but it is older. I was thinking of making it into an all around bike. Add knobbie tires, but should I worry about upgrading the brakes. It has wheel clamp style breaks. How crazy is the process of converting to disc breaks, or should I just leave it as is? Or should I leave it alone for street use and use my Raleigh Mojave 2.0 for dirt.
     
  19. Pablo

    Pablo Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2010
    Messages:
    1,368
    Likes Received:
    1,116
    Regarding the evolution of mountain bike tech: One thing riding technical trails on an unsuspended bike will teach you is good technique. A fully-suspended bike with 29" rims and disc brakes can crash over almost anything. A hardtail with 26" rims teaches you to finesse your way down technical trails. Speed isn't the issue here, it's picking a good line and using your body with the bike to make it happen without breaking you or the bike. I really value the endless miles I spent on singletrack with my unsuspended Rockhopper. It's kind of like learning to navigate with maps and a basic Silva compass versus GPS. You learn a lot more and become a better navigator.
     
  20. GeoKrpan

    GeoKrpan Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2011
    Messages:
    3,695
    Likes Received:
    2,582
    Location:
    Westlake Village, SoCaL
    Even though suspension is highly developed now, riding no suspension is still a "thing".
    There was a revival when 29ers were introduced, then it died, then 29+ revived it, has died again.
     
    M.Hatfield, Odie and Jeffa like this.
  21. GeoKrpan

    GeoKrpan Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2011
    Messages:
    3,695
    Likes Received:
    2,582
    Location:
    Westlake Village, SoCaL
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2019 at 9:34 AM
    M.Hatfield, Odie and Jeffa like this.
  22. Jeffa

    Jeffa Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2015
    Messages:
    197
    Likes Received:
    882
    They have great deals. I have a motobecane aluminium version of this bike. I got it RIGHT BEFORE I broke my leg last year haha. I had to stare at it for 6 months before I could ride it.

     
    M.Hatfield, Odie and GeoKrpan like this.
  23. GeoKrpan

    GeoKrpan Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2011
    Messages:
    3,695
    Likes Received:
    2,582
    Location:
    Westlake Village, SoCaL
    It's saying something about you if you have the sense to shop at BD.

    Sorry about your leg. I have been suffering with a separated shoulder for two months. A cyclist chick knocked me off my bike and rode away!

    Funny, BD has this bike with aluminum frame, carbon fork, quick releases not thru-axles for $1499, $100 more. I don't get it.
    It's a plenty good bike but why would you buy it over the carbon bike? I see the carbon bike is already sold out in the two largest sizes.

    PS I just noticed the chainstays are asymmetrical on the carbon bike. The right stay is lower to reduce chain slap. Neither bike has a clutch rear derailleur that can handle a 42 tooth cog.

    http://www.bikesdirect.com/products...e-roadbikes/turinoteam-discbrake-roadbike.htm

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2019 at 3:15 PM
    M.Hatfield, Jeffa and Odie like this.
  24. Odie

    Odie Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2017
    Messages:
    337
    Likes Received:
    820
    Jeffa, M.Hatfield and GeoKrpan like this.
  25. GeoKrpan

    GeoKrpan Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2011
    Messages:
    3,695
    Likes Received:
    2,582
    Location:
    Westlake Village, SoCaL
    I've bought so many bikes over the past 30 years.

    When a bike exceeds my expectations, that's the best. When it's below expectations, that's the worst.

    I've had expensive bikes that were a total disappointment, cheap ones that I loved. A high end bike does not necessarily mean you'll be happy with it.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2019 at 4:37 PM
    M.Hatfield, Jeffa and Odie like this.
  26. GeoKrpan

    GeoKrpan Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2011
    Messages:
    3,695
    Likes Received:
    2,582
    Location:
    Westlake Village, SoCaL
    Here's the geometry chart for the above Motobecane carbon gravel bike.

    Forget about what I said earlier about the two largest sizes being sold out. The sizing on this bike is non-traditional.

    There is only 4 sizes equating to Small, Medium, Large, and Extra Large.

    I normally get a 58cm bike but in this bike I'd get a 52cm, Large.

    upload_2019-7-11_13-33-52.png
     
    M.Hatfield and Odie like this.
  27. squishware

    squishware Troubleshooter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2010
    Messages:
    968
    Likes Received:
    5,389
    Location:
    Carlsbad, CA
    Carbon frames wear out.
     
  28. Odie

    Odie Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2017
    Messages:
    337
    Likes Received:
    820
    Technically any frame will eventually wear out. It's really pros and cons on frame material. An upside to carbon is that if it gets scraped up or gashed in a crash, you can likely get it patched up, and it likely won't be to heavy to carry. If you bend an alloy frame, it's probably done for.

    I currently ride a modified Diamondback Overdrive Carbon (2014) and I sometimes put it through much harsher stuff than it should be subjected to for an XC mountain bike. It's holding up quite well... aside from having to replace the occasional derailleur hanger... :25:
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2019 at 10:34 PM
    GeoKrpan, M.Hatfield and Jeffa like this.
  29. Jeffa

    Jeffa Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2015
    Messages:
    197
    Likes Received:
    882
    They all wear out Haha my carbon bike is actually my oldest bike. Steel frames about 2 or 3 seasons Haha.
     
    GeoKrpan, Odie and M.Hatfield like this.
  30. Jeffa

    Jeffa Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2015
    Messages:
    197
    Likes Received:
    882
    I have had 5 BD bikes, not a single one has let me down. I'm telling ya, best deals you can get. 2 things you better know what you want and you better know how to fix it, because I get funny looks when I take them to a bike shop. I have the 6x6 full suspension and I've down hilled with it. Its calling isnt a hard core down hill bike, but it's a great all mountain bike.
    I have a separated shoulder right now also, but its almost there. I did some weights last night and it's ok. Took a year almost to heal.
    I have other bikes too. My road bike is a carbon cannondale super six. It's a good bike. I got a good deal on it.
    People always ask what bike should I get. Man, ride the old one you have in your shed untill you just have to buy a new one. Just ride what ever you got.
    So many used bikes out there. 3000 dollar 10 year old bikes that have been ridden one time.
     
    GeoKrpan and Odie like this.
  31. Jeffa

    Jeffa Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2015
    Messages:
    197
    Likes Received:
    882
    Your right about the carbon being good. They didnt have it yet when I got the aluminuim one. I problem would have got the same bike I have anyway, because when you strap bikepacking bags on they rub a lot and I'm afraid it would wear on the carbon worse then the aluminum

     
    GeoKrpan and Odie like this.
  32. Glenn Rowe

    Glenn Rowe Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2019
    Messages:
    397
    Likes Received:
    1,515
    Location:
    IN SoCal, but FROM the Deep South
    Sorry that I'm so late to the conversation.

    We have a pair of older Raleigh M60 21-speed mountain bikes with chromoly frames. (Can you say "OMG that's heavy"? I knew you could!) Working with our excellent bike shop we found some "city-slicker" tires that do the job for us. The central part of the tread is for pavement use, but there are some really nice side-lugs should we get into softer/rougher terrain. I have the bikes rigged to take rear baskets or panniers, and have contemplated adding the capability of front panniers as well. Just haven't pulled the trigger on that one.

    Anyhoo, we customarily ride 15-20 miles at a time. Our longest trip was a tad over 35. I have gone grocery-shopping, to the bank and post office, etc., on mine. I'm the decrepit one BTW; my lovely attends serious spinning classes 2-3 times per week, and can easily kick my backside on a roadtrip.
     
    GeoKrpan, Jeffa and Odie like this.
  33. squishware

    squishware Troubleshooter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2010
    Messages:
    968
    Likes Received:
    5,389
    Location:
    Carlsbad, CA
    Steel and Titanium frames can last a lifetime of use. Carbon will catastrophically fail in your lifetime of use.
     
    GeoKrpan and Odie like this.
  34. Odie

    Odie Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2017
    Messages:
    337
    Likes Received:
    820
    Yeah, the lateral stress isn't good for the carbon frames either. That's why the kid seat is on my wife's bike.

    Carbon fiber technology is getting better each passing year. There's nothing wrong with alloy or steel, nor is there anything wrong with carbon fiber. It's light, it's strong, and it will last just fine. I've crashed my bike hitting some gnarly trails and I've crashed it at the bike park jumping table tops, and the frame is holding up well. No catastrophic failures. Would I use mine for bike packing? No, there are better choices for that. But it is light, quick, stable, and handles well with the short stem and 800mm wide bars I put on it. If you don't like it, don't use it, but that doesn't make it unreliable.

    Any bike requires regular inspection and maintenance to make sure the frame, regardless of material, and the components attached to it are ride worthy.
     
    GeoKrpan, Jeffa and CamoDeafie82 like this.
  35. CamoDeafie82

    CamoDeafie82 Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2014
    Messages:
    1,533
    Likes Received:
    955
    Location:
    Oregon
    Long ago on the internet, someone blogged about using road bikes on mountain bike singletracks...

    I cannot seem to find that blog anymore... but the gist was that skinny tires were fine on the singletracks used... although it must be noted that the majority of the trails shown were well used, relatively hard packed dirt trails with some boulder surfaces and lots of tree roots as opposed to loose gravel and muddy conditions.
     
    GeoKrpan and Odie like this.
  36. Odie

    Odie Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2017
    Messages:
    337
    Likes Received:
    820
    You might be thinking of cyclocross.
    https://gearpatrol.com/2018/10/11/complete-guide-to-cyclocross/
     
    GeoKrpan and CamoDeafie82 like this.
  37. CamoDeafie82

    CamoDeafie82 Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2014
    Messages:
    1,533
    Likes Received:
    955
    Location:
    Oregon
    GeoKrpan, Odie and Jeffa like this.
  38. Jeffa

    Jeffa Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2015
    Messages:
    197
    Likes Received:
    882
    All ya need is a nice lite hardtail mountain bike. If you cant keep up with the road bike people, well you said your in mountain bike mecca so ya still wont ride alone
     
    GeoKrpan and Odie like this.
  39. CamoDeafie82

    CamoDeafie82 Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2014
    Messages:
    1,533
    Likes Received:
    955
    Location:
    Oregon
    Perhaps he could do well to have a set of skinny knobbies on his road bike, depending on clearances and wheel type?

    Edit; basically a cyclocross setup so he can go on some simple mtn trails (hardpacks, singletrack, fire roads, etc)? Nothing overly fancy/crazy that would require full suspension, or even front suspension
     
    GeoKrpan, Jeffa and Odie like this.
  40. Odie

    Odie Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2017
    Messages:
    337
    Likes Received:
    820
    At this point, I'd never trade my front suspension. But my mountain biking goals are different from most other people's. I have more interest in competition and not so much in bike packing. The next bike will have full, but I'm considering going with an MRP coil fork instead of air... Coil forks have much longer maintenance intervals compared to air and the MRP coil forks are only slightly heavier than their air forks.
     
    GeoKrpan, Jeffa and CamoDeafie82 like this.
  41. Morrow7x

    Morrow7x Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2018
    Messages:
    636
    Likes Received:
    2,775
    We do have the 'Bicycle Riders' forum...;)

    Just sayin', haven't seen a thread get hijacked into so many different sub-topics unrelated to the OP in quite some time... :D

    Nice to see so much interest in bicycles at least...:dblthumb:
     
    GeoKrpan and Odie like this.
  42. bikerector

    bikerector Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2019
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    67
    Location:
    SE Michigan
    How rough is "a taste" of mountain biking? I think you're looking for something rigid, but if the riding is reasonably tame, some of the more aggressive cyclocross/monstercross bikes can work really well for that. I can tear up fairly mild crosscountry level trails with 40mm tire on my single speed pretty well. It's the bike in my profile pic. Converted a 27.5" hardtail frame to a drop bar CX bike. My PR at one of my local trails is on this one, back when I was still in good shape. I think something like a jamis renegade would do it, as an example. I wouldn't ride with panniers on the trail with one though, if that's something you're thinking (I don't think it is).

    Otherwise, I would go with a basic mountain bike, and try to ditch the front suspension if possible. I'm of the opinion that no suspension is better than low-end suspension, which tends to come on a lot of entry level mountain bikes.

    Used is always the best way to get a value, IMO, especially if you know how to work on your own stuff and know what to look for on a used bike for damage and wear. Surly has a few bikes at the top end of your price range. If you can find one used, you may be golden. I'm not sure how often they have closeout deals on these as they used to sell out pretty quick each year.

    I use a vassago fisitcuff for this type of use, that I build from the frame up and a bunch of spare and used parts. If you have stuff lying around and can find a cheap frame and wheels, you can usually get a pretty decent rig put together with some shopping around of used or new take-off parts from people upgrading their stock rigs.

    Edit for pics:
    This is my "rough use everywhere" bike.
    [​IMG]

    Fat bikes can be had reasonably cheap in the off-season but it seems like everything accessory-wise is still pretty pricey for them. Not real fast on the pavement, but not as slow as you may think just by looking at them. I wouldn't want to do a paved century on one but they're a little more pleasing on gravel roads and two-tracks, especially if you get into a sandy or chatter bump area.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2019 at 8:50 PM
    GeoKrpan, Odie and CamoDeafie82 like this.
  43. Odie

    Odie Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2017
    Messages:
    337
    Likes Received:
    820
    I usually don't get around to putting pics up, but here's my ride. (Don't mind the 27.5 e-bike behind it. That is for my wife.) IMG_20190712_213934.jpg
    2014 Diamondback Overdrive Carbon (29er)
    Mods:
    - Converted from a 3x10 to a 1x10 with a 32t chainring narrow-wide oval from Fifty-fifty
    - Spike 800mm wide, 30mm rise handlebars (stock was 670mm/15mm)
    - Spike 35mm stem (stock was 90mm)
    - Hope handlebar end plugs
    - Brand-X 125mm external routed dropper seatpost (makes a huge difference in comfort and confidence when hauling down a trail at high speed)
    - OneUp Components composite pedals (amazing grip)
    - Stock wheels have Maxxis Minion DHF (2.3) on front and DHR II (2.3) on rear set up tubeless with Huck Norris inserts (amazing grip at lower pressures; fantastic off-road)
    - Second wheelset are DT Swiss wheels with Schwalb Racing Ron's with tubes (I use these for riding pavement)
    - Mucky Nutz reflective mud guard on front fork
    - Hockey tape on brake lever and dropper seatpost lever

    I picked up the second wheelset/tires/tubes on Craigslist new for $125. Needed to get a second cogset for the rear wheel and tools to mount it to the wheel. If you add up cost of tools, greases/lubes, pastes, and parts I'm close to $900 or so deep in modifications and self-maintenance. All worth it. It's a far more fun and capable bike than stock.

    I'll never get rid of it, even after I get to build my full suspension dream bike, because everyone should own a hardtail.
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2019 at 10:41 PM
    GeoKrpan likes this.
  44. Odie

    Odie Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2017
    Messages:
    337
    Likes Received:
    820
    OP went to go look at bikes. We've been biding our time until he reports back. I hope he finds something suitable for what he wants to do.
     
    GeoKrpan likes this.
  45. Big ian

    Big ian Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2017
    Messages:
    504
    Likes Received:
    2,176
    Location:
    BC Coast Mountains
    From one MTB destination to another....

    Craigslist is your friend. Quality used mountain bikes are cheap, you can get way more for your money used over new. Fit and geometry are super important to your enjoyment. Things like stem and bars can be swapped out to improve cockpit comfort.
    https://boise.craigslist.org/search/bia?min_price=400&max_price=1100

    If it were me, the most versatile bike you can get is an aluminum hardtail with a decent (brand name) shock and disc brakes (mechanical or hydraulic). Easy enough to ride to the store, sturdy enough for most trails. Yes, a slack DH rig is better for downhilling, yes a full-suspension trail bike is more comfortable on bumpy stuff. Yes, more things to break on these and yes, the lighter the components, the more fragile and expensive to replace. Yes, skinny tires and drop bars are faster.

    I've blasted all over the West coast on a hardtail (BC, Utah, Arizona, California, Oregon), it made me a better rider in the end for certain. For fun (and perspective), here's a quick vid of the trail I rode today before work (vid is not me):
    https://www.pinkbike.com/video/474930/ (good stuff starts at :35)
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2019 at 11:29 PM
    GeoKrpan, CamoDeafie82 and Odie like this.
  46. GeoKrpan

    GeoKrpan Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2011
    Messages:
    3,695
    Likes Received:
    2,582
    Location:
    Westlake Village, SoCaL
    I have never taken a Motobecane to a local bike shop.

    I've got a separated shoulder too, for two months.

    My twin brother just bought a 6 or 7 year old Colnago C50 for $2000, barely ridden. I don't think my brother would ever buy a Motobecane, he just doesn't get it. Thinks he's getting something with name brands that you don't get with BD. I can't for the life of me figure out what that is. He has been effectively propagandized by the hype.
    Dave Brinton, former Olympic team, currently cycling trainer consigns his clients old bikes, makes bank.
     
    Jeffa and Odie like this.
  47. GeoKrpan

    GeoKrpan Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2011
    Messages:
    3,695
    Likes Received:
    2,582
    Location:
    Westlake Village, SoCaL
    I've broken several steel frames but never an alu or carbon frame.
     
    Jeffa and Odie like this.
  48. GeoKrpan

    GeoKrpan Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2011
    Messages:
    3,695
    Likes Received:
    2,582
    Location:
    Westlake Village, SoCaL
    Unless it's uber cheap, I'd probably steer away from carbon for the dirt. I'd get a cheaper metallic bike, won't feel so bad about trashing it.
     
    Jeffa and Odie like this.
  49. GeoKrpan

    GeoKrpan Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2011
    Messages:
    3,695
    Likes Received:
    2,582
    Location:
    Westlake Village, SoCaL
    Find some vids of Danny MacAsgill riding road bikes on the trail, mind blowing.
     
    Jeffa and Odie like this.
  50. GeoKrpan

    GeoKrpan Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2011
    Messages:
    3,695
    Likes Received:
    2,582
    Location:
    Westlake Village, SoCaL
    That's my gripe about suspension, the maintenance.
     
    Odie likes this.

Share This Page