Another Deer Shoulder Preparation

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Gathering' started by stillman, Sep 13, 2019 at 6:13 PM.

  1. stillman

    stillman Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2009
    Messages:
    3,653
    Likes Received:
    5,300
    Location:
    Notlanta
    If anyone has read my posts about cooking deer, they know that I'd rather cook a front shoulder than a backstrap. When butchering, I keep the front leg whole and look for ways I can cook the entire limb in one piece.

    Yeah, tenderloins are tender but they don't do any work so they don't earn much flavor. That front leg, it works hard and has earned it's taste.

    Here are the things you'll need:
    The front leg of a deer (minus the hoof.)
    Tablespoon of salt
    Teaspoon each of red pepper, and black pepper.

    Stock. Deer would be best but whatever you have will work. As you'll see, I've also made this with the drippings from a pork shoulder that was cooked overnight in a smoker.

    Turkey roaster or other large, covered pan.


    Here's how I came up with this recipe:

    Recently, I grilled some suya over a wood fire. I hated to burn up a whole grill full of pecan limbs for one quick cook so I prepared a deer shoulder for an idea that was kicking around in my head. The prep was pretty fast - most of the easy to filet silver skin was removed and the meat was dry-rubbed with a mixture of salt, black pepper, and red pepper. That's it. I didn't try to remove all of the silver skin, as it plays an important role later in the process.

    When the suya came off the grill the whole leg went on in its place. I know what you're thinking "that is going to be an indigestible mess!" but hang with me, we're getting to the good part. After 10 minutes or so (about how long a big platter of suya lasts around here) I filpped the leg to cook the other side. The time will vary based on how hot the grill is. I wasn't really trying to cook it just flavor it with smoke and dry heat. It stayed over the coals until the outside of the meat looked shiny and kind of leathery, but not burned.

    When the grilling was finished, I took the leg to the kitchen and cut the joints so it would fold up and fit into a turkey roasting pan. Cutting the joints is pretty easy but takes a little bit of patience at times. You just start cutting around the joint until it opens up enough for the knife to get in there and cut the interior connective tissues.

    One important consideration is the size of the roaster. I learned from a previous bad experience that the meat needs to be at least 75% submerged. If your roaster is too big you'll need gallons (maybe) of liquid to do the work. A 16" turkey roasting pan is just about perfect.

    So I threw the leg into the roaster and filled the space with stock for braising. I had been smoking a pork shoulder earlier in the day so I took the drippings from that and added it to my stock. You can add just about anything that's good with deer at this point: sauteed onions and garlic, etc.

    I set the oven to 300 degrees and let it cook overnight. You really can't cook it too long with this method, as long as you add liquid if too much of it evaporates. 300 degrees seems to be about the right temp to melt all of the connective tissue into something that seems like fat but is actually good for you.

    I got up once during the night to check on it and had to resist the urge to start eating. The next morning I used a fork and some tongs to pull the meat from the bones and to shred it like pulled pork. The cooking liquid was strained and reduced in a saucepan.

    We made BBQ sandwiches and tacos with it. This would also be good in tamales or any other meal where tender, smoky meat would be welcome.

    The leftovers were portioned into vac bags with a few spoons of the reduced stock, then frozen.
     
  2. halo2

    halo2 Curmudgeon in Training Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2010
    Messages:
    1,668
    Likes Received:
    4,412
    Sounds pretty tasty to me. Thanks for sharing that.
     
    Winterhorse and stillman like this.
  3. mcblade

    mcblade Hobbyist Hobbyist Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2013
    Messages:
    536
    Likes Received:
    1,845
    Location:
    Orange Park Fl
    I did a shoulder like this once
    1 x cut the top, put black pepper corns in the joints.
    2 if using a smoker put white wine as the liquid then an apple and an orange in it
    3 lay about 8 strips od bacon on top
    4 smoke over preferred wood I used mesquite
    I gotta tell you my wife is mean she made me eat that whole thing by myself OH the suffering I went through.
     
    Winterhorse and stillman like this.
  4. Winterhorse

    Winterhorse Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2013
    Messages:
    13,157
    Likes Received:
    54,965
    Location:
    Kansas
    Delicious sounding meat. Just the description has my mouth watering.
     
    stillman likes this.

Share This Page