Archaeo Broken Bowl

Discussion in 'Primitive Tools' started by Ivan, Mar 5, 2018.

  1. Ivan

    Ivan Scout

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    bowl rim Abalone Cove 3.4.18a.JPG bowl rim Abalone Cove 3.4.18b.JPG

    I found this bowl rim fragment over the weekend at an archaeological site. I don’t know what kind of stone it is. It looks like clay, which is odd because the indios at the site supposedly did not do ceramics. I'll show it to experts.
     
  2. NWPrimate

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    Cool! I will be very interested to hear what you learn from them.
     
  3. thereandbackagain

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    When you take an artifact from a known archaeological site it is a violation of the Antiquities act. Every piece is part of a puzzle no less potentially critical than a spent shell casing at a crime scene. Once removed from 'in situ' the most humble projectile point or spectacular piece's potential information, indeed it's very validity is lost. This isn't personal. I am a Archaeologist, member of SOPA ( Society of Professional Archaeologists)
     
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  4. Ivan

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    What do you suggest I do with the piece?
     
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  5. thereandbackagain

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    Might as well keep it. Everyone has dreamed off, and sometimes do stumble on an arrowhead as a kid and brought it home. The problem is there are a finite number of sites and many have been degraded by pot hunters, developers and outright vandalism.
    People will argue ' well if I left it there odds are it would never be seen again.' I counter argue it has lain there all this time untouched. I would suggest taking some classes, learn about your local area prehistory and history and volunteer on a few excavations. It's science, but not rocket science to properly study a site and learn basic skills. You get to know your area and it's never the same. You start seeing it in times past, learn about foods we call inconvenience ( acorns are the singular most nutritious food on earth and people sweep them away) and start seeing Imperial Elephants striding down the fast lane of the freeway at rush hour. Then somebody cuts you off and you imagine having an ATL ATL for a driveby.
     
  6. Ivan

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    P1060640 cropped.jpg P1060643 cropped.jpg

    I do try to do the right thing. I found it lying right on a trail through a city park. Though unseen by virtually all visitors, fragments of such culture material litter the ground. The area is regularly plowed to control weeds and grinds the stuff to bits. I try to save anything of value I come across. Attached are letters I’ve gotten for two other donations to local museums.
     
  7. LazyPK

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    Very neat.
     
  8. thereandbackagain

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    I worked on that site complex. Your artifact doesn't have to be pre Columbian. We had a Californio period with imported and local pottery works and adobe construction and a substantial and ongoing 'anglo' period- a term I despise. All this stuff can be comingled in time with Ground Squirrel and human activity.
     
  9. renter6

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    Nice letters Ivan, those are keepers; thereandbackagain, nice to meet another archaeologist on these forums!
     
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  10. Medicine maker

    Medicine maker Guide

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    This inspires me to make a bowl. Ive always thought something would taste better in a real self made clay bowl.
     
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  11. Ivan

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    I can only guess what this bowl was used for, but I like to think it may have served as a medicine bowl as others uncovered not far away were. Found at Malaga Cove were bowls used in the Toloache Ceremony.
     
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  12. Medicine maker

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    I wonder how they must have carried bowls like this. Id imagine it was rather heavy.
     
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  13. Ivan

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    Over the weekend I found many more pieces of broken artifacts. One vesicular basalt piece is from a very large bowl. I believe these were used both as mortars and cooking pots. Such large pots, not transportable, indicate fair sized communities; village sites.
     
  14. Bitterroot Native

    Bitterroot Native Indigenous Skills Junkie

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    My thoughts exactly! Large pots like that are a sure sign of permanent or semi permanent habitation. Great post, I LOVE archaeology especially pre columbian stuff :22:
     
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  15. Sinjin

    Sinjin Firebrand Bushclass I

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    @Ivan Although what @thereandbackagain is saying is indisputably true, the fact that the trail this piece was found on is plowed by machinery destroys the context of the site. With that said, I believe that finding a piece laying above the soil is better donated to an establishment than left to degrade on the surface. Awesome find! Also, to find out if it is ceramic or not, rub the edges where it fractured. If it feels chalky, or like particulate is sort of crumbling off then it more than likely is ceramic.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2018
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  16. Medicine maker

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    Interesting. Perhaps some of the old 17-18th cen maps may give some type of idea what was in the area.
     
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  17. Ivan

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    Thanks. I think now it is the same basalt found on the shoreline at the site; only a bit different in graininess and color.

    I’ve been working with a group of people on a project mapping out old village sites for a future exhibit at the Point Vicente Interpretive Center. We found a large artifact at one site which we believe identifies the place as the lost village of Toveemonga. I have an article pending publication on the matter.
    Discovery Room case.jpg
    This photo shows a museum case I set up of stuff the city had in storage. These stone bowls are of basalt, the same as my finds. I found the bottom center bowl in two pieces from two separate collections and put them together again.
     
  18. Riverpirate

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    As a south Georgia land owner, the last thing I want is for my land to be condemned as an archaeological dig. I keep every piece I find for my collection. Most people i know in Georgia who own land feels this way.
     
  19. renter6

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    Hey Riverpirate, I totally understand this sentiment and I've gotta say I've never really heard of this happening in the United States. Maybe in other nations but in the US, property rights mean the archaeology that is present on your land is simply more of your property, no matter how important it is. Archaeologists may seek your permission to dig on your land, or ask you for a deed of gift transferring artifacts to their university/museum/foundation, but its your property until that happens. I've happily worked on private property with permission, and then returned the resulting collections to landowners, even seen them pick and choose and take out just the bits that appealed to them. All that's legit. Depending on your local laws things can get complicated if you want to subdivide or develop a piece of property, but that's as bad as it gets (so "YMMV"?).

    Just my 2c, I can't keep my mouth shut about archaeology!
     
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  20. Medicine maker

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    WOW youve gotta share that when it comes out.
     
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