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Autumn Foraging... Post it up!!!

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Gathering' started by GreenFrog, Sep 26, 2016.

  1. GreenFrog

    GreenFrog Hardwoodsman #8 Supporter Bushclass III

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  2. Doubles

    Doubles BCUSA Friend Bushcraft Friend

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    You start a thread with a new season, and have nothing to post?
     
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  3. GreenFrog

    GreenFrog Hardwoodsman #8 Supporter Bushclass III

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    Hah, just added something and see your post. I wouldn't dare.
     
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  4. Brew-Jitsu

    Brew-Jitsu Supporter Supporter

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    Is it foraging if it comes from the yard? Looking for a few hours to harvest these crabapples to make some jam and hot pepper relish.

    [​IMG]
     
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  5. Doubles

    Doubles BCUSA Friend Bushcraft Friend

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    ^^^ I vote yes to that---crabapple and hot pepper relish sounds intriguing
     
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  6. GreenFrog

    GreenFrog Hardwoodsman #8 Supporter Bushclass III

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    20160928_125001.jpg
    Lots of just past prime chicken of the woods..was hoping for hen.

    20160927_125106.jpg
    These were perfect tho

    20160927_132627.jpg

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    Soft like mango.
     
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  7. Wilderness Spirit

    Wilderness Spirit Scout Vendor Supporter

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    Found these on Saturday. I was a little late though. 20160924_125520.jpg
     
  8. 2btroutdoors

    2btroutdoors Tracker

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    20160925_153201.jpg

    The area where I found this puffball smelled of cheese and when I cut into I saw some yellow changes near it's base, so I didn't take it home.

    20160925_150746.jpg

    I haven't eating coral mushrooms, but found a few on my hike. Also some volunteer apples in the woods.
     
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  9. Mjolnir

    Mjolnir Scout

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    Gathered these a few minutes ago: Hicans, persimmons and hackberries IMG_20160929_102528.jpg
     
  10. riverjoe

    riverjoe Supporter Supporter

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    Sent the ninja out over the cliff at the bloodroot for wild cucumbers . Found there not even edible . Seeds apparently are hallucinatory so maybe that could be handy . One source says young vines and tendrils Are good stir fried [​IMG][/URL]
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2016
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  11. .356luger

    .356luger Scout

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    We may be on the same quest for corals currently. I found several of the same ,maybe, you found that match the stricta deviation. I'm in Indiana and judging by your back drop on that mushroom you too are In the mid west (perhaps a Penn fan?). Incidentally I started a thread that should be deleted and placed here. Blame the warm morning for my miscue.
     
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  12. riverjoe

    riverjoe Supporter Supporter

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    I've eaten Clavicorona a couple times and found it tasty .
    Must be sure it has the little crown on top like the queen on a chess set .
     
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  13. GreenFrog

    GreenFrog Hardwoodsman #8 Supporter Bushclass III

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  14. riverjoe

    riverjoe Supporter Supporter

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    Chicken fried squirrel steak ?

    At our outing a couple weeks ago we ended up frying chicken of the woods in a little olive oil with garlic and then grilling them over the campfire .
    No swuirrel this year since my small forager buddy has a little trouble maintaining noise discipline on the hike to camp

    [​IMG][/URL]
     
  15. GreenFrog

    GreenFrog Hardwoodsman #8 Supporter Bushclass III

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    20161008_105213.jpg took a long walk looking for hen of the woods. Just found this one past prime.
     
  16. Doubles

    Doubles BCUSA Friend Bushcraft Friend

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    I don't know 'shrooms very well at all....judging by that pic, I think I PA070027.JPG may have found a hen of the woods the other day?
     
  17. GreenFrog

    GreenFrog Hardwoodsman #8 Supporter Bushclass III

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    Not sure this counts as foraging but I did just pick it up.

    20161009_154542.jpg
    Looks like it was grabbed by a hawk or owl and dropped. It was still alive and suffering when I found it..nature sure is red in tooth n claw.
    I moved it about 20 yards so I could see it from my tree stand should a bird or fox come for it but nothing did.

    The weather was 50F with heavy winds..when i got down at dark I took the hind legs for the freezer and left the rest in the forest.
    20161009_192858.jpg
    Interesting pierce marks..
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2016
  18. melbolt65

    melbolt65 Guide Bushclass I

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    Recently attended a foraging seminar on acorn and decided to gather some afterward to try to make acorn brownies or something of the sort.

    Dehydrating them at the moment.

    Chestnut oak acorns.
    [​IMG]
     
  19. GreenFrog

    GreenFrog Hardwoodsman #8 Supporter Bushclass III

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    Shared tenkara with a friend before making lunch. He runs a wild plant nursey so its interesting to walk in the forest with him and see what im missing.

    Used some previosuly gathered and on the spot ingredients to make up a meal.

    IMG_20161010_203855.jpg
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    Venison, wild mushrooms (hen, black trumpet, chanterelle, wine cap, oyster), wild greens (chive, wood nettle, watercress), sweet birch tea, spiced with wild bergamot leaves and sumac seed.
     
  20. 49North

    49North Tracker

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    IMG_2690.JPG Well not a big haul yesterday, but will get a couple meals out of it.
     
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  21. Forestree

    Forestree Supporter Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    Was excited to find and eat my first chinquapin nuts today :) I only know of one fruiting tree in the areas I frequent and in the past years haven’t been able to find any nuts. Well I was blessed today and finally found what I’ve been missing out on. Looks almost just like acorns, but oh man so sweet and tasty. Was able to gather a pint cup full and plan to start some trees in buckets and also try and roast some to see how that tastes.

    032.JPG







    048.JPG



    Figured I’d throw in some pictures of some yard foraging as well since it’s stuff in season. Pecans and pears to round out the day

    041 (2).JPG
     
  22. Mjolnir

    Mjolnir Scout

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    I only recently became interested in trying to harvest acorns because, frankly, our shagbark hickories, pecans, hicans and black walnuts are so much easier to gather. I decided though that if I were going to call myself a 'forager' I shouldn't ignore such a valuable resource. Last week I gathered a fair amount of Chinkapin Oak (Quercus muehlenbergii) and am drying them to roast later. I did a raw taste test on one and while bitter I could easily eat a few of them sliced in a salad. Today I found a couple of Swamp Chestnut Oaks (Quercus michauxii) but only ONE acorn. I'm very tempted to eat it but I'm going to resist the urge to eat it and plant it. IMG_20161017_123006.png IMG_20161017_122420.png IMG_20161003_143426.png
     
  23. Wilderness Spirit

    Wilderness Spirit Scout Vendor Supporter

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    Chaga from a recent trip to New Hampshire. 20161006_145350.jpg
     
  24. cstrickland

    cstrickland Scout

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    I am not a big forager. I have never hunted for mushrooms or even most wild plants, but DAMN if that dish right there doesn't make me want to go right now. I think that is one of the best looking ( probably the best ) forage meal I have seen
     
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  25. Mjolnir

    Mjolnir Scout

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    I gave the acorns I referenced at post #22 a couple of days in the sun to dry then peeled them today along with a few pecans I picked up this morning. I plan to roast and eat them tomorrow. IMG_20161023_143230.jpg IMG_20161023_133457.jpg IMG_20161023_125551.jpg
     
  26. Leshy

    Leshy Scout

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    Sweet chestnuts... Chinquapin ???!!!
    That looks like sweet chestnuts from over here...

    I picked just over 2 kilos with the kids today...

    A small cut to the skin to stop them exploding , then onto the coals in the pit (or just an oven, though not as nice) and 1/2 hour later it's heaven in a nutshell.

    I like them just roasted , but you can eat them raw or boiled too.
    You can make flour out of it , so bannock , biscuits , cake and you can even coat them in goey chocolate for the over indulgent ...

    Here's today's haul for me
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Gotta love Autumn
    [emoji106]
     
  27. Forestree

    Forestree Supporter Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    Very nice! Yes they are very similar and the same genus Castanea. I roasted some in the oven and it gave them a little different flavor and were very good when warm. Seemed to be a bit chewy after cooling and I've just stuck with eating them raw. Might try to roast some over the campfire though....that'd be cool. They are very sweet and by far the best nut I've ever tasted....too bad there aren't many around.
     
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  28. Leshy

    Leshy Scout

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    ...damn squirrels...
    [emoji379][emoji41][emoji486]

    Over the coals is best... for taste and texture, and skin peels easier
     
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  29. melbolt65

    melbolt65 Guide Bushclass I

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    Following up on my last post.

    Dehydrated the acorns, makes them easier to shell.
    [​IMG]

    Deshelled acorns:
    [​IMG]

    Grinding them:
    [​IMG]

    Ready for leaching the tannins out:
    [​IMG]

    Changed water a lot over the next few days:
    [​IMG]

    Dehydrating the flour:
    [​IMG]

    Ready for storage:
    [​IMG]
     
  30. Mjolnir

    Mjolnir Scout

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    I roasted and ate some of the chinkapin acorns I posted of above. The flavor wasn't bad but I made the mistake of adding a few pecans from the day's harvest and they of course blew the acorns away in flavor. ;-) These acorns were not leeched and were quite palatable. After several nuts I did detect a very slight bitterness. I wouldn't hesitate to make in-frequent meals of these acorns without leeching in a survival situation but if they were the cornerstone of my 'preps' food wise, IMG_20161024_101835.jpg I would go ahead and leech them for long term use.
     
  31. melbolt65

    melbolt65 Guide Bushclass I

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    In the foraging seminar on acorns I attended the instructor said that the tannin levels can vary greatly depending on oak type (600 species). Some have tannin levels so low that they can be eaten without issue without leeching. Others are a lot higher and more bitter, eating a little bit of any should be fine but mass quantities could cause some sort of tannin poisoning in the higher tannin acorns if great enough quantities are consumed. But lots of food has tannins, just sone more than others. Tannin poisoning - RightDiagnosis.com

    The ones I picked only had a little bitterness to them but I have eaten some before when I was that were really bitter.

    Many native Americans did it because it was 50 percent of their diets, which would be a lot of tannins to consume. They would just make a basket and set it in running water for awhile. Others used clay to leech out the tannins.

    Then again, if you were in a survival situation and there was some water nearby. You could throw some in a sock and let it sit in the water for a short bit.

    Definitely not something to be scared of though, I think you'd have to put yourself through a lot of nastiness to eat a lot to where it made you sick probably.
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2016
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  32. melbolt65

    melbolt65 Guide Bushclass I

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    Following up on this harvest, here is a batch of acorn cookies my sister baked for me using the acorn flour I made earlier in the year.
    [​IMG]

    These tasted fantastic. Very filling compared to regular cookies with all the protein.
     
  33. SmilinJoe

    SmilinJoe Supporter Supporter

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    Interesting thread guys. Plant ID is something I need to work on.
     
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  34. Zebra Alpha

    Zebra Alpha Deceased Supporter

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    Don't know how I missed this thread...

    I recently bought a book on wild edibles, and DO need to spend time finding what's out there in my neck 'o the woods (Front Range of Colorado.)
     
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  35. PhuzzyJay

    PhuzzyJay Tracker

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    Just found this thread. Awesome. I'm going to watch/ post up some relevant pics as soon as I can. The same with the two links above.
     
  36. geojag

    geojag Scout

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    My 2 yo daughter is always trying to eat acorns. I have been working with her on sitting by the fire (hot chocolate does the trick). I will have to roast some acorns for her.

    Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk
     
  37. 80mtn

    80mtn Banned Member Banned

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    20160816_175955.jpg 20160816_233008.jpg
    It's kind of dry here in New Mexico, but in the fall there are a few places where moisture gets caught coming through the mountains. This was a banner year for mushrooms. My friend and I found like, a dozen puffballs that were almost the size of soccer balls!
    We went and sold them to a foo-foo restaurant here in town for $20.00 each. We have orange club corals. I think they taste like butterscotch candy right out of the ground. Oyster mushrooms are my favorite. Broken dead cottonwoods grow a bunch. I had like 40 lbs and I was mass producing them with the dehydrator, but I couldn't get them all in before they started to turn. Got a whole lot dried though.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2017
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  38. steel a way

    steel a way Tracker

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    [​IMG]
    Honey mushroom, Stumpies, or what they're called in your neck of the woods. The best thing I'm sharing here isn't the mushrooms. It's not the edc junior scout. It's the bark on the stump. You see how it hasn't rotted off yet but you can easily pull it away form the rest of the stump. That's the perfect age for heavy yields of this choice edible.
     
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  39. 3Rotts

    3Rotts Supporter Supporter

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    Great thread! Really like the info on acorns. I have 3 oak tree's on my property and they dropped a ton of acorns. 2 of them drop acorns the size of grapes or slightly bigger but 1 drops acorns the size of raisin's. Any idea of what type of oak they are based on that?
     
  40. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Trailing blackberry leaves add a small touch of flavor to a cup of tea, but they're pretty weak on their own. A while back I made some cordage out of the vines themselves and was struck by how strong and sweet it smelled. Since then, I've been curious about using the vines instead of the leaves for tea and gave it a shot yesterday.

    Using the vine made a huge difference and imparted a lot of flavor into the water. I'll be doing this from now on as it was strong enough to enjoy on its own without adding a tea bag.

    [​IMG]
     
  41. riverjoe

    riverjoe Supporter Supporter

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    Goals this fall .
    I want finnaly process some Acorns into meal .
    I'm going to use only Acorns from White Oak since I'm convinced Red Oak just has too much Tannin in spite of what the books say . Also I'm going to cold leach it in a small stream instead of using any heat.
    Then I'm going to make some Hickory nut milk and pieces to add to the flour to make sort of natural muffin .
    Alls I I need is time .
    Probably going to need a natural binder of some kind in place of egg whites any ideas ?
    This would be something the woodland natives could have found in such large quantities that they could have been a staple of their diet .
    I know the Cherokees for one stored huge quantities of Hickory and I've read that the children's diet was largely Hickory milk .
     
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  42. riverjoe

    riverjoe Supporter Supporter

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    Riverleo gathers a box of Shagbark Hickory nuts and introduces his buddies at Valley OF Pines camp to their edibility . All three of them had no idea what a Hickory nut was or that it was ecible .

    [​IMG]





    [​IMG]
     

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