(B) Student Practice Tree Identification

Discussion in 'BushClass USA' started by abo4ster, Apr 20, 2011.

  1. Jude Streicher

    Jude Streicher Tracker Bushclass I

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    Here's my submission to the Tree ID challenge. Starts around the 18 minute mark if you really want to skip most of the video.


    Thanks!
     
  2. chndlr04

    chndlr04 roughian #2 Supporter

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    CAM00112.jpg
    American hornbeam- hardwood
    Wood uses- carving boards, tool handles, coach wheels, piano actions
    Medical- inner bark- anstrigent, treats diarrhea. CAM00113.jpg
    Durand oak- hardwood
    Wood uses- pins in cotton gins, spools, baskets, wagon hubs, barrels.
    Medical uses- diarrhea, dysentery, cough, bleeding, fevers. Bark- mouth sores
    CAM00114.jpg
    Yellow poplar- tulip wood
    Wood uses- timber, interior finish, carriage panels, coffin boxes, wooden wares .
    Nectar from flowers for honey
    Medical uses-indigestion, dysentery, rheumatism

    Eastern red cedar
    Fence posts, interior paneling, furniture
    Medical- fruits and young branches contain aromatic oils used in medicine
    CAM00129.jpg
    Sweet gum
    Railroad ties, crates, pallets, mild season firewood
    Medical- sweet gum balls- astringent, anti-inflammatory and expectorant
    Resin-treats bedsores, topical herpes and angiana
    CAM00130.jpg
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2019
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  3. wallflash

    wallflash Supporter Supporter

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    Eastern red cedar
    Juniperus Virginiana var. virginiana
    Aromatic softwood with green scale like leaves and blue berries
    Uses: Fenceposts, furniture , medicinal uses
    1EB23C58-49E0-4549-ACA0-8C91929A21E5.jpeg
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    Honeylocust
    Gleditsia triacanthos
    Deciduous hardwood tree with alternate compound leaves, long thorns on trunk and branches
    Uses : Cabinet and specialty wood . Seed pods make naturally sweet beverage .
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    Red Mulberry
    Morus Rubra
    Deciduous softwood, simple alternate leaves , red berries .
    Uses:Ripe berries are edible . Unripe berries can be used to make an intoxicating drink or eaten to produce hallucinations. Mulberry leaves can be used as food for silkworms .


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    Blackgum
    Nyasia sylvatica
    Deciduous hardwood, simple alternate leaves , blue to purple fruit, bark on older trees broken into squarish pattern .
    Uses: . Hollowed out trunks used for beehives, flowers make excellent honey . Wood used in plywood and veneers due to its anti splitting nature .


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    Live Oak
    Quercus Virginiana
    Large tree with twisting limbs that often touch back down to the ground . Hardwood evergreen with leathery leaves in simple alternate pattern . Produces acorns .
    Uses: Limbs used for framework of wooden ships due to the toughness of the wood and the curving nature of the branches . Acorns can be used as food , and cooking oil can be extracted from acorns . Bark used in dyes .

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  4. russchristianbushcraftca

    russchristianbushcraftca Tracker

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    American Elm - Ulmus americana
    Historically the elm was used primarily in manufacturing as the wood was hard and difficult to work due to it's interlocking grain pattern. Native americans used the bark for medicinal purposes. Today the elm is a staple in landscaping due to it's hardiness in a wide variety of climates and excellent shade provision. The Elm can be easily identified by its rough bark pattern and the oval, alternating serrated leaves.

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    Box Elder - Acer Negundo

    The box Elder is a soft wood and is not a popular choice for use as lumber. It is used for simple wooden implements and makes a decent fire drill set. The Box Elder is a member of the maple family and as such it sap may be harvested for syrup although it requires considerably more sap to produce the same amount of syrup as the maple and the taste is generally considered to be inferior. The tree shown here is the male version which can be determined by the stamens hanging from the branch instead of the winged seed.
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    American Sycamore - Platanus occidentalis

    Another tree that is heavily used in landscaping, the Sycamore, like the Box elder is a member of the maple family. It is easily identifiable by the bark which peels off in large pieces as the tree grows and the maple shaped leaves. In a addition to the bark and the leaves are the distinctive seed pods which resemble spiked ping-pong balls is size and shape. Like other members of the maple family, the sycamore can be tapped for it's sap although it does not come up to the quality of the true maple tree. Sycamores can grow quite large making them a top choice for shade trees and in the fall produce brightly colored leaves thus enhancing its landscape value. Native americans are known to have used the inner bark and seed pods to treat a variety of symptoms from colds and coughs to the relief of constipation.

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    California Coast Redwood - Sequoia sempervirens

    The tallest living thing on the planet, Reaching hundreds of feet in height, the Sequoia sempervirens towers over the northern coast of California and into Oregon rarely being found further inland than 30 - 40 miles. The wood is very durable and is highly sought after for it's resistance to rot, insects and disease. It is widely used in the production of building materials, especially for outdoor uses. It is also highly sought after for furniture, siding and a wide variety of commercial applications. Redwood makes an excellent bow drill set.

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    Valley Oak - Quercus lobata

    Sometimes called the "California White Oak" the valley oak is a common tree in the Central Valley and the Sierra Foothills. Easily identifiable by it distinctive lobed leaves and twisting irregular branches, the valley oak was a significant food source for native american tribes. Due to it's erratic growth pattern, the valley oak is not a top choice for construction lumber although it is highly sought after for other commercial applications such as furniture, butcher blocks and other items that benefit from being made of hardwood. Oak is a long burning fire wood an as such is an excellent choice for use in wood stoves.

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  5. Bridgetdaddy

    Bridgetdaddy Supporter Supporter

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    Here is my tree ID
    IMG_20190516_170200533_HDR.jpg
    Pear tree
    Uses: food. Fruit wood is good for spoon/bowl carving. Good place to keep partridge around Christmas time.
    IMG_20190516_151011816.jpg
    Spruce tree.
    Uses: roots for cordage (sewing material for birch bark canoes), sap for glue/fire starter. Boughs for bedding.
    IMG_20190516_135341679.jpg
    Cedar
    Uses: bark for cordage. Wood can be split thin to use for canoe floor. Soft wood easy to carve. IMG_20190516_134924807.jpg
    White Pine.
    Uses: inner bark edible, needles make good tea. Pitch used for making glue. Dead is a source for fatwood.
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    White birch
    Uses: bark can be used to make containers, canoes, also used as a fire starter. Leaves can be made into tea. Sap is edible.
     
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  6. buckfynn

    buckfynn Old Geezer Lifetime Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    White Bark Pine, Pinus albicaulis
    Uses: Fatwood, Pitch, Excellent Firewood Fuel, Indians made tea out the needles - medicinal tonic for colds and other ailments, Indians used pitch to heal cuts and wounds
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    Ponerosa Pine, Common name Yellow Pine, Pinus ponderosa
    Uses: lumber, bark can be used for knife handles, turpentine, pitch, firewood, fatwood, Shoshone Indians consumed the membrane layer between the bark and wood, Shoshone Indians used the nuts to make Pemican
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    Lodgepole pine, Pinus contorta
    Uses: Fence posts, firewood, log houses, fatwood, lumber
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    Grand fir, Abies grandis
    Uses: pressed board, paper pulp, sap can be used as an antiseptic, sap for adhesive, lumber, some Indian tribes used it for colds and fever
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    Mountain mahogany, Cercocarpus ledifolius
    Uses: Wood makes great knife handles, Native Indians used it for bows and digging tools, bark boil as tea for colds, red dye made out of the bark
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    Russian Olive, Elaeagnus angustifolia
    Uses: treatment for rheumatoid arthritis and joint pains from the dried fruit, soil reclamation from mining, wind break, been used as a analgesic and diuretic in herbal medicine
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2019
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  7. ConnorMann

    ConnorMann Tracker Bushclass I

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    [​IMG]
    Silver Maple, Acer Saccharinum
    gray bark Canada flag leaves deciduous
    Uses
    An infusion of the bark is used in the treatment of coughs, cramps and dysentery.
    can be used as a drink
    leaves are packed around apples, root crops etc to help preserve them.
    works ok for friction fire.
    walking sticks
    Makes for good firewood. Burns hot but faster than some other hardwoods.

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    Willow, Salix
    leaves like zulu spears alternate long draping branches
    Uses
    fresh bark contains salicin, salicylic acid (closely related to aspirin)
    make a fine whistle
    makes excellent cordage

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    White Birch, Betula papyrifera
    white flaky bark
    Uses
    reasonable heat but burns quickly
    Tinder Tube
    Containers
    A drink like maple trees
    Birch leaves contain natural backwoods soap
    resin is waterproof glue
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    Red Cedar, Juniperus virginiana
    reddish rough bark Flat hand like needles

    Uses
    An infusion of the leaves has been used in the treatment of stomach pains and diarrhoea.
    pitch obtained from the trunk has been used as a chewing gum
    bark for clothes and blankets.
    used to make a bow
    Burning Cedar wood driving off mosquitoes
    not a good wood to burn in a fireplace or stove. It is pretty resinous which will end up coating your chimney

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    Blue Spruce, Picea pungens
    Silvery blue short needles stiff and sharp
    Uses

    Inner bark - dried, ground into a powder and then used as a thickener in soups
    A refreshing tea, rich in vitamin C, can be made from the young shoot tips.
    roots are good for making cordage
    boughs can be made into insulation beds
    Twigs are nice and stiff and full of resin.
    Great kindling for firestarting.
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2019
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  8. americanstrat98

    americanstrat98 Wanderer Supporter

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    Eastern Cedar: Bark is excellent tinder for fire starting, wood is excellent for making vessels to hold clothing and bedding. Dried wood can be used for friction fire.
    DSC00048.JPG



    Loblolly Pine : After death the core will become lighter' or fat wood. This is used for making Pitch which can function as a sealer or glue for canoe making. The resin of this pine tree is excellent for making Turpentine which can be used as a cleaner or industrial paint thinner. Dried wood can be used for friction fire.
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    Persimmon: The fruit is edible, one variation is Ebony which is used in the construction of musical instruments. The heart wood of this persimmon tree can be used for construction of smaller non stressed items like veneer, or in knife scales.
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    Sweet Gum: Many Medicinal uses. The resin is a good topical ointment for flesh wounds. The fruit is used for pain, excellent wood for making frames for furniture, or other intricate structures. Can also be used for friction fire, but is difficult.
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    Red Oak: The bark can be chewed for mouth sores. The inner bark is used for the treatment of diarrhea , dissentery, ect.
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    Silver Maple: The wood is good for traditional rifle and pistol stocks, or knife handles. The sap can be used for cough syrup, or for treatment of the kidneys.
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  9. Wildcat Creek

    Wildcat Creek Tracker

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    5 trees with common name, Latin name, description, and two uses. Will have to do this in 5 different sections as I am not computer saavy, and no grandkids around today to help me out.

    First section

    Common name - Cottonwood
    Latin name - Populus deltoid
    Description - Up to 120' tall, rounded triangular finely toothed leaves, brittle branches easily broken with white inner wood.
    Uses - Excellent for friction fires when dried, also easily cut for fine carving.
    Pict
    Pictures - 004.JPG 005.JPG
     
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  10. Wildcat Creek

    Wildcat Creek Tracker

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  11. Wildcat Creek

    Wildcat Creek Tracker

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    Section 3

    Common name - Yellow Tulip Popular
    Latin name - Liriopendron tulipfera
    Description - Very tall tree with smooth grey bark, named Tulip because the leaves resemble a Tulip flower. The Tennessee State tree.
    Uses - The inner bark makes excellent cordage and the dried wood works well for friction fires.
    Pictures - 011.JPG 012.JPG 013.JPG
     
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  12. Wildcat Creek

    Wildcat Creek Tracker

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    Section 4

    Common name - Hackberry
    Latin name - Celtis occidentalis
    Description - Large tall tree whose grey bark has corky warts.
    Uses - Superior bow wood, and produces a bi-annual fruit which though small is very tasty and provides the perfect balance of protein, carbohydrates, and fat. The fruit is about 1/4" in diameter and is about 90% seed, so it would take a lot to make a meal but these dried fruit were found in the Peking Man site in China which is said to date back some 700,000 years.
    Pictures - 001.JPG 002.JPG 003.JPG
     
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  13. Wildcat Creek

    Wildcat Creek Tracker

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    Section 5

    Common name - Black walnut
    Latin name - Juglans nigra
    Description - Tall and spreading with dark rough bark and opposite lanceolate leaves, bearing tennis ball sized green hulled nuts on a bi-annual basis.
    Uses - Superior gunstock wood, fine furniture, sapwood for bows, and indicative of rich soil.
    Pictures - 017.JPG 018.JPG 019.JPG
     
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  14. solitudes

    solitudes Tinder Gatherer

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    My submission for tree identification and uses. I used Peterson's Eastern Forests guide. Admittedly, I'm still not super confident in the American Beech. Hopefully someone can lead me in the right direction.

    1) Eastern Hemlock - wood can be used in bow making, boughs can be used for weatherproof cover.
    Eastern Hemlock.jpg

    2) Eastern White Pine - needles can be used to make a tea high in vitamin C, inner layer of bark can be used to make flour.
    Eastern White Pine.jpg

    3) Red Spruce - pitch can be used for sealing and weatherproofing, boughs can be used for bedding and cover.
    Red Spruce.jpg

    4) Red Oak - wood is hard, known for building and burning. Acorns provide a (bitter) food source.
    Bear Oak.jpg

    5) American Beech - wood is great for burning and turning, nuts provide food source.
    American Beech.jpg
     
  15. Outdoor Dauber

    Outdoor Dauber Roughian #3 Supporter

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    I took a hike with @lyco.woodsrunner and @Lode a few months back. Took pictures of a number of trees, but never got around to making this post until tonight.

    White Pine
    Pinus strobus
    Large softwood tree, limbs typically arranged around the trunk in layers. Needles in clusters of five, just like the word W-H-I-T-E.
    Used extensively for lumber. Also provides pine pitch, fatwood and edible pine nuts.
    IMG952019061595095837374.jpg
    IMG952019061595095936654.jpg

    Black Gum
    Nyssa sylvatica
    Medium sized hardwood with simple leaves having smooth edges and alternate arrangement. Often shiney on the top surface. Large single blue berries in the fall. Older bark has a blocky appearance.
    Used include railroad ties and firewood.
    IMG952019061595110435170.jpg
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    American Chestnut
    Castaneda dentata
    Hardwood with very long, simple, prominently toothed leaves in alternate arrangement. Nearly extirpated by the Chestnut blight, most trees exist only as stump shoots and die before reaching maturity.
    Past uses when this was one of the most prominent, and grandest, trees in the Eastern woodlands included building lumber, especially barn beams and board & batten siding. Nearly all Chestnut lumber available today is reclaimed and is used for flooring, furniture and trim. Produce a tasty edible nut that is typically roasted.
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    Tulip Poplar
    Liriodendron tulipifera
    The tallest tree in the present Eastern woodlands. A soft deciduous (hardwood) tree that typically grows very straight. Furrowed bark similar to Ash can make these trees difficult to tell apart in the absence of leaves. Bluntly 4-lobed simple leaves with a tulip shape. Alternate arrangement and smooth edges. Sometimes mistaken for maple leaves. Seeds are formed in woody cones.
    The wood is soft but fairly strong and straight grained making it suitable for building lumber, trim and snowboard "cores".

    IMG952019061595152951713.jpg

    Stock picture of leaves as they were all too high.
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    Shagbark Hickory
    Carya ovata
    Hardwood tree with pinnately compound leaves. 5-7 leaflets are typically wider than other hickories and have finely toothed edges with hairy tufts. Alternate arrangement of leaves. Wood is unusually strong and flexible. Bark typically forms loose "shaggy" strips as the tree gets older. These often provide summer roost areas for bats.
    Uses include tool and axe handles, bows, flooring and cabinetry. Produce a sweet, edible nut in a hard shell.

    IMG952019061595145827056.jpg
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  16. NT PostOak

    NT PostOak Tracker

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    Tree ID begins... 1 of 5
    Let's start with my one I took my handle from:

    Post Oak
    Quercus stellata

    Description:
    Deciduous
    Height: 20 m (66 feet)
    Lobed, alternate arranged member of the beech family


    Common uses: Fencing, flooring, lumber, furniture and fuel. Makes a great charcoal for cooking.
    Medicinal use of Post Oak: The bark is astringent, and can be used as disinfectant, emetic, or to treat fever.
    Habitat: Rocky or sandy ridges and outcrops, also in dry woodlands in a variety of soils including gravelly, sandy, poor upland soils and heavy moist loamy soils, where it reaches its greatest height.

    Edible parts of Post Oak: Seed - raw or cooked. A sweet taste. It can be dried, ground into a powder and used as a thickening in stews etc or mixed with cereals for making bread. The roasted seed is a coffee substitute.


    Food and Shelter for Wildlife
    Wild turkeys, white-tailed deer and squirrels consume the post oak’s acorns during the fall and winter as a major component of their diet. The acorns have a high fat and nutritional content for these animals, enabling them to survive the winter months and produce healthy offspring. The post oak’s tree cavities and canopy offer nesting sites and dens for a wide array of both mammals and birds. Squirrels, birds and raccoons use the post oak’s leaves to build nests as well.

    A wildlife note about post oaks... copperheads like to gather at their bases at night in the summer, looking for emerging cicada larvae. Something to think about when setting up a camp.

    IMG_6457.jpg IMG_6456.jpg
     
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