Backpacking with a thermos

Discussion in 'Backpacking' started by UAHiker, Oct 11, 2016.

  1. vdeal

    vdeal Supporter Supporter

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    Interesting. My Hydroflask was fine down around 0°F carried outside my pack.
     
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  2. UAHiker

    UAHiker Supporter Supporter

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    what was your time frame?
     
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  3. vdeal

    vdeal Supporter Supporter

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    Do you mean how long was I out? If so, it was for dayhikes, some lasting all day.
     
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  4. UAHiker

    UAHiker Supporter Supporter

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    correct i was asking about how long. i did mine on several overnights leaving outside unprotected.
     
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  5. vdeal

    vdeal Supporter Supporter

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    For overnight use I would still put the bottle in the sleeping bag with me or at least next to the bag.
     
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  6. UAHiker

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    i forgot too the one night and that's how i got just a slight layer of ice but easily broken through so on my next overnight i tried it again and got the same result with even colder temps, i thought it was impressive i didn't end up with a frozen bottle :)
     
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  7. RedTail-HWK

    RedTail-HWK Tracker

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    I started backpacking with a 64 oz stainless steel beer growler at 32 and below. Last night was the first night I camped with one, and I didn't have to drink from it, but my idea is if it does freeze, I can heat the water back up by placing the growler directly on my camp stove burner or over a fire.

    [​IMG]

    I also have a smaller stainless steel water bottle for the same purpose. No thermos as of yet.
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2017
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  8. vdeal

    vdeal Supporter Supporter

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    I hope that growler is single wall. Don't ever put a double wall vessel on a fire.
     
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  9. Dusty Tom

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    I do not bring a thermos camping but I did find a 1 liter Outdoor Research stainless steel thermos while cross country skiing in Oregon. Still had hot chocolate in it :) I refer to such finds as "mountain booty".
     
  10. RedTail-HWK

    RedTail-HWK Tracker

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    Well that's good to know. I just grabbed what was available in my house, but maybe I should remove the suggestion so no one makes my mistake. Out of curiosity, what will happen though? I googled and couldn't find anything on the internet.
     
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  11. charlesmc2

    charlesmc2 Scout

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    Good vac bottles are pretty amazing. We like iced tea and I bought my wife one of the 2 quart Thermos brand at a closeout price. Keeps ice for days. The narrower necks work best since the lids have only conventional insulation plus the conduction at the neck thru the stainless. If I'm not carrying too much it's worth carrying the vacuum bottle so I can have cool water up on the mountain side. (Goes without saying for here in central Texas! It's hot and no tall hills much less mountains.)

    If you are buying and haven't studied the issue, a quart bottle keeps temperature a lot longer than a pint bottle. That's assuming both are equal quality items. More an issue for hot than cold--no heat equivalent for ice.

    I've been interested in thermal slow cookers. Tiger brand makes 6 and 8 quart vacuum containers that are essentially insulating sleeves that fit around a conventional stockpot. Of course, the weak point is the insulation of the lid, again conventional, but it does have the advantage of much larger volume. Should make a nice ice chest for smaller volumes.
     
  12. charlesmc2

    charlesmc2 Scout

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    I forgot about the liquid nitrogen! In my former career, we used liquid nitrogen to freeze samples for testing. We bought a relatively large Dewar flask capable of storing maybe 100 liters of liquid nitrogen. No mechanical refrigerators, just a giant vacuum bottle. Liquid nitrogen is quite cold, only 70° C above absolute zero The safety guys wouldn't let us keep the stuff indoors so it set outside protected from the sun but not the Texas summer's heat. That flask would keep liquid nitrogen for weeks. Make that bear proof and take that camping or fishing!
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2017 at 9:14 PM
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