Bananas, 8 for $50, get 'em now

Discussion in 'Preparedness' started by aaronu, Feb 9, 2019.

  1. aaronu

    aaronu Armchair Bushcrafter Bushcraft Friend

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    On sale in my town (Marysville, WA). Eight bananas for $50.

    Someone else has three half gallons of milk for $50. One of the jugs has been opened, but don't let that worry you. I'm sure the seller is a very clean person.

    All this because the PNW has snow. The roads are still open. Schools were either closed or late start last week and will be the same next week. Many, but not all, businesses are closed.

    The Seattle mayor was on TV telling people to stock up, stay home, be safe, etc. I think that hurt more than helped, and created some panic. Heck, for much of the US, our snow level is hardly worth consideration. People are acting like it's never snowed here before.

    A friend works at a large grocery store. His store made it on the news because some of the aisles were completely wiped out.

    Sometimes, when I want a quick and easy fire in the fireplace, I'll toss a fire log in and build a fire lay around that. Yesterday, when the wife and I were shopping, we were debating picking up a single fire log or should we get a whole box? Some guy came wheeling up with a cart saying "hold on a minute, those are mine -- I just had to go get a cart". We'd already decided on just a couple logs but if we wanted a whole box, the guy was ready to throw down over it. FYI the shelve were getting bare and there were three boxes and 3-4 loose logs left. We took our two $3 fire logs, laughed at the guy and left. He took the rest -- about $65 worth of fire logs. Those fire logs are mighty convenient but they really don't put out much heat. I hope that guy has some warm blankets.

    All this, over a couple days of snow.

    I am not much of a prepper. Hardly worth the label, really. But my family is warm and safe at home, and will remain so if the power goes out. We're not panicking about a little bit of snow. I feel pretty good about that.

    Week before last, I spoke for an hour our so with a young woman seeking political asylum from Venezuela. Among other things her father had been murdered right in front of her. Stuff like what's happening in Venezuela every day really puts a few snow days into perspective.
     
  2. kreate

    kreate Guide

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    Nothing better than being able to kick back with the family safe and sound while the rest of the world loses their minds.
     
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  3. T. Pollock

    T. Pollock T's Custom Outdoor Gear Vendor Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    People freak out here over a dusting of snow. People be crazy!!! :dblthumb:
     
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  4. Yknpdlr

    Yknpdlr Scout

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    This is a pretty common winter Lake Effect event sight where I live between Lake Ontario and the Adirondacks of NY. I've had to shovel a similar amount off the roof twice in the same week, the week before last. Plenty of food and supplies are left on store shelves around here. How DO we ever survive?
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2019
  5. MountainBorn

    MountainBorn Browncoat Supporter Bushclass I

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    I made the mistake of going to Costco Thursday night in Woodinville to grab a generator in case we lose power for several days. It was nuts.

    We had 6.5 inches on the ground this morning and went to see a movie. The roads were fine. Dumb people still sliding into the barriers on the interstate but that is just natural selection trying to do its part.
     
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  6. woodsmanjohn

    woodsmanjohn Supporter Supporter Bushclass II

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    Yep, every time snow is mentioned here the stores are flooded they shut the roads down if an inch falls here it's almost like a minor MM scenario or something. I would hate to see what would happen if something realy bad happened. People would go nuts I'm sure.
     
  7. southron

    southron Guide

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    As a old sgt. said to me.

    Proper prior planning prevents poor performance.

    having what you need when and where you need it = priceless.
     
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  8. Toytech

    Toytech Scout

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    Good thing bananas are yukky , saved myself $50 . It has not gone above -20c and gone down to -35c here in a week and a half and we have at least another week of it , snow every few days as well, business as usual here , no idea how bad it would have to get to have people panic like that . Heck if the ice age rolled in and summer never happened in not sure a lot of people would even notice .
     
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  9. TrespassersWilliam

    TrespassersWilliam Supporter Supporter

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  10. woodsmanjohn

    woodsmanjohn Supporter Supporter Bushclass II

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    Yep, :Dthat's it.
     
  11. Toytech

    Toytech Scout

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    I believe that is a french toast emergency , bread , milk , eggs .
     
  12. central joe

    central joe All quacked up Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Wanna go halfers on them bananas young fellar? joe
     
  13. bam7765

    bam7765 Guide

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    Y'all gotta be talking about the south. That's how we roll when it snows. I needed that v-8 4x4 with all terrains to go get supplies in the snow we get every 3-5 years.
     
  14. Unistat76

    Unistat76 Nerd Supporter Bushclass I

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    The immediate benefit of being a prepper for me is not even bothering to go to the store for an emergency weather situation.

    I mean, you can count on at least 2-3 bad weather events a year here in Michigan. I think for the most part people here are reasonable about them, but if even 5% panic, it can cause a shortage.

    Last couple of weeks we had bad ice, negative teens in temps, wind chill in the -20s, then a swing back up to 50 deg with rain, and then back down to the teens that night to freeze all the water. I didn't even consider going to the store, we just hung out and got indoor projects done.
     
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  15. LostViking

    LostViking Supporter Supporter

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    ^^^This^^^

    @Yknpdlr
    I’m right there with ya!
    [​IMG]


    There is a Jeep Cherokee in there somewhere. That tiny dark spot on the steep side of the mound is the passenger side mirror,
    [​IMG]


    $50.00 Bananas and fifty bucks for a gallon and a half of opened milk is why my pantry is always full. This is the kind of thing I stock up for. Not the Martian invasion.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
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  16. pgun1267

    pgun1267 Tracker

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    Imagine how people will act if and when a real emergency affects a large area for a long period of time. It will escalate and keep getting out of control as people become more aggressive.
     
  17. Yknpdlr

    Yknpdlr Scout

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    There was an unusually strong winter storm, with even more snow than usual for the Lake Effect area east of lake Ontario back sometime in the 1970's. IIRC, the record was set (at least for any area east of the Rockies) with over 90 inches of snow falling over less than a 3 day period. The army sent helicopters from Fort Drum to land with supplies to folks who lived there. I know a few of those hardy souls (my parents both grew up there a long time before then). All I later heard from said thank you, but they had no real need for resupply and thought it was way overkill for their immediate needs.
     
  18. WY_Not

    WY_Not Supporter Supporter

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    You left out one of the P's between 'prevents' and 'poor'. :D

     
  19. vdeal

    vdeal Guide

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    I lived through the giant snow storm of 1977. Preston County, WV had more snow than Buffalo, NY. We measured it in yards (not feet). National Guard brought in with 6 wheel vehicles (Gama goats). Our power was out for 9 days. My brother and I stayed with our grandparents who had power while my parents stayed at home to tend the livestock. We had 3 or 4 days of school the entire month of January. Coal company bulldozers attempted to keep the roads open in a losing battle. I've got a book with pictures of that winter and one that I remember is a school bus going through a cut in the snow that is several feet higher than the bus. You know what - we didn't panic. Everybody went about their business as well as they could. We lived on farms and had plenty of provisions - we were prepared and I still live that way. Where I work there are a lot of out of staters and foreign nationals. If it looks like bad weather I high tail it out of here because they don't have a clue and I could be stuck here for a long time. It's all about planning and common sense.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2019
  20. hidden_lion

    hidden_lion Supporter Supporter

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    Prepping used to be the normal way of life for self sustaining free people...now people dont keep a stocked pantry and wipe out in hours a stored supplies that should be good for three days
     
  21. vdeal

    vdeal Guide

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    @hidden_lion, absolutely true. I think it has a lot to do with how you grew up and if you saw value in it. I did.
     
  22. kid_couteau

    kid_couteau Warrior Poet at Heart Supporter

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    Expecting about 14 inches snow tomorrow here in Northern Maine
    Right now we are like 50 inches over our norm.
    Way of life. Keep truck full of gas and in 4WD
    Test gennies once in a while
    Store gas
    Keep lots of whiskey on hand.
     
  23. aaronu

    aaronu Armchair Bushcrafter Bushcraft Friend

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    Yep. Grocers don't carry much stock either. Any little thing and the shelves are empty.

    When my uncle (born in 1912) passed away in early 2000's we found the back hallway was lined with shelves. He kept stocking and restocking over the years and put the new stuff in front of the old. Many of the jars, tins and cans toward the back were from the 30's and 40's. FYI I don't know why he bought all those canned goods. He never ate that stuff. Most of what he ate came from his own garden and orchard. He also collected rainwater for drinking, cooking and watering his gardens. He cooked over wood heat his entire life and never once lived anywhere with indoor plumbing.

    Growing up, my dad built an addition on the back of the house. The foundation was much lower than the main house but the roof was the same as the rest of the house. The wall that had been the main house's exterior wall was completely shelved... probably 15' high and 20' to 25' wide. That's where all my mother's canning was stored. Rows upon rows of Mason jars. That was in addition to the pantry room full of modern canned goods and kitchen appliances.

    Once each of us kids started our own households, my mother would talk to us now and then about the next "case goods sale" at a local grocery store. This was pre-Costco days BTW. She would go in with us on cans of staple food items that were on sale by the case. Usually that meant canned vegetables, fruit and other staples. She would split the cost with each kid but when we divided up the purchase whichever kid(s) would end up with a few extra. That was her way of instilling a sense of thrift and teaching us to always have something on hand.

    A few years later my wife and I had a small setback. We had just drained our savings for a large purchase and (consistent with Murphy's Law) it was immediately followed by some unexpected bills. I paid the bills with our food budget. We had some extra money but nothing we could get to easily (CD's and a money market account). So we lived off our food stockpile, supplemented with a couple dollars worth of fresh veggies. My wife hadn't grown up the same way I did and boy oh boy did she complain. But we ate pretty well.
     
  24. WY_Not

    WY_Not Supporter Supporter

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    Yep. It is amazing how much further that emergency fund will go when it doesn't have to cover the emergency AND the grocery bill.

     
  25. Unistat76

    Unistat76 Nerd Supporter Bushclass I

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    I'm in my mid forties, but I sometimes feel older. My mom was a stay at home and she canned a ton of stuff every year.

    I remember shucking corn, snapping beans, tomato massacre scenes, strawberry picking, jam making and all kinds of stuff. My wife was given half my mom's canning setup when we showed the slightest interest in it.

    I just feel like in some ways I'm a generation behind.
     
  26. LostViking

    LostViking Supporter Supporter

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    That’s the whole thing with this stuff. None of it is rocket science. Nor is it anything new.

    Not all that long ago it was just living.

    A little comon sense goes a long way.
     
  27. WY_Not

    WY_Not Supporter Supporter

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    Similar memories here. As a kid I hated being "slave" labor in the garden and when canning/freezing fruits and veggies from the garden and orchard. Grandma was not happy until she put up at LEAST 100 quarts of green beans each year. Apples that didn't get turned into sauce got put into the dehydrator. She had to large chest freezers (as in 6+ feet wide) in the basement that were always well stocked with beef and popsicles. :) The beef we raised and butchered ourselves. Grandpa was an auctioneer and worked for Hobart. He had a 12 x 12 walk in cooler in the garage for hanging the beef quarters till they could be cut and wrapped. He had Hobart commercial saw and grinder to make quick work of breaking down the quarters into manageable size pieces that could be cut and wrapped.

    As an adult, I consider myself sooo blessed to have learned all that I did by their side. While I don't can nearly as much as Grandma did, I do keep our pantry well stocked.

     
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  28. JoeJ

    JoeJ Supporter Supporter

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    Your old Sgt informed you of the 7P's - there's another adjective between prevents & poor.:dblthumb:

    Sorry didn't read past the 7p's post when I quoted and corrected - good ole Wy_not is squared away. Next time I'll read more before adding my $0.02 worth considering inflation.

    We have far more "snowflakes" in this Nation than most realize - starting with the majority of members in Congress, State & Local governments. Natural Selection has been slowed to a crawl due to all the laws & regulations on the books that are being enforced by their minions.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2019
  29. arleigh

    arleigh Guide

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    I had a friend that lived on Donner pass,
    After hearing some of his stories ,
    my 3'deep slush storms and 6'deep snow storms I went through in the mountains, was nothing.
    Places like mammoth and Donner pass get 20 and 30 feet or more during the winter . these have a level of preparedness we on the more mild areas have no idea.
    Imagine having a ladder down to the top story window of the house you're living in.
    Cutting tree tops off for fire wood,
    Not venturing off the packed snow trail and being lost in the depth.
    Believe me I know what is is to be lost in the depth of snow. 10' is unnerving .
    Preparedness in areas with the potential for snow for me was having a second set of wheels mounted with snow tires ready to swap off as needed.
    The well tank was in the house laundry room and kept from freezing .
    Kerosene lamps with reflectors are permanently mounted on the walls , and these lamps do double duty both for light and warmth.
    What's strange is that people will drive past walls of snow and not think about being stuck till it happens , worse yet ,having been stuck before and not prepared for it another time.
     
  30. Yknpdlr

    Yknpdlr Scout

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    And looking at your neighbor with visions of a fork and a knife.

    Here's a youtube video of what was like on New York's Tug Hill Plateau in the mid 1900's east of Lake Ontario where my parents grew up. I can remember growing up watching the big Oshkosh plows we had at the time "bucking the drifts", by ramming them until they stopped, then backing up a bit to get up to ramming speed again all the way down the road.



     
  31. Vanitas

    Vanitas Supporter Supporter

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    We just be special stock, special ed for putting up with all that snow lol. I lived throughout that area until I had to move to find good work.
     
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  32. Cueball77

    Cueball77 Tracker

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    You should feel Blessed Brother , most folks your age just think about how much charge they have on their phones ! :dblthumb::42::44: . Don't forget your Beans, Bullets and Band Aids .....
     
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  33. Ptpalpha

    Ptpalpha Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Right here with ya, brother.
    Michigan: I'm not saying love it or leave it, I'm just saying stay the hell off the roads if you can't handle it!!
     
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  34. aaronu

    aaronu Armchair Bushcrafter Bushcraft Friend

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    Growing up, I lived out in the country in northern California. Average rainfall in the redwood foothills is close to a hundred inches a year. I rode a bus to school and had quite a walk to the bus stop. The road halfway between my house and the school routinely flooded, and there was no other way to the school. The buses were these big, tall old diesel pushers and they could get through some fairly deep water. The bus driver said as long as the water doesn't rise to the top step of the stairs into the bus, we were good to go. Getting to the top step meant the water was about 4 feet deep. The bus would churn through the water in low gear, not stopping for anything. We would all be glued to the windows looking at the stalled cars (some with people sitting in them) around the Three Corners store because people had misjudged the water depth. This was before cell phones BTW.

    Now that area is full of SoCal and Bay Area transplants that moved out of the big cities starting in the late 70's. These transplants raised property values, changed the voting demographic and raised taxes -- but I digress. First they changed the rules so if water covered the road the school had to close (more parents drive their kids to school). Then they raised taxes to build up the old road to above flood level. The new road is nicer for sure, but it cost a LOT of money to guard against a problem that happened a few times a year. I'm not suggesting the new road was a bad idea. At least it fixed a real problem.

    That was in the late 1980's. Nowadays, only a few old-timers remember driving through the floods to get to work or school. Country folks living there knew the score and dealt with it. Nowadays people in that area cannot fathom (pun) the government subjecting them to roads that might flood. People sitting in their cars while a school bus plows through 4 feet of dirty flood water would make the national news.

    What some might call gentrification, others might consider wimpification.

    Same thing is happening in Washington. I lived on the Olympic Peninsula in the 1980's. I got stranded in Neah Bay for several months one year when a mudslide took out the one and only road out of town. Another year we got snow like just happened in the Seattle area but it stayed for most of the winter. At first, no one got anywhere. Then the 4x4's could get out. After the roads were compacted down, a few enterprising Subaru drivers were able to get around as well. I could not drive my 1970 Charger (bias-ply 295's in the back) until April that year.

    I moved back to Washington in 1994. We had a couple good snows in the 90's and a couple good wind storms in the 2000's that knocked out local infrastructure. But I don't remember anyone trying to capitalize by selling bananas or milk for $50, or being willing to throw down over a box of fire logs.

    Folks are getting spoiled. And soft. And entitled.

    /RANT
     
  35. Akela

    Akela Scout

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    Now that you know how the Seattle Metro area reacts to the inconvenience of a few inches of snow, just imagine how those same people will react to a Juan De Fuca subduction zone quake (that the State received an "F" rating for on its emergency preparedness drill).
    Such is life in "The Emerald City" in the merry old land of Oz. :D
     

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