Basic/minimalist fire kit?

Discussion in 'Fire' started by Ken Fisher, Jul 14, 2019.

  1. Ken Fisher

    Ken Fisher Tracker

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    I’ve been collecting bits of gear here and there, slowly building up my kit. I’m looking to put together a basic “starter” fire kit. What would you consider to be essential for something like this?

    I currently have a 6” x 3/8” ferry rod, a couple of bic lighters, jute, cotton balls, and steel wool.
     
  2. central joe

    central joe Wait For Me!! Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Throw in a piece of flint, a striker and some char cloth and yer good fer any occasion. joe
     
  3. woodsranger

    woodsranger Solitude Seeker

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    I'd add a small magnifying lens for solar ignition.
     
  4. jackpine

    jackpine Fire? I don't see any fire!? Supporter Bushclass I

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    SAK champ
    4”x3/8” ferro Rod
    Zombie tinder 3 in one fire steel
    Piece of flint
    Mini bic
    Tinder bag
     
  5. insector

    insector Supporter Supporter

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    and a zippo in the winter in place of the bic (perhaps). I have to warm up a bic in the winter first, but that zippo is automatic flame on............. 20190710_172022.jpg
     
  6. Bitterroot Native

    Bitterroot Native Indigenous Skills Junkie

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    A spindle and a hearth board is about as basic as it gets. Tinder can be found on site generally.

    IMG9531271.jpg

    Just noticed your location, you live right up the road from me :dblthumb:
     
  7. Seeker

    Seeker Woods Bum Supporter Bushclass I

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    I practice "fire starting", but am generally lazy, so my usual "fire kit" is just a couple reliable (at least 1/3 full, otherwise they're relegated to shop/workbench use) BIC lighters. I carry one on a lanyard, another in an ankle pocket with an Exotac matchcase, and often another in my brew kit. When out overnight, there is another in my repair kit and another in my kitchen. The mini Bic especially is so light you should carry several (3 to the ounce).

    I do have a "practice kit" that's kept in a Lucky-1-2 pouch (3 or 4 fold, depending on how fat you fill it, with a buttoned pocket on top, a bunch of little folder pockets to tuck stuff in all along the length of it, and it ties shut.)

    The main pocket holds my centerpiece, an 1800s reproduction Hudson Bay tin. It's roughly 3x5/4x6, something like that, with a fresnal lens in the top. I keep a bunch of char cloth in the bottom, then a leather flap/divider, on top of which lies my flint and steel, and then another leather flap to keep the lens from getting scratched up by the steel and any loose flints. The bottom leather flap keeps them from rubbing my char cloth into crumbs. An Altoids tin also makes a decent flint and steel holder, and you can punch a hole in the top for use in charring.

    Other pockets hold a lighter, ferro rod, some birch bark squares, fatwood sticks, a mini altoids of fatwood dust, and some jute twine soaked in paraffin. I think that completes it. This provides me with the materials I need to practice flint and steel, ferro rod, magnification, and 'lighter' fire lighting using a variety of natural and man-made materials, or to show others how to do it. I'm pretty good with any of those, the hardest being magnification if the sun isn't playing nice. I also have an entirely separate bowdrill set, which I can do with varied success. Hand drill I have yet to even get smoke (baby hands, and, if I'm honest, lack of serious, concerted effort to build them up to the task.)
     
  8. insector

    insector Supporter Supporter

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    @Bitterroot Native - Cool!.......I thought you were in Oregon and Alaska. Thanks for the heads up. That sounds wonderful.... Are you in Hamilton or somewhere along the Bitteroot river?

    Or a peanut lighter maybe. It dont dry out as quick as the zippo 20190714_185815.jpg
     
  9. Doc.

    Doc. Scout

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    “This” is what I would consider “minimalist”. I would think that any more than one way to secure fire would be “basic +”. Semantics...just a thought. Doc.
     
  10. Bitterroot Native

    Bitterroot Native Indigenous Skills Junkie

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    I was referring to the OP who is in Oregon. I was born and raised in North Idaho/Western Montana ( the Bitterroot mountains) though! I lived near Libby/Troy Montana and lived in Burke Canyon Idaho for a looong time. A quite a bit north of Hamilton if I recall correctly.
     
  11. BradGad

    BradGad Supporter Supporter

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    Everyone keeps adding things!!!

    The OP asks about a basic/minimalist fire kit.

    >I currently have a 6” x 3/8” ferry rod, a couple of bic lighters, jute, cotton balls, and steel wool.

    I would say add a match safe and kitchen matches — in lots of situations, matches are simply better, either in terms of reach or quick flame — and lose the steel wool.
     
  12. byksm

    byksm Scout

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    when im backpacking my basic kit includes the bic in my pocket for ignition, a couple esbit tabs which can light damp kindling and a victorninox bushcrafter to process wood.
    of course i carry a couple redundancies but thats essentially what you need... ignition, tinder and fuel.
     
  13. SkipJunkie

    SkipJunkie Scout

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    My (Totally new to me) minimalist kit fits in a Altoids tin . It consists of three Vaseline cotton balls in McDonald's milkshake straws , a mini Bic , a small 3" x 1/4" Ferocium rod held closed by a ranger band , also useful for fire . And a small Coughlins match safe containing 5 each UCO Storm proof and Waterproof matches and two match strikers . This is a way scaled down version of the what goes on my overnight bag . I might add has really made me rethink things . I'd be just as comfortable with this kit as the larger one in most scenarios ?
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2019
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  14. schapm

    schapm Elitist Inflated Ego LB42 Supporter

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    I handled a ferro rod blank with a chunk of fatwood. I consider that a basic kit along with a knife or scraper of some kind.
     
  15. BradGad

    BradGad Supporter Supporter

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    But in practice do you use it? Can you bring yourself to use it?
     
  16. schapm

    schapm Elitist Inflated Ego LB42 Supporter

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    I’ve practiced with it to make sure it works, if that’s what you mean. The *vast* majority of my fires are started with hand drill or flint and steel due to me having an affinity for those methods. I have a little roll top ditty bag that contains the ferro rod I mentioned, a Leatherman tool, small headlamp, some instant coffee packets, travel sharpening kit, a bit if bank line, and a few other odds and ends. It’s not a survival kit per se, but I can throw it in a haversack along with a water bottle and nesting cup and be ready for a quick outing knowing I have some preparation for my expected needs as well as protection against the unexpected.
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2019
  17. chndlr04

    chndlr04 roughian #2 Supporter

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    image.jpg
    As basic as i need it, a ferro rod on my edc. I practice weekly.
    I have a back up bic/waxed jute/ferro rod in my pack
     
  18. shoggoth80

    shoggoth80 Scout

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    I run a mix of ignition methods and tinder sources. The bulk of it packs into a rectangle tin, with a spare ferro scraper, and magnifying lens rubber banded to the outside.

    I can pack what I feel is a relatively comprehensive kit into a molle pouch.

    A bic in the pocket, or a ferro rod would be minimal. Fire is pretty important though.
     
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  19. cloud forest

    cloud forest Tracker

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    Make fire can be essential in emergency situation, you have to be able to make a fire with an arm broken for exemple.

    So to me it means rubber, rubber, rubber and storm matches, a candle and a lighter, and a survival blanket if you have to make fire in emergency a blanket will be a great option.


    [​IMG]
     
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  20. backlasher

    backlasher Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    A Bic lighter, UCO storm matches and some fatwood.
     
  21. Young Blacksmith

    Young Blacksmith Supporter Supporter

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    >I currently have a 6” x 3/8” ferry rod, a couple of bic lighters, jute, cotton balls, and steel wool.

    For me, I would remove the steel wool, the jute, cut down to one Bic, Vaseline coat the cotton balls, and add a chunk of fatwood. You did say basic/minimalist. If you feel you really need a longer flame time than VCB's provide, possibly an esbit cube, Colghans cube, etc.
     
  22. OiMcCoy

    OiMcCoy Scout

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    A couple of bics, a ferro rod and some cotton balls with petroleum jelly is a damn fine kit.

    I love bringing out lot of toys to play with, but at the heart of it, if you want to keep things simple, keep it simple. A bic will work for 98% of what you need it for. Keep an extra one in a dry bag. And when a bic is not a great choice, you have your Ferro rod.


    As much as I love seeing people's fire kits, I can't help but think about the adage of doing more with less.
     
  23. insector

    insector Supporter Supporter

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    @Bitterroot Native - oops, sorry! Libby is way north of Hamilton. At least 200 miles or so. I was off base there
     
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  24. Ken Fisher

    Ken Fisher Tracker

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    Thanks for the help and advice. Looks like I’ve already got most of what I need. I’d like to add flint and steel, some char cloth, fatwood, and some storm matches.
     
  25. halo2

    halo2 Curmudgeon in Training Supporter

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    I'm guessing this is for practice versus general field carry? If so, have you considered a bow drill or hand drill?
     
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  26. danpass

    danpass Tracker

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    UCO short match case
    Rotary fire striker
    10 of the waindwaterproof matches that come with the case
    Three striker boards. The case comes with two inside then I remove the outside one and put it inside
    Four tinderquiks
    SERE compass off CountyComm

    For those who say those UCO cases leak ..... it’s true, they do.

    The solution is to take a small knife with some belly (a little SAK Classic will do) and scrape off the plastic flashing on the ledge that mates up to the o-ring. The flashing is where the join lines are.
     

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  27. MAD Punty

    MAD Punty Supporter Supporter

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    My fire kit has grown to the point where I am going to have to buy a duffle bag for it, soon.:confused:
     
  28. TAHAWK

    TAHAWK Guide

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    Another "Seattle Special" addition: trick birthday cake candle. About $.10. Space = 2 kitchen matches. Weight negligible. Reignite when blown out. Need to submerge in water to extinguish. Never had to use the one I keep in my match safe, but comforting to have.
     
  29. HipJackRafter

    HipJackRafter Tracker

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    Is that a handcuff key??
     
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  30. Dave_Markowitz

    Dave_Markowitz Supporter Supporter

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    My $0.02:

    A "basic" fire kit is what will enable you to make a fire when you need one. To that end, I carry:

    • UCO Stormproof matches.
    • A ferro rod and scraper.
    • One or more Bic lighters. (In cold weather, keep a Bic inside your coat so it doesn't get too cold to work.)
    • Some kind of man-made tinder, whether it's cotton balls impregnated with petroleum jelly, Esbit tablets, or Trioxane bars. This is key.
    When I was in a Civil Air Patrol ground search and rescue squadron I added a 15 minute magnesium road flare in my buttpack for when we pitched camp after dark and everything was wet and/or it was raining.

    Primitive methods like a bowdrill, fire piston, or flint and steel are fun to use but if a life is on the line I'm going to use every bit of tech I can to get that fire going RFN.
     
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  31. TAHAWK

    TAHAWK Guide

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    "Primitive methods like a bowdrill, fire piston, or flint and steel are fun to use but if a life is on the line I'm going to use every bit of tech I can to get that fire going RFN."
    :dblthumb:

    No grades. Pass/fail.
     
  32. chndlr04

    chndlr04 roughian #2 Supporter

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    Yes it is
     
  33. Todd1hd

    Todd1hd Supporter Supporter

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    My "Minimalist" fire kit is a mini Bic.

    More than that and it is no longer minimalist.
     
  34. Haggis

    Haggis Bushmaster

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    Yep... Bic: flint, steel, char cloth , and accelerant. A Bic is the complete deal, and a mini Bic as compact as it comes...
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2019
  35. Bitterroot Native

    Bitterroot Native Indigenous Skills Junkie

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    Haha no worries man! Bitterroots are a big range, you were closer to base than most folks :D
     
  36. Barry J

    Barry J Guide

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    A really good addition to a "minimalist" kit would be a slow match (I think that's what it is called). This is a length of cotton cord, about 1/4 inch thick, treated with paraffin or saltpetre (potassium nitrate) and has a metal tube on one end. This makes a perfect addition to a kit relying on Bic lighters, because it produces a good sized flame and reduces the wear and tear on the lighter.
    You just push some of the cord up through the metal tube and light it. Then use this to light your tender bundle. Then pull the rope back through the tube, to snuff out the fire. They last quite a while, and will start many fires.
    Once charred, you should be able to use it with a ferro rod.
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2019
  37. bacpacjac

    bacpacjac Queen of the Cups Supporter Bushclass I

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  38. Ken Fisher

    Ken Fisher Tracker

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    Since this is all really new to me, it’s both. I’m gathering together a basic set of gear and will be taking day trips to learn and practice lots of skills, hopefully leading up to a couple of overnight trips. I really like the idea of using a bow/hand drill, but I should probably get familiar with just starting and keeping a fire going before learning to use the drill.
     
  39. bacpacjac

    bacpacjac Queen of the Cups Supporter Bushclass I

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    You've got a great attitude! There's so much to learn. Start with the basics and have fun! Have you checked out BushClass yet? If not, click here to get started.... https://bushcraftusa.com/forum/threads/read-this-before-starting.27539/
     
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  40. DavidJAFO

    DavidJAFO Keeper of the Clubhouse swear jar Supporter

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    "somewhere having a brew (tea)"
    hello,
    @MAD Punty P-L-E-A-S-E ^^^^ don't encourage them... :4: ROTFLMAO
    Regards
    David
     
  41. bacpacjac

    bacpacjac Queen of the Cups Supporter Bushclass I

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    Too late! HAHAH!!! A bunch of enablers around here, there are!
    Pyro.jpg
     
  42. woodsranger

    woodsranger Solitude Seeker

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    Actually, the Baddest Bee Fire Fuse would be absolutely perfect for that. Though you could just blow it out without using the tube. I think of them as, among other things, and extended-burn match.

    https://www.amazon.com/Epiphany-Outdoor-Gear-Baddest-Fuses/dp/B00LI24OJC/ref=sr_1_3?crid=1T086A04HC4Q0&keywords=baddest+bee+fire+fuses&qid=1563367668&s=gateway&sprefix=baddest+,aps,163&sr=8-3

    As for mini bics, I suppose they save some space since they're about 2/3rds the length of a standard bic, but for me, they're too small to be able to operate easily. And if my hands are cold I'd much rather have the extra length to be able to grip. Gross motor skills and all that.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2019
  43. DavidJAFO

    DavidJAFO Keeper of the Clubhouse swear jar Supporter

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    hello,
    :rolleyes: cousin @bacpacjac ^^^^ head in hands shaking my head side to side vigorously. :4: ROTFLMAO
    Regards
    David
     
  44. bacpacjac

    bacpacjac Queen of the Cups Supporter Bushclass I

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    :18::18::18:
     
  45. halo2

    halo2 Curmudgeon in Training Supporter

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    Seems a sound strategy to me.
     
  46. MAD Punty

    MAD Punty Supporter Supporter

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    As ridiculous as my fire kit has become, I do not have matches in it. I'm anti-matches. Not a fan.

    Lighter, ferro rod, magnifying lens, flint and steel. All in my kit, all preferred over matches.

    Then I have a bunch of stuff like charred punkwood tin, pocket bellows, flint and granite stones, stone handhold for friction fire, an aluminum cigar case, other bits and bobs. No matches. I suppose I could fill my cigar tin with matches...but I would never use them. I keep a stick of cattail in it.
     
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  47. insector

    insector Supporter Supporter

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    "Cadillac" peanut lighter next to a bic............... 20190717_114013.jpg
     
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  48. krflol

    krflol Tracker

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    I keep a fast fire trekker. It has real magnesium, not the knockoff stuff that won't light. I removed the wooden handle, drilled a hole in it, and wrapped it in gorilla tape. The striker is affixed with titan survival cord which has waxed jute in it among other things.
    20190717_152533.jpg
    I pair this with my lighter and an altoids tin full of fatwood. Lighter and fatwood see a lot more use
     
  49. Kenneth

    Kenneth Guide

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    Hey bud this might help. I learned from this years ago and the biggest thing I can say about building a fire is "PREP". Before you strike a match or flick a bic, get everything ready, as proper prep makes a big difference.
    https://bushcraftusa.com/forum/resources/freds-fire-building-tips.264/

    GOD Bless you and your family

    Kenneth
     
  50. Jean

    Jean Guide

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    The sparklite kit with the tinderquiks is a reliable, light kit.

    True emergency only kit would be the Firefly ferro rod in my SAK or knowing that a pinch of batting can be lit using the sparker of even a dry Zippo.

    I stash ignition sources in all my jackets, with various tinders/extenders if possible. Mini-bics, Doans bars, ferro rods, fire piston and sparklites are in ziplocs. I'm sure we all have a box/drawer with a bunch of fire makers - make sure you have one on you.
     
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