Basswood Cordage

Discussion in 'Other Skills' started by scottmm2012, Apr 15, 2018.

  1. scottmm2012

    scottmm2012 Supporter Supporter

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    An exercise in patience.

    Harvested basswood for another challenge. Step three in the process. Natural cordage.

    Processed basswood inner bark.
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    Natural cordage.

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  2. Youcantreadinthedark

    Youcantreadinthedark Amphibian. Supporter Bushclass I

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    I wish I had access to basswood. I want another tumpline. And yes, lots of patience required. :4:
     
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  3. scottmm2012

    scottmm2012 Supporter Supporter

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    I have to be honest. I had to google tumpline. That, my friend, is quite the endeavor. Would the strap also be basswood? How would you make the strap?
     
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  4. Youcantreadinthedark

    Youcantreadinthedark Amphibian. Supporter Bushclass I

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    I've made one from agave fibers (whump whump whump all day long), and a few from store-bought cordage, but never one from basswood. You start with your desired overall length plus maybe 15% for what you'll lose twining and braiding; say, 10 strands of 12 feet each. You twine the headband in the middle first, so you have a headband of maybe 15 inches, with loose strands on either side, and then you either weave or braid your tails out of those loose strands. (Each tail would be somewhere around five feet, in this hypothetical case.) The original number of strands affects how you can braid them; you could do a flat weave for a few feet and then switch to split tails of half the total strands each, for instance, or a single continuous tail all the way down, depending on what you wanted. You can make very nice looking ones out of store-bought hemp or similar without the cordage processing, but there's some magic in basswood.
     
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