Boatsteading?

Discussion in 'Homesteading' started by Zunga, Dec 15, 2017.

  1. Zunga

    Zunga Bushmaster

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    While defiantly not a multi generation concept and likely very regional boatsteading is a thing! (Living on a sailboat entirely. Including growing veg and chickens in some cases.) I first found a book on it 2 years ago on a sailing trip. It was written in the 70s but had some good science and experience. (sailing the farm I think) anyhow just looking for thoughts!
     
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  2. LongAgoLEO

    LongAgoLEO Guide

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    Not sailboats per se, however various marinas (where permitted) allowed year-around live-aboards on the Upper Mississippi River. Lots of fascinating stuff floating around out there; replete with fresh vegetation and winter greenhouses. My wife would not embrace the homesteading approach, but rather viewed our various boats as alternatives to making the 170-mile roundtrip commute to work from our home northwest of town - in the summers. She would never entertain winters, however I fully enjoyed my lone winter living aboard the year before we married. Our boats were 2-miles from our offices, so we often summered on the boats. The plan initially was to retire, motor south, homestead on whatever our boat was at the time - or make/build a new one. But, we both retired years ahead of schedule and all the grandkids ended up situated locally. Things change, ya' know. Plus, I tired of (big) boats; they're but poorly built houses in various stages of controlled sink.
     
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  3. Zunga

    Zunga Bushmaster

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    Here I'm blessed a lot (hundreds) ports big and small not to mention private floats and moring floats. A guy with my skills can alway find a job in those places. I guess my version is half, nomad half boatstead. Many here live on the boat year round (often a private float better deal) and hold a job or take day work. Once that boat is full of food and gas. Your gone. You'd think employers wouldn't want you back. But these jobs are often seasonal and in small places with very a tiny labor pools. The trick I guess is getting a decent boat at a good price and then making it yours.
     
  4. whtshdwwz

    whtshdwwz Scout

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    Living on a boat is tough at best....they are cramped, damp, limited with no bathroom or shower to speak and an endless maintenance nightmare...BOAT = Break Out Another Thousand....now if you have a nice inheritance or a trust fund it would be fun a year.
     
  5. arleigh

    arleigh Guide

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    Actually they are not so cramped or damp depending on the boat an the location.
    Dampness depends on the area atmosphere ,more than the water it sit's on.
    Pontoon boats can be very nice and less aggressive side to side motion a V hull gets .they make heads and showers and water purification for boats and some areas let you dump or have a portable sewage pick up .
    Some guys set up wind mills and solar panels with an extensive battery bank adding ballast , even alternative generators during special events. Most appliances can be gotten at an RV supply and most of the tech between boats and RV is shared.
    If I were in a position of having a boat to live on , I'd park it on a mooring and use a small whaler to shuttle ship to shore.
     
  6. saxonaxe

    saxonaxe Scout

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    I lived aboard my boat between the Spring of 1999 and the Autumn of 2014, although most of my views on the subject of 'Boatsteading' would be irrelevant because I was voyaging for about 8 months in every year and rarely wintering in the same country, except when I sailed home to England every couple of years.
    Finding employment was of no concern as I was able to live off my service pension if I was careful with my spending. I've never been materialistic, possessions don't mean that much to me, for instance, clothing. A common rule amongst live-a-boards/ voyagers is owning "Three of everything" so for me that was relatively easy. Three 'T' shirts, three pairs of jeans, three pairs of socks etc: The rule is...Wear one, one in the laundry and a spare stowed away. That's it, no excuses, you don't need lockers full of clothing or indeed anything else.
    I didn't have Internet, I used Internet Cafes, they're everywhere in many Ports . I bought my food in street markets when I could, not expensive shops in smart Marinas, and did my own shipboard maintenance.
    I wintered in many Mediterranean countries, usually finding a cheap harbour berth for a few months or in the case of Greece one year, laying to my anchor in a sheltered bay in the Cyclades Islands.

    But times change. Many of the places I sailed to are now practically 'out of bounds' especially to me as a lone voyager. The South Coast of Sicily, where I wintered in Licata is a dangerous area now with the flood of desperate migrants from nearby Tunisia, so now I am enjoying life ashore...:D

    This is my boat anchored at Dartmouth on the River Dart in Devonshire in South West England. I called in for a rest and to buy stores on the voyage down from my home County of Sussex.

    [​IMG]

    And a few weeks later, anchored at Portimao in Southern Portugal.

    [​IMG]

    But life aboard was not always sunshine and blue seas....Wintering back in England I awoke in my bunk one morning to see that I was being closely observed by a Fox looking down at me through the fore hatch...The scruffy wretch didn't even wipe his muddy feet when he came aboard either...:D :D

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Seacapt.

    Seacapt. Supporter Supporter

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    Jus-Musin-001s shanty boat.jpg imagespontoon camper.jpg imagesTP16TPB3poontoon camper.jpg 2ed50835d50f8c9e3bd1764c1c95ff92  pontoon boat camper.jpg One of the neatest trends I have seen here on the Maine coast in the past several years is folks buying used structurally sound 20-24 ft. pontoon party boats, stripping off all the ugly seating and just leaving the steering station console and seat then buying a used slide in PU truck camper put on the aft section under a full length metal canopy, picnic table folding chairs, gas BBQ grill on the forward area, porti pot under camper cab overhang and powering with a 20-30 HP outboard with small Honda generator/inverter combo for 120VAC and or 12VDC power. They motor
    by day in good weather/calm seas around the dozens of peninsulars between the many protected small ports/hidden coves to spend the night/day or longer at anchor without mooring fees or at other friends piers/docks. A few groups start out in June and do most the coast from Brunswick down to Jonesport by mid August. Cheap Maine ocean front property with a different view every day if wanted with no real estate taxes.
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2017
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  8. Zunga

    Zunga Bushmaster

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    Agreed! but minus the money you just described a camp trip around here lol. But i guess camp trips are typically a weekend for a reason! (Break out another thousand, I like it.)
    Keep laughing
    Jim
     
  9. LongAgoLEO

    LongAgoLEO Guide

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    Yes! A lot of creative, floating artwork on the water. I have a portfolio of similar pictures of these unique vessels I've captured on film over the years. Some folks refer to this as maritime trailer-trash. I think they're wonderful. And for the most part, so are the captains and their crews/families of these floating castles.
     
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  10. saxonaxe

    saxonaxe Scout

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    I rather like the green coloured craft top left, it has the look of a square rigger lost amongst more modern vessels, like the Bimini awning rigged one, bottom right. [​IMG]
     
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  11. redcanoe

    redcanoe Tracker

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    I lived aboard on various sailboats for a dozen years or so. It's a great lifestyle if you're suited for it. If you're going to stay 'plugged in' to shore life and try to keep a job, etc then you will likely be stuck at a marina, it's getting more difficult to find regions that will tolerate long term anchoring. But it's possible in more remote areas. If you're travelling a lot it's less of an issue. I liked being at anchor as much as possible, it opens up the most potential.
    IMO sailboats win hands down for independence and mobility. Don't get caught up in the fancy latest greatest bigger better ugly boat thing that's been happening for the last thirty years or so. Something very simple and very tough and very seaworthy as small as you can get away with according to your needs. Learn as much as you can about traditional boats in the age of working sail and cruising boats from the 'golden age', the authors of the late sixties and seventies. You will learn about simple gear that you can repair or jury rig or make yourself.
    Having said that, the 'sailing the farm' book you mention (by ken neumier or something like that) had a lot of wishful thinking and I think was written without a lot of experience. It has a few good ideas.
    Depending on the climate / area you plan on frequenting I think james wharram's catamarans are worth investigating as good designs for a seasteader. I had one for a while. It's not really a high latitude cold weather boat though. For that i'd still go monohull, something on traditional lines with low tech / low tension rigs that don't demand expensive gear and techy materials. And a woodstove. Twin keels can also be a good option for seasteading, opens up a few more options in where you can shelter..depends if you have that sort of coastline though.
    Oh..and learn to sail without an engine. Maybe you can find a boat cheap with a blown engine and just remove the thing...you'll have to shift some ballast and stowage around to keep the trim right. You will become a vastly better sailor and will remove a big source of expense and worry and dependence.
    Reef before you need to, when you start to think about it. Get a bigger anchor. And a good kedge anchor.
    Find a cheap scrappy dinghy to row ashore so you can leave it on the beach without worrying about it. If it looks super sketchy and has a moderate leak it'll discourage the thieves and ne'er do wells.
    My two bits. Have fun. I'll be out there again someday, row over for coffee.
     
  12. redcanoe

    redcanoe Tracker

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    oh.. I see the word 'seasteading' has been co-opted by some techno utopians building islands. that's not what I meant by it.

    read Bernard moitessier's ' a sea vagabond's world' and 'the long way'. Brian Toss 'the rigger's apprentice'. Everything by John Leather. The older books by Lynn and Larry Pardy. Practical Junk Rig by Blondie Hassler... 'voyaging on a small income' by annie hill is a bit optimistic, but might get you off on the right foot. There's a bunch more, you'll find them.
     
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  13. LongAgoLEO

    LongAgoLEO Guide

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    Totally cool. When I was single, I envisioned something along these lines. Even had the boat on layaway. Life changes. Have had a number of lifelong marina friends who have done similar retirement stints, along with some doing the Great Loop under power, or just resettling downriver, etc. Very enviable.
     
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  14. Biker Bushcraft

    Biker Bushcraft Scout

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    My wife and I lived aboard and cruised for 19 years. Only recently did we move on land (3 years ago). Misconceptions about a boat, such as that it is cramped, has no shower and is like camping, could not be further from reality. Our current boat, a 35' trimaran, has plenty of room, has a shower, hot water, a wood/coal stove, and everything our house has except extra room. I look at how much space I actually live in and a boat accommodates that. The rest of the space in the house is for stuff. Living on a boat you discover how little "stuff" you need.
    The skills I learned as a sailor, and live aboard, translate well to bushcraft. The independent spirit of a cruising sailor also translates well to bushcraft. 150 miles off shore you learn quickly to be self reliant, to self rescue, to handle emergencies with the resources at hand.
    We did not live completely off the land/sea. We provisioned for passages, grew a few herbs on board, but mostly for my wife's amusement. We have not added a water maker because we had plenty of tankage and were cruising developed countries. We do have a catchment system. We have solar and had wind on our old boat but did not like the noise. Because we built our current boat, there is not a single part we cannot repair, replace, or substitute.
    As for the BOAT acronym, yes, generally true. Try restoring an old wood boat with the misconception that you will make all the expensive pieces and you will learn quickly the cost of bronze and copper fasteners and the other hardware needed to build a boat. The cost of hard woods will put you into shock and locating long pieces of teak is maddening.
    I would not trade the years we cruised for anything and would do it again in a heart beat. The boat community is amazing. The experience of bringing your home to a different place, country or culture cannot be described. Even the dockside communities that exist in every marina are unique and closer than any neighborhood I have lived in on land.
     
  15. LongAgoLEO

    LongAgoLEO Guide

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    Very, very cool. You were a lucky man to spend 2-decades plying adventurous waters!

    I enjoyed knowing I could throw off a line, turn on the motors and have complete autonomy to go anywhere and have all my worldly possessions safely tucked onboard. (Although we did have a house full of stuff we'd have to leave behind - and I was good with that, too. Wife? Not so much.) And spot-on about restoring boats. I tackled a 1969 40' Post, a wooden sportfisherman with a flybridge, etc. What a job, especially putting together a new bottom (6/4" Honduran mahogany), new floors, sistering white oak frames, etc., and then splashing all that work below the waterline where no one but me could truly appreciate it. A lot of work. Pounded about 1,200' of cotton, set 2,500 screws, countersunk and plugged with grain-keeping wooden plugs along with all the sanding. Then moved up to the remainder of the boat. Finished nicely and enjoyed it for many years and my kids grew up on it. They're still river rats; just married with kids and living on or near the river now.

    One "finished" picture (although it was never finished).

    Windfall-Beached (b).jpg
     
  16. Biker Bushcraft

    Biker Bushcraft Scout

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    Awesome! Yep, when you can calk a wood boat you are officially a boatright.

    This is my favorite boat.
    IMG_1975 (2).jpg

    And here is our current boat.

    381.JPG
     
  17. LongAgoLEO

    LongAgoLEO Guide

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    What a dynamic picture of your favorite boat! Is the encapsulated portion of your current vessel a salon/chart-room/pilot station?

    I thought that was the route I was headed at one time. Made a couple of trips to Florida to scope out liveaboard motorsailers and had one in negotiations, but ended up with a (local) 60' glass houseboat (yeah, I know - regular maritime trailer trash). But, we weren't really going anywhere soon and had a half dozen other boats for gunkholing the weekends, including the restored Post above, and decided the houseboat layout provided a nice home base of sorts. Just a ton of room. After living on it for a bit, it really wasn't seaworthy anymore. Seaworthy maybe, but the knick-knacks and household items made us vulnerable. I feared an 8-degree roll off a moderate wake would have us picking up stuff all weekend. LOL

    This was the motorsailer I was on the brink of bringing home...

    46' Sea Parrot Motorsailer.jpg

    And this is what I actually ended up with (opposite nautical genres).

    Summer '09 - 594.JPG
     
  18. Biker Bushcraft

    Biker Bushcraft Scout

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    Looks like a CT41. Nice boat! Our first cruising boat was an Angleman Sea Spirit. Wooden but similar hull design and very sea kindly.
    Thank you! I used to single hand that boat all the time. She had not auxiliary but if you look along the bulwarks you will see two 16' sweeps. I would sail her in and out but had the sweeps as a back up in the dead calm.
    We purchased the trimaran as a bare hull and I added the pilot house, rig and everything else. The pilot house has a seating/sleeping area and wood stove. All rigging can be controlled from the two side cockpits right outside. After many years of sailing wet and cold I like being warm and dry and just reaching out the door to trim sails.
    Hard to find ocean access berthing for a houseboat here but that sure looks comfortable.
     
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  19. mtnoutdoors

    mtnoutdoors Prov 27:17 Supporter

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    I think if it's a boat house should not be that bad for room and other stuff. But if it's a sail boat or a deep see boat there is not a lot of room for anything at all. So it's up to you on what kind of boat you are looking at. Prov 27 : 17
     
  20. Crowe

    Crowe Tracker

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    A boat is a home that allows travel on water.eg Islands, waterways seas,oceans etc. It is expensive. Six miles an hour. Eight miles to the gallon plus regular maintenance And you are limited to the distance inland you can walk / cycle. There is no storage space. And. You are Always at the mercy of the weather ! and as for self sufficiency. NO, not possible
    I tell you this as an ex. Liveaboard for over Fifteen years ( Morgan O/I 416) east coast US and Caribbean. Had a truly great time.
    A more rational choice would be an RV. The US is a lovely place with many freedoms. Enjoy
     
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  21. LongAgoLEO

    LongAgoLEO Guide

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    Nicely done. It's a 46. And you and Crowe and some of the other sailors on this thread are way out of my league. I had limited sailing experience and nothing over 21'. I figured I'd be motoring until I acquired more skills. I was no Chapman. I can feel those free winds tugging at me reading these recounting by all of you. I need to stay guarded. Since retiring, I've sold or donated all but the smallest of boats and only do inland fishing now. Trying to spend more time under a tarp than a bimini.

    And yes, that fat sow of a boat afforded a rear statesroom with a walk-around queen bed, a mid-berth that included a head with shower & full bath and a captain's quarters and laundry; an upper galley with full sized appliances, dishwasher, wine cooler, etc. and a bar counter & stools configuration; a large salon with recliner, hide-a-bed, fireplace and the lower helm station. Below deck forward were two twin beds and another head & half bath. Topside was the upper helm and integrated booth seating (it was the largest of the three decks); a mid-deck with a 12x16 gazebo and then the back deck with the hatch to twin 454 EFI's and an 8.5 Westerbeke GenSet. The entire interior was maple flooring and birch cabinetry, so it felt light and airy. Onboard systems included 500g fuel, 500 fresh, 250 gray (with OB pump), and 500 black (with macerator & OB pump), 20g hot water and two reverse cycling heating/AC units (can't remember tonnage, but they were big). Speaking of tonnage, she was documented and displaced 57 net tons, but really had a shallow draft. Okay, enough already. I'll be shopping online again for boats before I know it. I think I'll go work on my kit now...
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2018
  22. Biker Bushcraft

    Biker Bushcraft Scout

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    lol, I was starting to feel guilty talking boats on a bushcraft forum too but when it's in your blood it is hard not to when someone gets you started.
    Interesting perspectives in this thread. As they say one man's ordeal is another man's adventure.
     
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  23. Seacapt.

    Seacapt. Supporter Supporter

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    Why feel guilty? The best "bushcrafting" my self and other friends have done has been out of canoes and trailerable sailboats camping on the shore or islands off the Maine coast and inland lake/rivers. Back in the day my buddy and I bought a engineless/powerless 28 ft. Chris Craft cabin cruiser for $500.00 and camped out on it free for 2 summers tied up to an abandoned back cove pier in Maine's Penobscot bay, great fun for us and our GFs at the time. GO Patriots
     
  24. Zunga

    Zunga Bushmaster

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    Oh my Lord! So jealous right now. That boat is the bee's knees! I would think you catch some windage in the back but nothing squirrly! Love it
    Jim
     
  25. dads2vette

    dads2vette Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    Interesting comments about them being cramped and no bathroom(?). Sure there are those models out there but you wouldn't use them for long term habitation. Heck, most of the fishing charters I've been on have bathrooms and we were only gone for 6-8 hours. Fuel costs? That's gotta be worked into the cost of living. You're not using fuel when moored. I plunked 8 grand down on a solar array when I moved out here. No one else I know had to pay that much on electricity when they moved into a house. Came with the territory. One of the biggest mistakes I've ever made(there's a list), could have bought a 40' charter boat in HI for $7k, owner is a lifelong friend, mooring was $160/month. He lived on that boat for 7 years before selling.
     
  26. LongAgoLEO

    LongAgoLEO Guide

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    Whoa... can see why this "mistake" made your list. I think I would have been all over that! My electric bill alone was over $160 per month.

    I found I could afford the boats; it was that high-rent real estate where I was slipping too many boats that was eating me alive. And the marina did not want a lot of dead wood piled-up on shore, so summer dry storage was twice as expensive as just splashing your boat and putting it in a slip.
     
  27. Seacapt.

    Seacapt. Supporter Supporter

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    10010431state of maine.jpg Couldn't resist, my live aboard boat for 4 years when I was a young lad, Training Vessel "State of Maine"
     
  28. saxonaxe

    saxonaxe Scout

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    " Eight miles to the gallon " Blimey Crowe, that is expensive, what was she a converted Destroyer? :18:

    [​IMG]

    Just over 1.5 litres of Diesel per hour at 5 knots ( 3 cylinder 30 HP Yanmar) So, 15 miles to a gallon current, tide and wind permitting?

    I found a voyaging life much cheaper than life ashore. I sailed her 95% of the time, only using the engine for berthing if I had to go into port for stores/fuel/fresh water. I shopped in local street markets,used local bus services to get about or my folding push bike. Did my own maintenance and servicing, and anchored when I could rather than go alongside and pay berthing fees. But I'm aware that living what could be a fairly spartan lifestyle does not appeal to everyone, but I was free...:D

    As Biker Bushcraft said earlier, the International cruising/ voyaging crowd are some of the best, most helpful people on the planet. I spliced a new forestay for an American cruiser berthed in Malta one winter, he sorted out an electrical problem I had aboard. No money changed hands. One seagoing wife was a hairstylist and looked after the cruising ladies, so the small fee she charged went to pay the winter berth cost.

    I speak of the world of ordinary voyaging folk, not the ' posh yachties' who are a different breed.
    Not much annoys me, but these " sailors" needed to steer clear of me...

    [​IMG]

    A Russian Billonaire, anchored South of Ibiza in the Balearic Islands.

    [​IMG]

    A Greek shipping Magnate, also in the anchorage.

    What used to annoy me was, they register their vessels in London which entitles them to fly a British ensign ( it also allows them to dodge their own country's taxes ) but at times their behaviour was not as it should be to poorer people. Being wealthy,in my opinion does not entitle anyone to forget about respect for anyone. Problem was (is) they wear my flag...

    But there was always something to smile about too. Anchored in the River Fal back home in England I was invited aboard this boat, anchored nearby. An English couple in their 70's, both fit and suntanned. I told them I was bound for the Mediterranean when the weather cleared. I asked where they had sailed from, " Oh, just sailed up from the Cape Verde Islands (Off West African Coast) we always sail down there for the winter, it's so much warmer you know. We've been going there since 1968....( That's 2,750 open Atlantic Ocean miles) :D :D

    Their boat is a converted 30 foot wooden, English fishing boat built in 1937 ...
    [​IMG]......:dblthumb:
     

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  29. saxonaxe

    saxonaxe Scout

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    :D Sampson posts and Derricks....Ha! those were the days Cap'n, proper ships...:18:

    [​IMG]

    1962. We loaded these strange brown...boxes..!! " What are they?" we asked,
    Sea containers..shipping containers..they said.
    " Doubt if that idea will catch on, we can't load those with the Derricks," we said.....:D
     
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  30. Seacapt.

    Seacapt. Supporter Supporter

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    And led to the demise of week or longer port stays when we could break sea watches and get a chance to do some local romancing and sight seeing." Those Were the Days" had a whole different meaning than Archie Bunker sitting around in his living room.
     
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  31. dads2vette

    dads2vette Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    The mistake was not buying the boat. The solar was one of the best buys. Currently my monthly averages to under $200 a month. Initial cost/length of stay. I haven't spent a dime on electricity since I installed the array. If you figure having to get new batteries every 5 years the average monthly should drop to $30-$40 a month. Really doesn't make any difference as I have no choice.
     
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  32. kairo

    kairo Supporter Supporter

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    To all of you who have the freedom and means to live-aboard and travel in your sailboats. You have no idea how jealous I am.
     
  33. Zunga

    Zunga Bushmaster

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    I don't have a boat but spent 30 days on one. Yup I get how jealous you are. That said. I've seen way better deals if you walk floats in far flung marinas. Example. Found a 30 ft Catalina. Needed a good scrub and some love. But ready to go. Off season $6000. It was a very nice boat for that money. For 1 to 2 people who are ok with each other's smells. That's a great boat. I was a 28 and we sailed a day rested a day and so on.
     
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  34. kairo

    kairo Supporter Supporter

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    I don't think my Girlfriend would go for it long term, but I, myself, would have absolutely no problem selling everything and bumming around the world for years on a sailboat. I don't mind cramped spaces or being alone. I can't even imagine the thrill of just pulling into a warm weather harbor in the middle of winter, touring the towns, eating local, interacting with the local people, and then when I've had my fill, just weighing anchor and heading to the next spot.

    Maybe someday.

    BTW, you're from BC. Know where Tahsis is? My folks have a condo up there where we go fishing in the summers. Have a 24' North River boat, but it's not a sailboat by any means.
     
  35. Zunga

    Zunga Bushmaster

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    To be honest I jumped in Google maps just now. It looks a inlet on west side of Vancouver island. That's the wild side. Exposed to open Pacific Ocean. Never ventured out there. Those are big boy waters LOL. I've done southern gulf islands to Cortez and back. Spent a lot of time on lasquetee and Texada islands. Both paradise on earth. I wanted to do the world tour thing. But started reading the horror stories of corrupt port officials seizing boats for profit and worse. Realized I've got a life time of sailing right here.
     
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  36. kairo

    kairo Supporter Supporter

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    Paradise on Earth sums it up pretty well. This is the view down the inlet.
    About halfway down that stretch of sea, turn right, motor for a half hour and you're in the Pacific.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  37. Zunga

    Zunga Bushmaster

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    Sir I've seen some pretty places in my own backyard. But that takes my breath away! This pic is my favorite swimming hole on Texada. I didn't take this pic. But have camped on shore to the right of the rock. All moss among cedars. Soft as a bed.
     

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  38. kairo

    kairo Supporter Supporter

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    Man, I love the Canadian landscapes. That whole Pacific NW Coast is among the prettiest landscapes on the planet in my opinion. From Nor Cal up to Alaska.

    I had a chance, many years ago, to take the co-pilot seat on a slow, single engine seaplane from the head of that inlet in my first picture down to Victoria. I didn't take any pictures because my face was stuck against the plane window the entire time. We cruised at about 500ft MSL all the way down the inlets, and the pilot even jaunted out over the pacific coast for a bit to let me look around. Just breathtaking.

    I live in the high desert of NV now. Pretty in its own right, but home for me will always be the Pacific Northwest.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2018
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  39. Zunga

    Zunga Bushmaster

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    From Washington border to Alaska is a life time of sailing, if you intend on seeing every corner. That's assuming you stay in the inside passage. Your side of the island is a whole other adventure.
    I don't know if you get out this way much. but there's a bring your own gear 3 day music fest every summer. On Texada called diversity. 3000 people on a beach with music blasting that can be heard a long way away. You buy a ticket bring your own gear food and water. Pitch a tent and have the time of your life! If you can come on a boat and anchor. What we did. You can live like a king in a outdoor night club. So much fun!
     
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  40. LongAgoLEO

    LongAgoLEO Guide

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    I got that; I just poorly conjugated the two points. I too would have done the boat and slip as you stated. Your slip being $160 which was what my electrical bill alone exceeded for my houseboat. The slips were by the foot and I was on the hook for 165' over 6 slips (houseboat took two end slips). Spendy real estate that you never really are purchasing. If I had not been so close to the metro (and 2-miles from my office; and 85-miles from my house), I'd have tried squatting behind the islands until run off by the sheriff, coast guard or modern-day pirates.

    Your solar array is enviable.

    I had an early effort on my home in '82, but they only circulated some kind of fluid to help heat the place. Maybe it only did the hot water. I don't remember. But it wasn't electrical and it didn't work well at whatever it did. But they were huge and ugly. Only pic I have that captures one (of three) that were on the roof. Doesn't look so bad in this pic, but they were obtrusive. Came with the house.

    Our Home In Maple Grove '82 (a).jpg
     
  41. dads2vette

    dads2vette Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    Gotcha. I was considering putting in a heated floor but that doesn't make sense for such a small space and(here's the real reason) 60 acres of juniper to use a heat fuel. I have so much downed wood and so little used every winter I'll never need to cut a live tree.

    I'm not sure who mentioned it but finding a marina that allows for a live aboard situation can be a challenge. Those that did around Buffalo, NY were few and usually had a waiting list for dock space.
     
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  42. LongAgoLEO

    LongAgoLEO Guide

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    Nice wood resource!

    Yes, it's getting harder and harder to find (fulltime) live-aboard marinas up this way. Our marina allowed me to live-aboard one winter (on shore), due to some unforeseen circumstances (and the number of boats I had at stake in the place). I was the only living, breathing soul in the place the entire winter. The following year they allowed summer live-aboards - and obviously so, not just unofficially so. Season after that, they allowed year around live-aboards. Within a couple of years the marina devolved into an eclectic collection of homemade float-homes, greenhouses and other unseemly contraptions. And while this tight-knit community of survivors (especially in winter) are second to none in hospitality and genuine spirit, the marina shut it all down and went back to recreational, seasonal use only. This has become a recurring theme up here. It DOES take some resilience to live-aboard through winters here, though.
     
  43. dads2vette

    dads2vette Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    One of the folks who lived year round had a bubbler around his boat during the winter. He was in a marina in the Niagara River that typically doesn't get as thick ice as Lake Erie.
    On a side note, that is one of the biggest things I had to get use to out here. What they call lake out here is kid of interesting. Kind of like what I thought was dry weather in NY.
     
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  44. Biker Bushcraft

    Biker Bushcraft Scout

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    Thanks! Surprisingly she is not really effected except for really heavy winds. Most of that can be offset with proper sail trim.
    Here is a little on the water action
     
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  45. LongAgoLEO

    LongAgoLEO Guide

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    LOL

    Yes, bubblers are an absolute. Multiples. I know the rig across from me did not bubble, but he was a 94' sea-going tug that had been converted to a live-aboard. I explored buying it as I knew the family well (retired, local pilot legend, etc.), but they ended up moving it to Corpus Christi before I could decide. That was a debacle ultimately. A rudder was stuck (probably in the bottom) when they tried to leave the marina and they basically ricocheted their way out to the river where they went in circles until they got it resolved. Nipped a few boats during that nerve-wracking exercise, getting all kittywampus in a narrow channel.


    Summer '09 - 663.jpg Summer '09 - 672.jpg
     
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  46. Zunga

    Zunga Bushmaster

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    That's sick! Noticed the port hole forward middle. Haven't spent any time on cat or tri boats. That suggests a lot more room than i thought. But from what I saw. Way less heal over. Great if not looking to scare the pants off the new guy LOL! It would roll less at anchor, as well id imagine. Sailed with guy who could only sleep on the lowest point of the floor. He was fine when awake but lying down messed with him. That was 28 ft fin keel. Shy of 9 ft beam, if I recall. She was a fat bottom girl and a little slow with storm sails. Only sails we had at the time. Came in handy when we set sail on the bottom edge of a gail warning. Heading south and away. Only saw one other boat for hours! And he was beyond insane! On a really small skin top cat. Just flying on one edge! We glassed him as long as we could. Afraid he was going to need help. But he had it handled. To give you idea of how nuts. We were running with the wind. Jib and main either side. The waves from the stern. Looked like they were going to break 10 ft up, on you. Then dive under boat and up and down you go! That was a return trip and super short compared to breeze that got us there. You probably heard my favorite sailing expression. "Days of boredom, punctuated by moments of blinding terror!" LOL I need the winning lotto ticket!
    Jim
     
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  47. Biker Bushcraft

    Biker Bushcraft Scout

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    I get sea sick in gentle rolling conditions but am fine then it gets rough. It hits different people in different ways.
    She is roomy inside but at the sacrifice of speed. She is a Piver Lodestar. Not known for their speed but the guy who built her had Jim Brown work over the design a bit and she is a little faster than most Pivers.
    The wooden boat I posted was 28' with 9' beam. She was a great little cutter but not fast by modern standards. Still she has won races. I had a trip where I got blown out 12 miles from home and had to head back. It would have taken me a week to beat my way up the coast and I only had 2 days. Coming back was just like you described. Running down wind and with the seas I was over hull speed, sailing wing and wing (Main and staysail off one side jib off the other. I was over canvassed and needed to reduce sail but the seas were coming from directly behind me so there was no way to let go the tiller without rounding down. Seas were about 12' so I couldn't get in the trough without broaching. Ultimately I had to just hold on and keep her headed down wind. I made 10 miles in slightly over an hour. That was one heck of a ride!
    "Days of boredom, punctuated by moments of blinding terror!" is absolutely true and one of my favorite sayings.
     
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  48. Zunga

    Zunga Bushmaster

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    Rounding down I guess is what happened when leaving port that day. Captain passed me the tiller to tend to somthing. I guess I was off. We had hard wind and currents clashing at the mouth of the harbour. Boat healed over like it took big broadside wave. I started to fight it. Captain took over and let her go right round. Fiddled with the canvas and off we went. I got a healthy dose of stink eye! LOL
     
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  49. CharClothed

    CharClothed Guide

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    Just a thought, but if you had a smaller size paddle boat which you used for transporting the boat along the water, could you anchor it, and then have the paddles move in the other direction as a hydro power source?
     
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  50. bartman

    bartman Supporter Supporter

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    That is right up my wheelhouse (pun intended). I'd love to see a river tug converted to live aboard. I've been watching different vids over the last 2-3 regarding alternate living situations (i.e tiny houses, liveaboard boats, etc.) and I always come back to this. Might have alot to do with being a pilot for the last 24 years...lol. Here's a pic of my current ride...not liveaboard ready, but she's an able bodied girl. M/V Niantic:
    123951.jpg
     
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