Boomerangs

Discussion in 'Other Tools' started by Wasp, Sep 3, 2017.

  1. Wasp

    Wasp Hobbyist Hobbyist Supporter

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    Anyone ever throw a boomerang for fun maybe at home or camp? Seems like it would be entertaining, light, small, cheap. They start at about $20 and go up. See what I did there?
    Some look cool too. This is made from the same kind of wood as an airplane propeller.
    [​IMG]

    Or have any of you used a boomerang for food procurement? These are different and usually heavier and don't come back to you. Coldsteel has one made from poly, but I'm betting you can make your own pretty easily.
     
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  2. OrienM

    OrienM Guide

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    I played with returning boomerangs some as a kid (scary IMO, lol :eek:) and messed around with 'rabbit sticks', non-returning ones, as a teen/young adult. I always made my own, just an elbow-shaped, slightly flattened heavy hardwood billet, whirled along the ground at about rabbit-head height. I never managed to actually kill anything with the rabbit stick, but it was an extremely popular hunting tool here prehistorically...I figure I'm just a bad shot. :4:
     
  3. Gumbi

    Gumbi Guide Bushclass I

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    I bought a plastic boomerang at the dollar store when I was a kid. I still have it and get it out to play with at times. It's a fun challenge to throw it consistently so that it will return.
    I'm not sure how you could use a returning boomerang for hunting. I've never seen it done, so it would be fascinating to learn how. Maybe if you threw it into a dense flock of birds...
     
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  4. arleigh

    arleigh Guide

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    Dad made me a hand full of them when I was a 10 year old kid in the city , out of 1/4" plywood . I'd go the the school yard on the week end when it was empty and practice .
    Learning the wind and the boomers eventually you get the hang of putting it where you want it . Beat having to run after it all the time, but i never hunted with it.
    Later years we moved to the mountains, but in the mountains there were too many trees and the winds were unreliable . eventually lost interest to other things like, slings, bow and arrows and fire arms .
     
  5. Lazy J

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    I tried using them for hunting after watching a demonstration by Indigenous Australians. The hunting boomerangs they were using were different to the standard shape - more weighted at one end and really sliced through the air. Needless to say I couldn't hit anything, takes a lot of practice to get it accurate.
     
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  6. TRYKER

    TRYKER Scout

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    none, and i mean none !!! of the ones i bought came with a return policy !!! (pun intended)
     
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  7. happywanderer

    happywanderer Scout

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    I made a couple of rabbit sticks out of oak branches. My 7-year-old son and I like to practice on stuffed toys--one a rabbit and the other a squirrel. 20170903_180640.jpg
     
  8. arleigh

    arleigh Guide

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    A great deal of has to do with luck due to the wind changing, but it's a chance better than none, if your hunting for food especially birds .
    Getting it to return depends on throwing it into the wind and predicting the curve by the tilt you put into it.
    generally speaking , facing the wind and casting it at about a 45 degree angle to your right ,it will circle in the wind and come back around, NEVER take your eyes off of it .
    If there is no wind ,and the round is clear you can throw it like a lawn mower about 3' off the ground for a very long ways. much like a frizby .
    Mark your place and the direction of the wind. tell tail flags can help greatly .
     
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  9. Winterhorse

    Winterhorse Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    DSCN1374.JPG
    I'll put up a picture of mine in a little bit. It was given to my dad by an Aboriginal Australian about forty years ago. The first time I ever threw one I, "Thought it back" at about ten years old and it nearly took my head off.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2017
  10. Swarvegorilla

    Swarvegorilla Scout

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    Had tonnes of fun mucking around with them. Never tried to kill anything with one tho.
     
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  11. Wasp

    Wasp Hobbyist Hobbyist Supporter

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    I thought it would be fun at home or camp, like horse shoes. The size would make it easily packable.
     
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  12. Sbrody

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    Did someone say boomerang? 20170904_145129.jpg
     
  13. arleigh

    arleigh Guide

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    The advent of ply wood and plastics ,sure gave us a lot more to play with.
     
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  14. DavidJAFO

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  15. Olde woodsman

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    I used to throw boomerangs a lot when I was younger. If I remember correctly, boomerangs that fly in a circle and return are regarded as children's toys. "Real" boomerangs are throwing sticks that curve in flight to get at game that is hidden behind a tree, bush, or rock. A hunter knows his tool and can be very effective at putting small game on the table.
     
  16. Wasp

    Wasp Hobbyist Hobbyist Supporter

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    I don't know if I would consider them "toys", but entertainment might be more like it. But yes, I don't believe returning ones are used for hunting which I mentioned in my first post. I think a throw stick boomerang is equivalent to a slingshot to some degree.
     
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  17. hivernant

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    My brother brought me cheap touristy one from Australia when he was on R & R from Vietnam, but I never could do any good with it. I guess it is all about practice and determination. My dad used to tell me stories of him and his brothers bringing home rabbits using a claw hammer like a rabbit stick.
     
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  18. spotslayer

    spotslayer Tinder Gatherer

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  19. Wasp

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    Pretty good explanation of how to throw, types, etc. he also says you can hunt birds with returning knes.

     
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  20. Sbrody

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    Good info from the video. I used to throw a lot. I have been through many boomerangs. Some you could easy toss and catch with one hand. Some you had to whip hard to get it spinning so it would take proper flight. Some had a caution sticker advising you to just watch and not try to catch! They are all different. All of them enjoyable.
     
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  21. OldMan

    OldMan Artist, Trapper, Hunter, all around woods bum Supporter

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    As a young teenager I got one from a store made of a lot heavier wood than I'd expected. It took quite a bit to get it to return in flight and doing so was more like a U than an O and you had to run to the side to catch it like a frisbee. It was heavy though and easier to set up sticks in the distance as targets to aim for than do the whole return to you thing. In trying to catch it I got slammed in the chest with it and it knocked me on my ass. My friend broke his hand trying to catch it. In later years the ones I saw in the toy sections of stores were much much lighter weight and different wood.
     
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  22. Izabarack

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    Boomerangs were often thrown into a flock of rising ducks, for example. The chances of hitting something in a couple of hundred bird flock is pretty high. The returning feature allowed a second go if nothing was hit first time. The curving arc of a returning boomerang keeps it in the kill zone longer than that of a stick that flies straight through a flock of birds. Throwing a returning boomerang over water makes retrieval a lot easier if nothing is hit. It does not take much to break a bird's wing and the first Australians would take a couple of boomerangs if hunting birds. Heavier, less aerodynamically sophisticated boomerangs/throwing sticks were used against land based animals that would run off when disturbed. The hunters could pick up the boomerangs as they ran after or to the hunted animal.

    Iza
     
  23. Fullerbear

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    This thread brought back a good memory! The first time and only time I ever used a boomerang I threw it straight down the neighborhood street. The wind caught it and I watched in horror as it landed in our neighbors backyard. The old man came out and tossed it in his garage before slamming the door shut to his house. The boomerang belonged to my older brother, he wasn't happy and neither of us went to retrieve it from the old man! :]
     
  24. hooliganwithheart

    hooliganwithheart Scout

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    Used a boomerang or two as a kid as had friends that moved over that way and would bring back one or two on visits. I always remember being terrified every time one come back at me but smiling big time :D

    Haven't thought of these since :oops: forgetting things now :11: :18:
     

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