Boundry Water October Canoe Trip Planning, Gear, and Food Thread

Discussion in 'Iowa' started by IAOutdoors, Feb 17, 2019.

  1. IAOutdoors

    IAOutdoors Supporter Supporter

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    Posting a new thread for the Boundray Water canoe trip. Beings we have the group thats going thought I would start a new thread to clean things up. This will be a thread on planning, gear, and food preparation for the October trip. @actichy ,@Kurt992 ,@Cro , @Haggis , @Scotchmon
     
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  2. Scotchmon

    Scotchmon Supporter Supporter

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    And those were going to be my next questions!
     
  3. Scotchmon

    Scotchmon Supporter Supporter

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    So what’s the general consensus for meals? Do you bother with a cooler for a couple meals early on? It seems like the cooler would be a pain once it’s empty.
    Do most go with freeze dried/ dehydrated food? I’m not picky when it comes to food, but I do like my coffee.
    Thoughts/ experience?
     
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  4. IAOutdoors

    IAOutdoors Supporter Supporter

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    I think we were talking taking a good meal ( something grilling wise for the first night). Thinking we may just be able to freeze and keep in a small cooler until the trip and then just keep the meat in a ziplock and let it thaw on the trip. More than anything I will be going with freeze dried for most of the meals but hoping to have a stable supply of fish.
     
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  5. IAOutdoors

    IAOutdoors Supporter Supporter

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    I am going to try a couple sample packs from Pack-It Gourmet and Heather’s Choice freeze dried foods. I will let you guys know how it goes.
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2019
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  6. IAOutdoors

    IAOutdoors Supporter Supporter

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    If you guys are good with oatmeal in the morning I can pick up a case of Quaker oatmeal from the product store for cheap and bring it up. I am partial to maple brown sugar flavor but can get a different flavor if someone wants also.
     
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  7. Kurt992

    Kurt992 Guide Lifetime Supporter Bushclass II

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    Sounds good to me. I haven’t had one I didn’t like.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2019
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  8. actichy

    actichy Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    I like the strawberry and peach flavors, too
     
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  9. Scotchmon

    Scotchmon Supporter Supporter

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    All the above sound good. I thought maybe a soft side cooler could work and be packed flat later.
     
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  10. Kurt992

    Kurt992 Guide Lifetime Supporter Bushclass II

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    There is no reason that wouldn’t work. Most of the commercially made food packs are foam insulated, so they are in essence, a large soft sided cooler. Hard salami and low moisture cheese can go unrefrigerated for quite a while and make for a good lunch.

    Since each of the canoes on this trip are self sufficient, each pair of guys can decide what they want to take food wise without affecting the others. I’ve done trips where the group shared one food supply and I’ve done trips where each canoe took care of themselves. With a larger groups like this, the latter seemed to work best. Everyone gets to each what they want when they want it.
     
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  11. Cro

    Cro American Grouch Hobbyist Lifetime Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I Bushclass Instructor

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    Agree with Kurt above.

    From my own packing perspective I'll have dehydrated meals, enough for one main meal per day and then oatmeal or similar for breakfast. When I can I'd supplement this with fish and small game. Our trip falls in small game season as well as the Minnesota archery season. I might pack my take down bow as a result, haven't decided yet. For those considering it, a small .22 pistol or such would put small game in the pot fairly easily. Just a fyi.

    While I'll whip up a single cup of coffee in the morning I've had good results from a MTN Ops Yeti before I start out and then a MTN Ops enduro after lunch. First is energy second is re hydration, recovery. I've been using these since 2016 and have had excellent results, especially when living and hunting in the mountains in Utah and Colorado. Carrying a pack and strenuous activity at elevation is a butt kicker, so can paddling be in stiff headwinds etc. Certainly not necessary but they are something I swear by.

    From a food perspective it's usually Mountain House, however I do also pack assorted gels and bars, usually with caffeine in them for quick calories and pick me ups for paddling before noon. I like the Honey Stinger Gel for this purpose. Usually keep them in my vest or chest pack pockets.

    I will be bringing my water filter for sure, and recommend at least one per boat and as a back up some potable aqua tablets. My filter is the older version of the MSR and allows me to do 4L at a time and is about four times faster than a pump or a sawyer. Here's the latest version of the MSR, I cannot say enough good things about this filter system. I originally wrote about it here: Water in the Backwoods, that was 2012 and I'm still using the same one though I have since purchased another filter. This rig has seen use in the BW several several times as well as Colorado, Whyoming, Idaho, Utah, and Alaska. I couldn't guess the total number of liters of water it has purified and it has never let me down.

    While eating from the mountain house bags makes clean up easy, on the occasion where food is cooked and consumed via plate or bowl I like the easy packing and clean up of these Fozzils. I've been know to unsnap 'em and lick 'em clean. They're great for oatmeal and ramen etc. Incidentally, hot spicy ramen noodles on cloudy cold rainy days is the ticket. Wish I had a dollar for every meal I've cooked on my MSR Pocket Rocket inside my tent/tarp since I started using one. I bought the one I'm still using back in 2002ish and I've never had an issue. I don't know if the gen 1 is still available or not, Gen 2 looks pretty good too though. MSR Pocket Rocket Gen 2. I do use the canister stand with mine, I don't like balancing on the canister/stove alone. The canister stands are cheap, reliable, and worth it.

    It's doubtful that bugs will be much of an issue but depending upon how wet or warm our fall is they could be. They don't really simmer down that much until after a couple good frosts. I've had them buggin the crap out of me clear into late October during the warmer wetter years. I always take a bug net at a minimum, weighs next to nothing and it's solid insurance against the little buggers. My favorite is the Outdoor Research Bug Bucket but I'm not sure they still make it. Something like this works well too, since I personally prefer boonie hats while paddling: Mosquito Net Hat

    I'm sure you all have your navigation gear sorted out, the only thing I would toss out there is you don't need a cell signal for GPS use on most smart phones, at least the androids I am familiar with. With something like Backcountry navigator or similar software you can download your maps in advance and thus not need cell signal to use them. Most have bigger screens than dedicated GPS units and with the smart phone in airplane mode your battery lasts a good lone while. As a side, this also allows me to bring whatever books I want without the bulk. The kindle app for android lets you use it just like a kindle and have a couple titles on hand. I often read late at night or when and if I get socked in from bad weather. YMMV

    Speaking of reading material, I highly highly recommend this book in particular prior to our departure. It's two stories of survival in the BW. Lost in the Wild. You may have already read it, it's just one of my favorites and there's a few things one can learn from the accounts.

    You all have probably already sorted your sleeping gear as well though I'll toss out some copper regarding pads. If you're planning to hang then you can safely ignore this bit. I know the Thermarest Xtherm is a spendy pad, there's no denying that. Mine has had several hundreds of nights spent on it and it's still going strong. I do protect it by keeping it in my bivy sack and paying attention to where I place it. I bring it up because some campsites, especially islands if we do that, will have precious little soft ground but will have relatively flat rock. I've slept on my share of rocks and if care is taken then the inflatable pads of quality make are fine. I still carry a puncture kit even so. The Xtherm can make the hardest ground soft and they are some of the warmest pads out there. A good nights sleep without hard cold spots is a damn fine luxury in paddle country. They keep the soreness to a minimum.

    I used to be a summer time hanger and all else ground pounder. I gave up hammocks several years back because I simply never could get a good nights sleep in one. I'm a side and stomach sleeper and just never could get hanging to be what I wanted it to be. If you're hanging I'm sure you've got a handle on quilt use etc etc. I've know hangers to get cold even in August at night when they didn't bring the correct under quilt etc. I'm not advising hangers, you guys do your thing and I'm sure you know what you're doing. October camping in the BW can see some unexpectedly cold nights, just an FYI.
     
  12. Scotchmon

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    I like that idea. The largest group I’ve boated with was 16 people. That was on a 28 day trip through the Grand Canyon. Food and meals were a big deal on that trip. The group was divided into teams and we rotated through meal times/groover(latrine) duties.
    Even lunches were an affair and always included a table set up to accommodate our food. Some days it seemed like we barely finished breakfast and we were already pulling off for lunch. Since each meal was planned, to not eat it would have been wasted. I think I actually gained weight on that trip!
    Do most pack food similar a back packing trip? The 3 lb/day guideline always seemed heavy to me. Personally I can function on much less.
    As long as there’s plenty of coffee!:)

    I’d think one food barrel/pack per boat?
     
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  13. Kurt992

    Kurt992 Guide Lifetime Supporter Bushclass II

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    Lots of good stuff in the post above by Cro. I'll be checking into his suggestions.

    Here's some of my go to gear/ideas
    • Big Agnes Q-Core insulated sleeping pad.
    • The aforementioned Ramen for lunch.
    • Sea to Summit Head Net.
    • Luci Light solar lantern
    • Sawyer 4 liter gravity filter
    • Stanley 48" plastic level case for fishing rod storage. It jams nicely into the rear of a Minnesota II, just behind the carry handle. Stays there during portaging. (Pictured)
    • One jar of crunchy peanut butter. Great for boosting calories. I'll share, but I'll tell you up front that I'm a double dipper! Best to bring your own.
    • Resealable bucket for food. I get my food grade buckets from the local HyVee Bakery. Thats what their frosting comes in and they give them away if you ask. As you can see from the picture below, you never know what might get into your food pack if you're not careful.
    IMG_1861.jpg

    IMG_0408.JPG
     
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  14. Cro

    Cro American Grouch Hobbyist Lifetime Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I Bushclass Instructor

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    Barrels are fine but I don't typically use them. I use a dry bag and a rope, sling it up and pull it up high. If island sleeping a decent distance from shore I don't bother much at all. I've seen bear in the BW but I've never had trouble with one. I personally prefer to use the dry bag on food stuffs because I can still shove it in my pack. Barrels typically nearly guarantee multiple portage requirements. The exception to this would be the barrel hauling packs, as long as you can fit the rest of your gear in it. The Granite Gear version is exceptional, shameless plus as they're made right here in my home town.

    Buckets are a little easier than barrels, the non boat carrying person on the portage can manage them and his own pack fairly easily provided the handles are good.
     
  15. Kurt992

    Kurt992 Guide Lifetime Supporter Bushclass II

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    For this trip, I'll do the dry bag for food, but I'll bring the bucket just in case someone needs it. It fits perfectly into a pack I have so that it can be carried on the chest opposite a portage pack.

    Plus 1 on the Granite Gear. I have the Superior 1 Portage pack.
     
  16. Scotchmon

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    It would be nice to fit all food and gear into one pack for one trip portages. I just mentioned the barrel since it had been mentioned in a post.
     
  17. actichy

    actichy Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    When I went we had hard salami and cheese sandwiches for lunch. We used regular bread, but pita bread is easier to pack in my view. I think Hudson Bay bread would be good on a trip like this.

    I've been looking at Cache Lake dehydrated meals. Does anyone have experience with them?
     
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  18. Cro

    Cro American Grouch Hobbyist Lifetime Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I Bushclass Instructor

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    In my experience pita bread is easier to pack and lasts longer for sure. I've no experience with the Cache Lake meals.
     
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  19. Scotchmon

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    Tortillas hold up pretty well, too.
     
  20. Haggis

    Haggis Bushmaster

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    In interest of full eating disclosure,,, when in the bush, I only eat oatmeal, morning and lunch, and frybread for supper. Usually, along and along, I can catch a fish, a rabbit, or some such for protein...

    Minute oatmeal with a bit of cinnamon and stevia; a one cup portion in a ziplock baggie. Just add boiling water...
    Selfrising flour; a one cup portion in a ziplock baggie. Mixed with water in the baggie, and fried in olive oil.
    And black tea,,, 100 bags at least... I won’t, all told, average drinking a full glass of plain water any given year...
    Most generally, Herself will sneak a small jar of peanut butter, and a bunch of granola bars in my food bag, and most generally I carry it all back home...
    A brightly colored dry bag holds the lot.

    I’ve a bunch canoe packs, but my current favorite is the Granite Gear Superior One,,, easiest most comfortable pack I’ve ever carried on a portage...

    I have a water filter, it doesn’t weigh much, so I carry it, but since I boil all my water anyway, it doesn’t see much use. Unless I use it to filter water to mix my frybread dough...

    I’ll most likely have a Coleman 550b white gas piggyback stove. It weighs the same as a Svea 123, can produce twice the heat, easier to light, and it will simmer at a very low setting...

    I carry a lightweight shower bag,,, difficult to stay upwind of myself...
    My wool clothes can be hung in the wind to air out some,,, the wind doesn’t help me much...
     
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  21. Scotchmon

    Scotchmon Supporter Supporter

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    I’m liking the meal plans more and more! Easy, no heavy weight kitchen supplies, dishes to a minimum. That means more time to fish!
    I’m a happy camper with simple grub to feed the hump. Oh, and did I mention coffee???
     
  22. Kurt992

    Kurt992 Guide Lifetime Supporter Bushclass II

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    Starbucks Via French Roast. 2 in the canteen cup each morning and some spares for emergencies.

    The heaviest kitchen item I sound have is a folding handle fry pan. I hope to fry fish often.

    I'm going with a MSR Universal stove, between Cro and I, we'll have it and a pocket rocket.
     
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  23. actichy

    actichy Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    I have a Cooke Custom Sewing portage pack that'll hold a lot of gear.

    I'm still trying to figure out what shelter to bring. I have several tarps and a Koretemp shelter half and poncho along with a bug net. I have a backpacking tent, but it's pretty cramped inside.
     
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  24. Haggis

    Haggis Bushmaster

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    If @Scotchmon is ok with it, I can fetch along a Sierra Designs Mountain Guide Tarp,,, floorless, but airy and roomy enough for two ground dwellers, and their gear...
     
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  25. Kurt992

    Kurt992 Guide Lifetime Supporter Bushclass II

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    I’m going to go with a freestanding tent because it gives me more options for shelter sites. I’m looking at picking up a Nemo Dagger 2p. I have their older Losi model and it is very well built, but a little on the heavy side for a 2p.
     
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  26. Scotchmon

    Scotchmon Supporter Supporter

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    I have several options but will most likely go with an MSR Hubba Hubba and a BCO 10x10 tarp. I could go much lighter, with the Six Moons Gatewood Cape/1p bug tent, but in the event of rain .... that would not be too comfortable for any extended length of time .
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2019
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  27. IAOutdoors

    IAOutdoors Supporter Supporter

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    I am leaning towards my Warbonet hammock with a BCO Tarp and an over and underquilt. Probably bring a HPG Serape for around camp and added warmth at night when I need it. Might have to try the new BCO poncho liner out.
     
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  28. Cro

    Cro American Grouch Hobbyist Lifetime Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I Bushclass Instructor

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    For shelter I'll be doing one of the following, I just haven't made my mind up yet.

    BCO tarp with Enlightened Equipment Recon Bivy.
    BCO Tarp with Outdoor Research Highland Bivy.
    BCO Kore shelter half w Kore poncho.

    Alternatively, if I run a Kifaru I'd have to choose between the Tut, Megatarp, Supertarp. Paratarp, or the Paratipi.

    I'm having a hard time deciding.

    Regardless of shelter type I'll be using a 20 degree EE quilt over a thermarest Xtherm.
     
  29. Kurt992

    Kurt992 Guide Lifetime Supporter Bushclass II

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    I’m guessing we’ll have enough BCO tarps along to cover the infield during rain delays.
     
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  30. Kurt992

    Kurt992 Guide Lifetime Supporter Bushclass II

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    The Minnesota DNR sent an email out about this years fishing license prices and such if anyone is interested in seeing what they will cost.

    Minnesota Fishing Licenses
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2019
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  31. Sagebrusher

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  32. Haggis

    Haggis Bushmaster

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    Ricing is an odd bird,,, Boom and bust,,, some years the rice is too short to harvest by canoe, other years the wind get to it before ricing can begin...

    I have friends I rice with in good years,,, Never as late as October...
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2019
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  33. Sagebrusher

    Sagebrusher Tracker

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    Yeah, I was wondering if that was too late in the season.
     
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  34. Haggis

    Haggis Bushmaster

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    I just checked,,, season is August 15 to September 30, but the rice is likely down by the end of season anyway... One good storm can really change the results of the season, or the length of time there is to harvest rice.
     
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  35. Kurt992

    Kurt992 Guide Lifetime Supporter Bushclass II

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    93E7DDBC-0325-48D4-926E-20060E714645.jpeg
    March 8-10, 2019, Madison, WI


    “What is Canoecopia?
    Canoecopia is the largest paddlesports consumer event in the world. More than 250,000 square feet of kayaks, canoes, stand up paddleboards, outdoor equipment and clothing, all at the best prices of the season, make Canoecopia a "must go" place for gear! Over 180 seminars and clinics make Canoecopia an educational event where you can learn about the perfect gear for your style of paddling, develop skills to get you where you want to go, and discover some of the many places to paddle, both near and far.”

    I have a training obligation that weekend, otherwise I think I would be on the road for this one.

    http://www.canoecopia.com/canoecopia/page.asp?pgid=1001
     
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  36. Scotchmon

    Scotchmon Supporter Supporter

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    It’s been a couple years since I’ve attended. Now that I have an interest in the BWCA , I’ve been thinking about going as there are several presentations on the area.
    Of course I’d need to cruise the gear booths. Last time I came home with a sweet Badger Paddles Beaver Tail.
     
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  37. IAOutdoors

    IAOutdoors Supporter Supporter

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    What are you guys thinking for boating footwear?Should still be warm enough in the day to get away with like a muck slip on shoe or water shoe like Keen shouldn’t it?
     
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  38. frog4334

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    You guys are pros so you may already know this: If for some reason you decide you want to take a cooler:
    I went for 7 days with some older guys that go every year back when I was a young. We were in canoes as no motors were allowed. They had filled used milk jugs with dry ice and put them in the coolers. That's been many years ago so some details have faded but I believe we had steaks on the last night before we paddled out and I know we had bacon and eggs every morning. Enjoy your trip!
     
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  39. Sagebrusher

    Sagebrusher Tracker

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    That's what we did in 1985, except we used regular ice. 2 people can carry a cooler on a portage, along with other gear. Steaks, etc, the first night in, bacon and eggs the first 2 mornings.
     
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  40. Scotchmon

    Scotchmon Supporter Supporter

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    At cooler temps I like either Chota hippies/ and a low volume water shoe or Chota mukluks.While I prefer to kneel with my feet under the seat, sooner or later I usually need to get off my knees so low volume makes for easier entry and exit.
    It would be my guess that something with a substantial sole, toe protection and will not pull off in mud may be in order for the portages.
    If the canoe has tractor type seating it would be my guess that configuration is more conducive for seated hit and switch paddling so a beefier sole could be worn.
    @Haggis, what type of seats are in your boat?
     
  41. Haggis

    Haggis Bushmaster

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    Woven nylon straps, but I tie in some of those thin foam kneeing pads to sit on. Later, the pads can be used in camp when sitting on the ubiquitous fire-grate-side logs. A soft and dry place to sit makes camp a bit more comfortable...
     
  42. Cro

    Cro American Grouch Hobbyist Lifetime Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I Bushclass Instructor

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    I've found the NRS Boundary Dry Boots to be the ticket for later season BW travel. Just my opinion though.
     
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  43. Scotchmon

    Scotchmon Supporter Supporter

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    Yep, those or the newer version of the Chota. My mukluks are the original version and those have a pretty low volume (thin) sole. They worked great under the deck of my kayak, but I will most likely be upgrading to the NRS.
    The Chotas were my off river boot in the Grand Canyon early on the trip, and man, they were RANK by the end of the month! Almost threw them away, but a few douches with Mirazyme took care of much of the STENCH.
    Funny thing, one of the females visited me in my tent one evening ( no, not for sex!) and all I could smell were those boots and my manky socks!
    Or was it her??????
     
  44. Kurt992

    Kurt992 Guide Lifetime Supporter Bushclass II

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    I went radio silent this past week in Colorado, but it didn’t keep me from thinking about this trip.

    23677265-2909-4186-A77C-4496FF71DBC1.jpeg




    For footwear, I’ll probably go with my usual Goretex hiking boots and a pair of Salomon Techamphibians for around camp. I’ll add a set of Outdoor Research gaiters to keep some water out if I step in too deep.

    But those NRS are looking like a good option as well. I may have to check them out.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2019
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  45. Kurt992

    Kurt992 Guide Lifetime Supporter Bushclass II

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    I hit the clearances at Cabelas yesterday and picked up this Helinox Chair One for $66.00. Not sure if it will make the cut for this trip, but it was a good score anyway. For me, a comfortable bed and a comfortable seat are worth a little extra weight.

    8172C898-3012-43A8-A3FF-48E9EA4BB71C.jpeg
     
  46. DuctTape

    DuctTape Scout

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    If you guys are interested, I will share our menu plan for my upcoming Quetico trip.
     
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  47. Kurt992

    Kurt992 Guide Lifetime Supporter Bushclass II

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    Sounds good to me. I’m not very creative when it coms to meals, so anything I can learn from others is appreciated.
     
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  48. DuctTape

    DuctTape Scout

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    I hope the copy/paste formats ok.

    Quetico with Russ Alt route
    Park night Trip night/date Breakfast Lunch Dinner Lake
    Day 1 Put in (Dan’s at Steve’s in Thunder Bay) (Dan’s at Steve’s) pick up Russ at the airport Dan: Frozen at home, ready to eat at camp or at Steve’s Steve’s or drive 2 hrs and start from French Lake by 4, take first available site on French or Pickerel Lake, within 3.5 mi
    Day 2 Russ’ Granola w/fruit, powdered milk Dan: venison to grill (frozen from Steve’s), Vigo red beans and rice Team: Dan: fish, oil, bisquick, tru lemon po,
    Russ: a side 2 back to French River, 3.5, 5 short portages, to Baptism L (p, b, w)
    Day 3 Russ: Fish Tacos w/avocado
    Dan brings coffee for whole trip Dan: Bean Cheese Burritos: Tortillas, po. Beans, Jack cheese Team Fish stir fry with fresh vegetables, peanut sauce
    Dan: oil and bisquick for all the fish frying. Explore one (2 mi rt) or both (2nd is 3mi rt) lakes E of Baptism (1 mi), short portage, 1 mi to sites on Trousers Lake (p)
    Day 4 Team:
    Russ: camp bread,
    Dan: Fried fish (bisquick, oil, tru lemon po) Dan: Tortellini with dried sauce Team Curried fish 1 or 2 mi to p3410 (2.1 mi) portage, 1 mi to 4 star sites on Cache L (LT, Wh, P)
    Day 5 Dan: Mexican: Po eggs, Jack cheese, dried salsa, tortillas, coffee Russ: Pasta salad with pepperoni (rehydrate pasta in morn) Dan: Sweet and Sour fish
    1.9 mi portage to Lindsay Lake (no fish info, linked to McKenzie) 1-2 mi to a 3 star site on McKenzie (LT, Wh, P, W)
    Day 6 Dan: raisin bran, po milk, walnuts
    Dan: Roast trout, crackers, mayo, large onion, oil to fry onion Russ: Stroganoff
    Dan to bring 1 lb dried venison 3 side trips from McKenzie, order depending on which site we get. If just W of portage, start with 4 mi to the lone site on Ferguson L (LT, Wh, P), or do this when returning.
    Day 7 Russ: Powdered eggs, swiss cheese (1/4 lb), dried mushrooms etc, camp bread No cook lunch: Russ: Swiss Cheese, crackers, mustard, summer sausage Russ: Bear Creek Potato soup with dried green beans, Fried fish If 2 mi SSE of the Lindsay p, start with, 2.5 mi to p1650m to Belaire, arr early as there’s only 1 site
    Day 8 Dan: Dried Sweet Potato Breakfast Russ: Knorr Butter Rice & added dried veggies,
    Dan; Fish, bisquick, oil, lemon juice Dan: curried lentils and rice with fish, powder to make 1c coconut milk, ¼ c shredded unsweetened coconut, and 1/2c raisins or currants. Return to McKenzie, side trip 2 mi rt from the elbow of the p1650 from Belaire to the two lakes NE of it, then 4.5 mi SW on McKenzie
    Day 9 Dan: dried rice pudding
    Dan: Black Bean, Rice, corn, w/salsa Team Fish stir fry with dried vegetables, peanut sauce
    3.5 mi + p650m to the 4 star site on McKenzie bay of Kawnipi L (LT, Wh, P, B, W)
    Day 10 Russ’ Granola w/fruit, powdered milk Dan: fried fish with mayo and onion on crackers, oil to fry onion Dan: Team Sweet and Sour fish 3.5 mi + p650m back to 3 star site on McKenzie along the not yet explored shore, exploring back bays (another mile or two).
    Day 11 Team:
    Russ: camp bread,
    Dan: Fried fish (bisquick, oil, tru lemon po) Russ: Pasta (Orichette) with mushroom sauce.
    Dan: Fish, bisquick, oil, lemon juice Russ: Stroganoff
    Dan to bring 1 lb dried venison 5 mi to the p3080m back to Cache L, 1 or 2 mi to 4 star site
    Day 12 Dan: Mexican: Po eggs, Jack cheese, dried salsa, tortillas, coffee Dan: Bean Cheese Burritos: Tortillas, po. Beans, Jack cheese Russ: Bear Creek Potato soup with dried green beans, Fried fish 1 or 2 mi to 3410 portage + 0.3 to 4 star site on Trousers L, or 2.5 mi more to the 3 star site on Baptism L
    Day 13 Russ’ Granola w/fruit, powdered milk No cook lunch:
    Russ: Swiss Cheese, crackers, mustard, summer sausage 5 mi (add 2.7 if we stayed on Trouser l) + 4 short portages to takeout, 1.7 hr drive to Steve’s in Thunder Bay
     
  49. Sagebrusher

    Sagebrusher Tracker

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    It's early summer Boundary Waters weather today in Iowa! :)
     
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  50. Haggis

    Haggis Bushmaster

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    Rubber boots are sure heavy,,, to wear or carry,,, don’t always fully serve if disembarking or embarking waters be much deep.

    Leather boots get wet and stay wet. I suppose liners could be worn, but liners won’t help in knee deep water.

    I’ve always done rubber boots or leather shoes,,, always been miserable,,, never been remotely delighted with either.

    Even early October can be chilly this far north,,, staying dry or having the ability to get dry quickly would be pleasing enough I reckon...

    Gonna talk to a 30-something friend about what he wears canoeing,,, he isn’t handicapped by my nigh religious “old school first” mentality...
     

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