Budget bottom insulation

Discussion in 'Hammocks' started by deeder, May 11, 2015.

  1. deeder

    deeder Tracker

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    Just food for thought, went to the local goodwill few months back and got a wool throw for $3. This past weekend we had a number friends/family spend the night. My options were the floor or hammock. I went with the hammock. I used the throw as bottom insulation, and it worked great. Only got down to 60-62 deg but I was way comfy. So if you are looking for a cheap alternative to an under quilt for summer/fall try it out.
     
  2. Zebra Alpha

    Zebra Alpha In Memorium

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    Thanks for the tip.

    I'm wondering what would work for temps down to the 30's and maybe as low as 20's... it's not unusual to get those temps in the mountains in Colorado, even in July.

    What would someone recommend for camping in the Rockies in a hammock? (New to hammocks... just got one, won't use it until maybe next week, at the soonest.)

    Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated!
     
  3. backlasher

    backlasher Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    It doesn't get that cold in Texas but I use one of the long, double bottom hammocks from these guys.
    http://www.mosquitohammock.com/
    I put a thermorest solar pad in it and a sleeping bag if it's really cold, a wool blanket otherwise. With that said, I'd probably go to ground in the Rockies. The big problem with hammocks is the wind underneath, it sucks the heat right out of you. Experiment in the backyard and find what works for you. You might want to read The Ultimate Hang by Derek Hansen and watch the youtube videos by Shug. Good luck.
     
  4. quietmike

    quietmike Hardwoodsman Supporter

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    For the 30s and definitely the 20s, I'd use a dedicated underquilt.
     
  5. Scratch4x4

    Scratch4x4 Guide

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    I've tried a diy PLUQ and a wool blanket before biting the bullet and getting a proper under quilt.

    The wool blanket I took down to the mid 40s, and thought I was going to die.

    The PLUQ, with a wool blanket down to the mid 40s was quite a bit more comfortable. Neither the wool blanket nor the PLUQ are pack friendly though. Being both bulky, and the wool heavy.

    The UQ I picked up for about $110 shipped was a world of difference. Combined with a sleeping bag in the hammock, I got down to the low 20s, with snow and freezing rain. I had to open up the sleeping bag a few times to cool off.

    Any decent UQ will be, in my limited experience, a vast improvement over most alternatives.

    Here's the UQ I got on a budget. Sure, there are nicer, lighter, warmer, smaller packing quilts available. But I can attest that this one works great.
    http://www.snugpak.com/outdoor/hammock-under-blanket#
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2015
  6. geneaut

    geneaut Scout

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    The best answer is a dedicated underquilt.

    However, for car camping I've taken a blue foam camp mat and 2 hanks of reflectix insulation down to the low 30s with very little problem. That's about $20 of product. My main problem with that was making sure I didn't let parts of my body loose contact with the pads ( that's where the 2 pads of reflectix came in as I basically had them 2 wide in the bottom of the hammock with the blue foam camp mat on top of them).
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2015
  7. ra2bach

    ra2bach Bushmaster

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    a sheet of reflectix with a wool blanket doubled up over it got me through a night cold enough that I could see my breath when I went to bed...
     
  8. L.V

    L.V Guide Bushclass I

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    Car windshield frost / heat shields .. They cost like $2 and weights next to nothing. Could be used also as extra in ground. The ones with closed cell foam (basicly a semi transparent packaging foam) and aluminium foil.
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2015
  9. ra2bach

    ra2bach Bushmaster

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    I think this material is commonly called reflectix except reflectix is like thin bubble wrap with a reflective surface on both sides. can be bought pretty cheap in 16, 24, and I believe 48" wide rolls at home improvement stores.

    it is a total vapor barrier surface, so if sleeping directly on it, it'll be a little soupy...
     
  10. Dimner

    Dimner Guide

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    I was comfy down to 40 degrees with a czech wool blanket and one of those grabber emergency tarp/blankets as my bottom layer earlier this spring. It dipped to 35 degrees one of the nights and I didnt sleep so good until sunrise, but i managed. I think the wool worked very well insulating while the emergency tarp reflected heat back to me.
     
  11. riverjoe

    riverjoe You d Supporter

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    I get too clammy with a pad or reflectix .build yourself an insulated hmock .
     
  12. The Hunter

    The Hunter Scout

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    After fighting the cold for many years I traded or sold off all of my Hennessey's because I don't like UQ's and the added expense that comes with them. They are just not for me so I went back to the ground, however after talking to some friends that went on a winter trip in the Ozarks I purchased a double bottom WB bkbird xlc and an exped down mat. The mat stays in place and give the option that if I need to go to the ground I can but most importantly it keeps you plenty warm on the bottom side. You don't get the sweaty clammy feeling either like laying on CCF.
     

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