Bug in Bug out--consider this.

Discussion in 'Preparedness' started by werewolf won, Sep 14, 2018.

  1. werewolf won

    werewolf won TANSTAAFL Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Parts of New England went up in explosions last night. Over pressurized gas lines are at first blush the cause. We keep hearing about how foreign countries can gain control of computers and attack infrastructure without ever invading, I’d imagine that type of attack could be exactly what was happening last night, or it could be as simple as missed maintenance or human error, but it does give one pause.

    People always talk about bugging in vs. bugging out, here is a situation where the homes were filling will gas and becoming potential bombs, bugging out was the only safe option. Best to plan for either option.
     
  2. NevadaBlue

    NevadaBlue Graybeard Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    Another reason for having your home as autonomous as possible. We recently got a questionnaire about interest in having natural gas. NOPE, I have propane and I control that. I also have backup supplies of propane. Any simple event can shut off the natural gas or even burn down you house, as we see.
     
  3. Top Gibson

    Top Gibson Supporter Supporter

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    I live in a rural area....no big cities for many, many miles. My plan is to stay put during a disaster, if possible. I'm all electric on utilities, but also have a wood burning fireplace (and a propane grill). So unless a tornado hits my house, I plan on being here.
     
  4. Unistat76

    Unistat76 Nerd Supporter Bushclass I

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    I agree, prepare for both.

    I think this is really a false dilemma. Initially, most prepare to bug out because it is easier and cheaper. If and when you become more involved in prepping, bug in becomes more attractive because of your investment (and capabilities.)

    But really, the scenario is what should dictate your response.
     
  5. central joe

    central joe Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Also don't forget, at least in S.C. natural gas is required to have a shutoff at the meter. Some scenarios bug out, some in. Be prepared. joe
     
  6. PACoureurDuBois

    PACoureurDuBois Scout

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    Not that I'm a fan of being super dependent on grid right now, but my entire house is electric. Heat, stove, everything. But the pro is, I've been designing a battery bank and solar upgrades, and also should we lose power I have a generator to run the essentials and at least keep the place heated.
     
  7. Unistat76

    Unistat76 Nerd Supporter Bushclass I

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    We have a family of four, each with our own BoBs. We also have a bug out box that has supplies and shelter for a more long term situation. It's really a chest, 2 large duffels, and a collection of buckets now.

    I've recently started to beef up my "bug out box." The idea is to have a way make a more permanent shelter and to gather food and water without as much reliance on consumable items carried with us. This is the basis of Creek Stewart's Non-Con (Non-Consumable) book.

    Ideally I would like to stage the BoBox off site as a cache. Since I don't have a fixed bug out property, I may ask my cousin to stash it in the rafters of his garage.
     
  8. arleigh

    arleigh Guide

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    I am going to have to consider moving my camper back onto my truck and reloading it for bug out ,even though I plan to bug in .
    Not for high water ,I'm well above flood zones.
    Not for fire, seeing most combustibles are at a safe distance , except if you add wind. which can fierce .
    I have water and food for a year or more and all the usual other needs ,even grain and seeds for planting if I have to garden again.
    If I have to go in foot I have a cart i built for that purpose and I can modify it as I go if need be good for 300+lbs I use it on the property hauling trash and other chores proving it's capacity .
    DSCN4138.JPG
    The solid rubber wheels are from an old wheel chair who's framework has failed . But this proves to be a very useful tool .
    This frame work is electrical conduit and the joints are sold for swap meet canopies from the hard ware store.
    It can be completely disassembled and stowed in the trunk of a car, and re assembled in many different configurations to suit the need.
    One could put a hammock in it and sleep . be sure an lock the wheels though . It can also be the framework for a tent .
    I am planning on making some cargo netting for bug out hauling but i'm open to other means as well . perhaps the tent it's self can be a cargo bed .
    Point is I plan for different means of bugging depending on the event.
     
  9. werewolf won

    werewolf won TANSTAAFL Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Having been involved with both natural and LP gas I’ll tell you from real world experience not sales brochures natural is 100% safer. Any time you introduce a flammable product into your house there are potential dangers be it gas leaks, chimney fires, poisonous by products of combustion, throwing your back out splitting wood etc.

    This event did not matter if you had gas in your house or not, the neighbor’s did or the gas pipes were in the street. I do not plan to leave my house if there are any other options, but after this I am considering the chances that I may not have the option to stay and putting some options in place.
     
  10. Malpaso

    Malpaso Tracker

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    Early report is that high pressure gas was introduced into a low pressure line.
     
  11. werewolf won

    werewolf won TANSTAAFL Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Thanks for the update!!


    Human error or sabotage? Mass has one of the strictest gas codes in the country—I assume that above and beyond code may have saved a lot of lives yesterday.
     
  12. oddjob35

    oddjob35 Scout

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    I have to agree that it is probably best to prepare for both no matter your preference.

    My preference is to Bug IN and hunker down. I have my supplies, tools and luxuries at home. Far easier to stay put with some "hardening" and proper planning, especially at my age!! LOL

    BUT … what happens when you are "forced" to get out … evacuation orders due to an uncontrolled forest fire, an incoming hurricane (see the Carolinas with Hurricane Florence right now!), chemical spill or similar! There may be a need to get out of your home for safety's sake, so I do have some plans (probably need to be tightened up and possibly extended) for getting out from the home just in case. My "bug OUT" plan involves getting to family about 5 hours drive away and using their back yard as a campground. It will almost be like Glamping!! Better than having to just go aimlessly or relying on FEMA type facilities and allows for use of some luxuries like toilets/baths etc. That also has the side effect of not needing to carry quite so much as we would if we were going totally self reliant to some wilderness location with no facilities at all or to some FEMA site with unknown facility/item availability. Of course we offer a reciprocal agreement to our family if they ever HAVE to leave their home. As an extra benefit to this arrangement it means we would probably avoid most of the major evacuation routes (once we have managed to get out of town) and would therefore hopefully have an easier journey.

    Just some of my thoughts.

    OJ
     
  13. Tangotag

    Tangotag Field Gear Junkie Supporter Bushclass I

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    This is a good reminder. Thanks for the post. We had a localized evacuation in the spring. As a result I'm planning to get squared away for both bug-in and bug-out situations. When you experience an evacuation, you tend to take it a little more seriously after the fact.
    Organization is the biggest key to doing well over prepping stuff. A few little things can make your experience more comfortable. Knowing you have what you need with you gives you piece of mind.

    If I'd been better organized and had solid communications with family members our experience would have gone much smoother regarding the evacuation.
     
  14. Gary V

    Gary V Scout

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    Earlier this year our furnace broke down in the dead of winter and it took a month to get it repaired. We got through it comfortably with 1 kerosene heater and a few small electric ones. The only issue was it's very expensive to heat with either of those. White kerosene is near $4/gal. Our kitchen stove is a combo gas burners with electric oven. We can use the oven to heat or cook on gas when the power is out. We have a large generator as well. Water comes from our well so we never run dry. We're on high ground so flooding isn't a concern. Unless there is a tornado or other situation that might cause us to evacuate we can get by just fine.

    Just think about what can go wrong and have a back up system for heat, cooking and water. Water is the toughest one if you're on a city supply. The most basic and cheap thing to do is to have 4 or 6 of those blue 5 gal water jugs handy. There's bound to be a supply somewhere where you can fill them. Not convenient but doable. Bugging in makes a lot more sense then out if the situation permits but you have to prepare.
     
  15. Fat Old Man

    Fat Old Man Perpetual Student Supporter

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    I'm also in a rural area about 90 miles East of Memphis and 40-odd miles SW of Jackson. A couple of years ago, Memphis occupied the 1st and Jackson the 3rd slots of the most violent cities per capita in the USA. (I-40 drug corridor) My concern is what sewage will come draining out both locations when the SHTF...:33:

    EDIT: I highly recommend for anyone seriously interested in the whole survival/SHTF/Bug-out scenario to visit https://shtfschool.com/
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2018
  16. werewolf won

    werewolf won TANSTAAFL Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I live in the rural areas by choice. I can burn wood if needed, I keep water, foods etc. I’d like to hope I’m isolated from civil disturbances, I’m far from the ocean, not in a typical tornado area but if the nuclear plant goes critical, or the gas company starts blowing up houses or the forest around me bursts into flames my hopes of staying in my home may fall by the way side pretty quick.
     
  17. Fat Old Man

    Fat Old Man Perpetual Student Supporter

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    I would add some type of braking device...300# of momentum can be difficult to arrest!
     
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  18. GoKartz

    GoKartz Sharpaholic

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    I think the first time I stopped to reconsider bugging out was a couple years ago with the wildfires in Gatlinburg (at the time, there was a strong possibly we lived near there, and that we’d have to leave). During that period my wife and I sat down and figured out how we’d play the that, especially since at the time we had a newborn. Although I think “bugging out” focus can be misplaced, there are definitely times when getting out of dodge is the only option. I remember growing up and practicing home fire drills - fire exits, fire ladder for the upstairs, place to meet, 2 alternate places to meet, etc.; I think it’s much the same.
     
  19. Glock Holiday

    Glock Holiday Scout

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    Certain areas will have to bug out when the super volcano erupts, soon
     
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  20. Unistat76

    Unistat76 Nerd Supporter Bushclass I

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    I always had to keep bug out as an option due to the fact that I have an enormous chemical plant in my town. We have community warning siren tests and announcements every Saturday at 11:00 am.

    Worse case scenario: We're all poisond in our sleep.

    Other worse case scenario: We all blow up in a toxic explosion.
     
  21. marbleman

    marbleman Supporter Supporter

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    In the early 1980's, a backhoe hit and broke a gas regulator in a nearby small town. There was a backup mechanism of some kind that failed (I'm not a gas guy, don't know). In seconds there were hundreds of fires, as hot water heaters/furnaces suddenly had many, many times the low pressure they were designed for. Most of them immediately became giant fireballs. Some homeowners that were home, could shut off the gas and put out the fire. Most of them became empty lots.

    The city's first (correct) response was to shut off all the gas at some point upstream. This was also in January, it was cold.
     
  22. arleigh

    arleigh Guide

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    I cannot understand not having a back up system.
    Most stand alone machinery has some sort of back up ,and if it doesn't , epic failure is eminent .
    Why not have a back up system on your gas line as well ?
    Did you know that earth quake valves are available for gas systems ?
     
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  23. Sandcut

    Sandcut Sed ego sum homo indomitus Vendor

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    Normalcy bias is why.

    Also, folks in CA may know this stuff, but earthquakes aren't common back east. As such, what may be de rigueur in engineering on the west coast is unheard of or scoffed at (see normalcy bias again) on the east. We don't put hurricane clips to attach our roof ing in the NE, but they are required to in the SE. But we still get hurricanes in the NE.
     
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  24. GoKartz

    GoKartz Sharpaholic

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    To speak to that - my wife grew up in the SE and never knew what those wall mounting brackets were until I told her after we got married. Most people in the SE don’t use them, but I can’t remember growing up without them (in WA and CA).
     
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  25. Seacapt.

    Seacapt. Supporter Supporter

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    At my age I'm definitely bugging IN. My home is in a rural woodsy area on edge of a lake anyway and I know all my neighbors mind sets and capabilities as far as holding down the home forts go. No gas worries here but if the house burns down my separate 2 car garage with small insulated workshop that is all equipped with basic living needs will be my housing until main house is rebuilt.
     
  26. MAD Punty

    MAD Punty Supporter Supporter

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    I think everyone should have certain preps that give them options for bugging in or bugging out. I don't mean just preppers, either. I mean anyone with a family. At the very least, 5 days or so of food and water, candles, gel stoves or something that you can heat a room or cook on, medications, fire extinguisher, first aid kit...and a bag that you can grab and go at a moment's notice.

    This country was founded by Minutemen. What were "minutemen"? People that were prepared to be ready and out the door in one minute's time. These are the people that fought and won the Revolutionary war.

    Today, we would call them "preppers". In fact...I might just drop that term altogether...television ruined it, intentionally, I think.

    I think I'll just use "modern minuteman" instead. I like that. If you're ready to go in one minute, you're a minuteman, or minutewoman. Isn't that the goal we are trying to get to, anyway?

    "I'm not a prepper, I'm a modern minuteman, thank you very much."

    I like it.
     
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