Bug out bags\ bushcraft bags

Discussion in 'Preparedness' started by Knifeguy510, Feb 11, 2018.

  1. Knifeguy510

    Knifeguy510 Scout

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    Hi all so i am at the point where i am ready to start putting togther 72 hour bags for myself and my wife and 7 year old son. Its funny how i got into all this it started 5 or 6 years ago when i decided i was sick of carring crappy pocket knives and wanted to get a good knife. Started doing some research wich led me to bug out bags and bush craft. While makeing 3 separate 72 hour bags seemed a bit daunting and expensive at the time. So i kinda put in on the back burner and got into knife collecting and bush craft and hiking. Now im at the point where i have more than one of some things ie more than 1 canteen\water bottle cooking pot head lamp knives more than 1 pack and so on. That led me to thinking about taking the pots packs head lamps and sleepin bags i dont regularly use and setting up at least 2 72 hour bags for my wife and I. So back to the world wide web i went to read up on 72 hour bags. From alot of articles I read the theem I get is less is more you do not wanna be bogged down by gear you can get by without. Like bringing a tarp as opposed to a tent and learning to procure water and disinfect it instead of carrying it. Learning to build shelter instead of carring a big tent. Having a fishing kit and learning to forage instead of carring a bunch of food. So that got me to thinking I already have a bug out bag packed and ready to go its my bushcraft kit. It meets all the criteria of a 72 hour bag mabey depending on the time of year on the way out the door grabing some xtra clothes and food .Wich would not take too long if my bag was already packed. What are your thoughts on this. So instead of me makin another pack full of stuff i never use. That takes up space in my small appartment. I could out togther a buchcraft pack for her and that covers the basics water shelter fire food and some odds and ends. Plus my son is 7 so he can carry his own personal items . Any thoughts here?
     
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  2. blind & lost

    blind & lost Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Depends on the purpose of your bag(s). Blizzard, nor'easter, toxic spill, etc? Walking, driving, going to motel, relatives? With a wife and child, I would consider a tent somehow. A lot to think about since three people are involved. Good luck.
     
  3. HunterX9

    HunterX9 Scout

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    Sounds like a solid idea. Having the pack be both 72hr and bushcraft makes it more likely you’ll be in there and able to switch out things that are likely to expire. I’d keep any gear that’s strictly one of the other more easily accessible so it can be switched out. What pack are you using?
     
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  4. NevadaBlue

    NevadaBlue Graybeard Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    Hmmm... yes, purpose is helpful. A pack with 3 days of food, some basic shelter supplies and a cooking method is simple, but will it do for what you need? Season is ultra important, given your location.

    I wouldn't worry about 'bugging out'. It won't work.
     
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  5. ArkansasFan

    ArkansasFan Scout

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    I think we have another thread for this specific concept.

    1. Do you need to bug OUT or bug IN? History isn't replete with either.

    2. If you bug out, do you know where you're going?

    3. Should a disaster strike, is camping gear (or bushcraft) the equipment you really think you'll need?

    4. What circumstances would necessitate you bugging out?

    5. If you really have to evacuate are you geared toward coming back or staying away from home forever, e.g. losing everything?

    I was just reviewing my pseudo-BOB last night. In our society, sans some unlikely "return to the stone age" scenario (when even the best prepared will die), economic preps (money & access to more of it), communications both making and continued powering, information backup and security, and being as healthy and well as you can be beforehand, all probably trump cool stuff like Cordura bags, hand axes, LED lights, titanium cookery, etc.

    I consider myself well prepared but admittedly don't even have a communications plan or more than two evacuation routes selected.

    Welcome to the bug out rabbit hole. It's more of a black hole really because you never make it back out.
     
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  6. Seeker

    Seeker Woods Bum Supporter Bushclass I

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    I see where you live in RI... Look at a population map of the country, and then compare a known disaster to a known place of safety and your own experience in rush hour traffic... If you know about it, likely EVERYbody knows about it. Next time there's a hurricane, watch the news for footage of evac routes out of Miami, Orlando, New Orleans, and Houston. It's a 3 day parking lot with no hotel rooms available at any price up to a normal 8 hour drive away... Again, look at your particular corner of the world, and think about what is realistic. What's the likely cause for flight? and where are you going? and can you start a new life there, or live long enough to go back?

    You mention foraging as it's lighter... Foraging is hard work... you will make no distance. Modern food is light and well worth carrying.

    Move South, find a place in the country, get to know your neighbors, learn to hunt, fish, and garden, try to get as self sufficient as you can. The alternative is live in/near a big city and learn to live with the Damocles Sword of life there.
     
  7. Knifeguy510

    Knifeguy510 Scout

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    That is always in the back of my head also. It really does seem like bugging out will not work with a wife and small child. But bugging in? I dont own i rent. Also im not talking idk hurricane tornado or something where we will leave for safety and come back. I mean like shtf leave and never come back stuff. I would most likly try to avoid buging out if possible. But if i have no choice.
     
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  8. NevadaBlue

    NevadaBlue Graybeard Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    I do understand your concern. If I were in your place, with no other option (moving, etc), I think I would plan to stay put till the tide goes out. Of course, that can be difficult to impossible. Food, water, etc, supplies in a small apartment.
    I would not worry about it. Live your life, enjoy it the best you can and keep an ear to the ground. In reality, like has been said in this thread, even the best prepared will go down most likely, in the event of a SHTF event.
     
  9. Knifeguy510

    Knifeguy510 Scout

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    My point exactly i dont wana be alice! I just wana have a few bags with some basic survival gear mabey e days worth of food and enough gear to at least to attempt to survive for anothe week or two until we figurw out whats next. Just so we are not franticly grabbibg things frome the backpack\survival gear closet. Just bags ready to go that we dont have to think about just grab and get the hell out .Then set up camp somewhere regroup and mabey i go back for a few other odds and ends mabdy not .I dont own land for a bug out cabin . Honestly id probly head to my favorite camping spot about 30 miles from my house and figure it out from there. Its mind boggleing trying to think about every possible thing terro attack what have you so i really dont want to no 1 perso can carry that much crap anyway. But if my skills are more knowledge based i do not need as much stuff. Dave Canterbury had a good vid on having more know how than stuff and a having the tools to construct and make alot of the things you need.with a good knife hatchet saw and 1 or 2 quality tarps i can construct a very suitable shelter for us. And with snares traps fishing line and a good rifle feed us. Obviously these skills need to be learnd but knowledge weighs less than a tent and mres . of course if i wasent walking then things change but im figuring that when somthing big goes down its gona be gridlock anyway and gas only lasts so long. I just see alot of vids with these over sized packs that look to weigh at least 70 lbs. I seem to think going light is better. Thanks for everyones replys I usually get a reminder when i get them but i did not.
     
  10. Knifeguy510

    Knifeguy510 Scout

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    I am already planing on moving i hate the city. RI is no New York but still more populated than i like. But i was planing on going north. I like the colder climates. Get some land a cabin and bug in there. But for now im stuck here . not alot of places for me to bug out to around here.
     
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  11. Knifeguy510

    Knifeguy510 Scout

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    For shure im not a big "prepper". Im a bushcrafter\ nature enthusiasts. Just wana have a small bag of stuff i know will get mw through a couple days i can grab without haveing to think oh my god what do i bring. And not have it be a fully loaded Ible that wheighs 100 lbs. I think my buahcraft kit will do well enough as you said even the most prepared will perish. At least i wont perish with a hernia lol.
     
  12. Knifeguy510

    Knifeguy510 Scout

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    I have many but latley my woods bumming pack has been the S.O.C. 3 day pass well made pack and not too much $. I also have a 70 liter modern style hiking pack as well as a 40 liter moden style hiking pack. The 40 liter is for my wife 70 for me.
     
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  13. Knifeguy510

    Knifeguy510 Scout

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    Latley i have had my eye on the Ll bean continental ruck for a more classic looming bushcraft pack. The 80 dollar one not the canvas one.
     
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  14. NevadaBlue

    NevadaBlue Graybeard Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    :D

    Pack your gear like you said in the first post. Put good, freeze dried food in it, even ramen will work though. Keep the bags packed, grab the water on the way out the door. Then no worries. What you need for a bushcraft weekend will serve for your security bag too.
    Old man jabbering...
     
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  15. marbleman

    marbleman Supporter Supporter

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  16. mtnoutdoors

    mtnoutdoors Prov 27:17 Supporter

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    It's hard to say what u really need to do because iam not in your shoes. But if I need to I would get a bag for you,wife,and child and one more with gear that you would need. If you have any weapons like.a gun have a can of ammo or two and keep them ready. To grab when you need then. And my be the one bag the you use for your gear is the one you use for your bushcraft gear in at all time. This is just my thoughts on this. Prov 27 : 17
     
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  17. Todd1hd

    Todd1hd Supporter Supporter

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    OK a lot of folks will disagree with me on this, but you are thinkin way too hard here. In a populated area like yours, if you have to leave due to some emergency, there will be plenty of supplies available for three days. And you won't starve to death in three days anyhow. Hungry yes, starve no. And if your disaster lasts more than three days, you have bigger problems than a 72 hour bag will handle anyhow. Throw some warm clothes and maybe a sleeping bag or two together, a way to make a fire and some freeze dried food and water and sleep well tonight.
     
  18. HunterX9

    HunterX9 Scout

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    I actually just picked up one of those in gun metal. Looks solid and everything I’ve read on this site from other members all are really positive.

    I don’t consider myself a prepper either and am just getting back into bushcraft. But like the Boy Scout motto always be prepared. Something you can also do to lighten some of the pack weight is store some of the heavier items in your car. I keep some extra clothes, water, a tarp, and a Italian mess kit with packs of ramen with my spare tire. Larger first aid kit under the back seat.
     
  19. ArkansasFan

    ArkansasFan Scout

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    As I've said on countless forums, if the lights are still on, I'm bugging out to a hotel with some survival gear, a fair share of personal protection gear, and the same crap I'd take on vacation. The thing I fear most in a disaster is being separated from or others trying to take my stuff or my family. If it were just me, I wouldn't prep much at all especially in an urban setting.
     
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  20. nomad orphan

    nomad orphan Tracker

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    Good on you!

    Even my dogs carry their fair share.

    Redundancy. Then teamwork.
    Each should be self contained.... then add comfort to the pack. For instance.. my dog carries: her boots, food, water, first aid, and a horse blanket wrapped in oilskin.
    We share.

    Use your kit. Maybe 4 times a year? Each season?
    Then you will get to practice and have to replentish your gear. You will alos get to adjust for the learning curve.

    A nalgene wide mouth makes a big bob or a great tosser in er....
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2018
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  21. ArkansasFan

    ArkansasFan Scout

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    I think the problem lies in the concept of a fictitious, One Second After or a Red Dawn type of event. You just can't prepare for that.

    Now, what can you prepare for?

    Home security
    Extended power outage or other service/utility interruption
    Pandemic
    (Insert Crisis) > run on grocery and hardware stores
    House fire
    Wildfire
    Any number of meteorologic phenomena
    Any number of geologic phenomena
    Chemical spill
    Regional nuclear power plant crisis

    Home invasion (maybe just a fugitive loose in the area)
    Thieves
    Active shooter
    Medical emergencies (albeit the layman mostly is best able to train for minor traumas and environmental hazards)
    Getting lost (wilderness) or stranded (airport)
    General safety
    Vehicle annoyances

    Other than being lost in the wilderness, the bushcrafty skill set doesn't convey well to most of these real life scenarios.

    But if Red Dawn happens, I want all you Bushcrafty, old Infantrymen with me. If One Second After happens, I want an engineer like Engineer775 to design and rebuild, a dentist for obvious reasons, and anybody with a green thumb because you better start loving veges. Beyond that, a large animal veterinarian or rancher skilled in animal science, something like an experienced army ranger to teach the rest of us light/small unit and direct action skills, and an archivist trained to meaningfully comb through the printed knowledge of man would be my next three picks.
     
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  22. LongChinJon

    LongChinJon Guide

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    There is a lot of good (along with some questionable) info on this sight in the preparedness section of the forum.

    As others said above, don't start with the idea of "bugging out" (evacuating). Start by looking at what disasters are most likely to affect you at home or on the road, then figure out what would keep you and your family comfortable and safe during those times. I live in a hurricane-prone area where folks usually have a couple of days' notice to get ready. People out West may keep evacuation bags by the door to leave quickly in the event of fast-moving wildfires. What hazards are faced in your area? Blizzards? Power outages? The possibility of being stuck in your vehicle overnight during sub-zero weather? Chemical releases?

    Keeping extra food, water, batteries, and medicines in your home is great for disasters and for times when cash is short. It also gives you more options...some disasters are more easily faced by staying home than by evacuating.

    Figure out what you need to stay the night if you are stranded in your vehicle with your family, and keep it in your car. Yoh are more likely to stay with your vehicle than to leave it in most cases, right?

    And finally, don't neglect asking for help. In any disaster or emergency, you find people wanting to help. You can sleep in a tent if you want, but you might find a sympathetic church minister who will allow your family to stay rent-free for a few days in a room of the church, especially if you let him know you are willing to mow the grass, etc. Most of us don't like asking for help, but in a disaster, most folks tend to help their neighbors.

    Just a few thoughts.


    Edited to add:
    It's normal to think of disasters as either a doomsday scenario or as a romanticized adventure. I have found them to be more stressful, incredibly fatiguing, and usually less fun. As much as I love the outdoors, a private, climate-controlled room at the local motel or with family sure wins out here.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2018
  23. Knifeguy510

    Knifeguy510 Scout

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    Hey it took me years ro realize this but the old man jabbering is usually right. You have gaind alot of know how in your years on this planet. I should have listen to my "elders" more than i did when i was younger
     
  24. Flint_2016

    Flint_2016 Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    What really got me started on the bugging out issue was reading Creek Stewart's book"Build the Perfect Out Bag".It also steered me in the bushcraft direction now that I think of it.But several years later in the present I hear that Bugging Out may not be the best option unless #1,you're experienced,#2 it's a last chance choice.Staying at home"bugging in"unless your home was destroyed by a natural disaster,you have no money,no friends or relatives to stay with. and you have to wait it out somewhere else.FEMA?I'd rather bug out,unless it was winter time.What did the mountain men do when they had to survive in the bush year after year?Put to the test,I wonder how I'd do.The food and water situation would be #1.I already have a camp to go to,as well as sleeping gear,gun's n ammo,the 10 C's,etc..I shudder to think about it really.Creek Stewart is a trained survivalist,not me.Main thing,my wife is ill(COPD)and needs oxygen and medication(I too need meds as many of us do).The answer by process of elimination is no,I'd have to remain at home or go to a shelter in the area mostly due to my wife.When our apartment building had an electrical fire last December 2017,the Red Cross gave us a debit card valued at $550 and a room at the Ramada Motel in our hometown for three nights.The card covered the cost of the room,including our five cats(they charged us $150 for the cats)and food.But would that always happen?Thank God for the Red Cross.(Our landlord still hasn't repaired the holes that the fireman put in the walls in our apartment,and I'd be willing to bet he spent the insurance check as it's been two months since the fire).
     
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  25. apache old man

    apache old man Tracker

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    There will be a time when bug out is your only option. Flood, wild fires, earthquake and volcano eruption that destroys everything in their path. This scenario is where a well-equipped pack comes handy. Is 72 hours enough? No, just the minimum in some cases. Skills are very useful but tools are what makes daily living chores more productive.

    I love tools and I have my bush craft/backpack equipped. It can be used to make life better until it gets better. I know my pack is heavy but I am working on my second pack for the wife and share the load. I can load in my truck, bike or my back.

    Just remember, it does you any good if you have can food, with no can opener, knife or even a rock open it.

    Lots of unknowns.
     
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  26. HunterX9

    HunterX9 Scout

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    I’m in San Diego and there are fires quite often. I at least keep a bag ready with important documents, room for laptops, and any other keepsakes we absolutely need during fire season. Other than that there’s survival gear loaded in the boot of my car, a couple pallets of water/food in the garage, and anything else will have to be loaded fast if god forbid a fire comes out way.
     
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  27. MartyJ

    MartyJ Scout

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    I’m with Todd 1 hd and HunterX9. I’m not worried about bugging in as I am a gearaholic and have gear and food for days just in case I can get out camping in this busy life. I store gear and camping food in plastic bins and depending on the event, I can load any number of things in a vehicle fairly quickly. I do that, not because of bugging out but usually I have short notice when I can get into the woods and like to have stuff handy to get to. In the extreme event of food shortages or civil unrest, I would shelter in. I live in a fairly populated area but have a defensible home. In the more likely event of a natural disaster like earthquake or wildfire and we are made to leave, I can load any number of these bins in the car and do fairly well at a shelter or Wal-Mart parking lot and not depend on government handouts and sleeping gear. I do keep a complete set of cold/wet weather clothes from long John’s to coats in packs to grab if we need them. Not a big thing as we all have extra clothes and I have to store them somewhere. I am thinking of getting some of those vacuum bags so I can store more clothes in the packs. I could, of course, store the clothes in bins but I love and collect old packs so they are a handy storage device. Me and my wife are approaching our 70’s so I have no illusion of us setting off against world with backpacks on. Our more likely scenario is a natural disaster or civil unrest caused by this idiotic divisiveness this country seems locked in.
     
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  28. ra2bach

    ra2bach Bushmaster

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    unless your bug-out "bag" is a pre-loaded pallet that can be lowered into the empty bed of your pickup truck, I think all this stuff is wishful thinking...
     
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  29. LongAgoLEO

    LongAgoLEO Guide

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    I don't have a BOB per se, but my truck is laden with enough shelter, sleep gear and subsistence to support 2 adults for at least 2-weeks. I should find a way to my off-grid compound in that amount of time (30-miles) if necessary. My elderly K9 will be my biggest obstacle. At my off-grid location I have food, a well, a hard structure (original settler's cabin made of logs, wood-burner, etc.), a fish house with generator(s) and excess fuel. I'm not a prepper; I'm just fortunate to have some of the right stuff. I don't even have an overwhelming desire to "survive." I'm just enjoying the ride. SHTF scenarios are just part of the excitement of living (to me). If not, so be it... I'm ready for the "other side."
     
  30. Black5

    Black5 Supporter Supporter

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    I've said this before, and I will stand by my opinion:
    Most of you people on here have a much better chance of survival in a so called "bugout" scenario than most of the preppers I hang out with. Usually, you're going to bug out to a location like a hotel or family member home due to natural disaster. The idea of having to survive in the woods for a few days is not impossible, just unlikely. Most preppers are all about bugging in if the great reset button is pushed. Unless they have a four wheel drive semi..
    And a lot of them are about gear, but not really experienced in its use.
     
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  31. 3VOL1

    3VOL1 Tracker

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    I have done something similar to what MartyJ has done. A while ago I bought a large Coleman marine cooler. It has been repurposed as my house kit. Little by little it is being stocked with what I deem as needs and some wants in case of an emergency- bug in/out. As an example.. plastic sheeting & duct tape, long johns, and gloves are what I consider needs. Playing cards and jaw breakers are in the wants. I keep a list of what I have and what I still need to purchase.
    My point is that this kit/supply is to augment what I already have on hand, hope this makes sense.
     
  32. atlastrekker

    atlastrekker Supporter Supporter Bushclass III Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    This is very true.

    I want to add that if you are ever evacuated from your town for a natural disaster you will need a place to go. If you have no place to go is one issue to plan for. When a town down the hill from me was evacuated due to a possible dam break that would have flooded the whole city I saw first hand what people were forced to do when they had no option. Our county fairgrounds let them stay there, so quite a few people, 1000's or more, were all camped out there. The ones that had some camping gear and knew how to use it were much better off than the ones who didn't.

    Bugging in is a better option, until it isn't an option. Best to plan for both.
     
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  33. nezzman

    nezzman Tracker

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    Read this article, it's a run down of a PRACTICAL bug out bag.

    https://bornprepper.com/practical-bug-bag-checklist/

    I totally agree with most of what is said, as too many bug out bags are focused on survival gear, and cool stuff.

    In my opinion, a bug out bag is just stuff you use on a daily basis, all in one bag, so, food, some water, and a way to purify water, spare clothes, cash, important documents.... not axes, tarps...

    The chances of having to bug out to the woods are very slim, whereas the chances of having to bug out to a hotel a state away due to a hurricane, storm, fire, chemical spill, or whatever, is far more likely.

    If you are trying to pack a bag for never returning home, you need to research INCH bags, (I'm never coming home). But, why would you want to leave forever, unless you have no other option. If you have to "INCH" out, you are screwed, unless you really have a great grasp on survival i.e. foraging for food, hunting, fishing... do you think if you where to leave home in the morning, with 3 days of food, you could survive for another 20 years? I highly doubt it (no offence intended), as I know I couldn't).

    If I have to bug out, I will be bringing the things I would bring on a weekend break, plus food and water, and some tools, such as a 4 inch fixed blade, torch, lighter and what not. A knife is handy for cooking, and a torch when it's dark, and you maybe have to go to the car and get things...

    Just my 2 cents :)
     
    ArkansasFan likes this.
  34. ArkansasFan

    ArkansasFan Scout

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    That's a pretty realistic list. It's essentially what one would pack on a long-term trip with a smattering of camping and maintenance gear.

    Here in Arkansas, when there's threat of a winter storm or maybe just a quarter inch of snow, people flock to the store, raid the shelves, and essentially buy out a bunch of perishables like milk and bread.

    In contrast, about ten years ago I found myself living in a remote area (was a state officer at the time) and inferred we'd be among the last to have power restored. Rather than going to buy junk I don't use (I never eat milk or bread) I went home and made sure all of my laundry and dishes were washed and my re-chargeables were charged. I was ready for a reasonable shelter in place situation. The ice never accumulated, and the power never went off.
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2018
  35. allofthemonkeys

    allofthemonkeys Scout

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    The problem I see with Bugging Out is location. I live in the country. If there is an earthquake and my house in in danger of falling any second, and I have family that can take me in then I will 'bug out' to my family member's house. I have a bag packed so I can grab it and go with some basics so I don't have to mooch off of my family. Same goes if a forest fire threatens my small town and we need to evacuate. I am willing to take in other family members whose home is in the local flood plain. Or those who live near the Capitol and might be effected by riots and protests. But none of us plan to head to the hills and live like pioneers
     
  36. CharClothed

    CharClothed Supporter Supporter

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    Personal thought but if you're looking at traveling with the family to a location, I'd think that if you have the wife/kid carry a tarp while you carry their shelter on your pack. That way the wife and kid can have a real shelter and they feel like they can go further after a good nights sleep and you can rough it like you know how. That being said, there are some big ultralight tents out there. I've heard some good things about this one.
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Naturehike...hash=item3aff16a187:m:manEuHSHxuV0zLMbi8lnIGg

    In the end, unless you shop smart you're going to be spending a lot of money to get light weight comfort. Which if I'm fleeing for whatever reason, I'd want comfort.
     
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